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Des-Nos / Complex PTSD

Discussion in 'News, Politics & Debates' started by maus, Mar 19, 2007.

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  1. maus

    maus Active Member

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    Hope this will work. [DLMURL="http://www.ptsdforum.org/images/DESNOS.pdf"]Scientific article attached[/DLMURL].
     
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  3. maus

    maus Active Member

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    differences DESNOS and PTSD have important treatment implications

    Children and adults exposed to chronic interpersonal trauma consistently demonstrate psychological disturbances that are not captured in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis.

    The presence of DESNOS has been shown to be a powerful negative prognostic indicator of PTSD treatment outcome


    http://www.traumacenter.org/SpecialIssueComplexTraumaOct2006JTS3.pdf
     
  4. maus

    maus Active Member

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    again (ongoing trial)

    ongoing trial

    no improvement exposure therapy in complex ptsd

    What is the effect of a stabilising group treatment in complex PTSD patients? A Multicenter Randomised Clinical Trial for women with Child Abuse related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder with Associated Features.


    http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=631

    does this work?
     
  5. becvan

    becvan Queen of the Blunt! Premium Member

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    yep awesome! you did it!

    bec
     
  6. maus

    maus Active Member

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    confused

    It all started with me trying to help myself but I didn't understand what was wrong with me and why I became more and more a nutcase
    Of course I knew what PTSD was, but I developed such strange behaviour, it didn't fit into PTSD
    I knew the DSM up side down, it's my own line of work, and I couldn't find it in there
    I search the web. We have a kind of VA (USA) for vets. And there it was. On their website. One of the most prominent researchers in this field is van der Kolk, he publishes a lot in medical journals, he worked there.
    His research with vets and publications revealed an immense scale of psychopathology in vets, far beyond solely PTSD. It resembled a lot DES-NOS from the ICDH classification; DES-NOS doesn't exist in the DSM.
    DES-NOS symptoms together with PTSD explained it all for me. That was exactly what I suffered from.
    Nobody ever heard of DES-NOS around me but I have called it that for the last 1,5 years. The combination of the two is frequently called complex PTSD.
    I red as much as I could find about this. My therapist called it "yet another label, a waste basket for everything they don't understand". Everything and everybody that didn't fit the profile was put aside until it became that much they couldn't ignore it anymore and decide to give the "trash" a name. Everybody relieved. They did something with it. They named it. Bravo! That's it. And psychiatry has another page in their DSM. Everybody promoted and raise in salary.
     
  7. maus

    maus Active Member

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    17th century wisdom

    This one is from goingonhope, great quote, it says it all, mind you we are talking 2007 now!!

    Voltaire (1694 - 1778), French philosopher


    "The art of medicine consists of amusing the patient while nature cures the disease."
     
  8. minceymeatpie

    minceymeatpie Member

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    ROFLMAO Maus you hit it on the head... Bravo, another promotion for grouping together things that we don't understand and giving them names... sort of like the word "Idiopathic". Meaning "I am a doctor but have no clue what is wrong with you"!
     
  9. cookie

    cookie I'm a VIP

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    ok, forgive me for being stupid, but what is des-nos?
    cathy
     
  10. minceymeatpie

    minceymeatpie Member

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    DES-NOS is a new diagnosis proposed to be added to the DSM V to be published in 2011. It stands for Disorders of Extreme Stress - Not Otherwise Specified. It is proposed to be the official DSM V coding for what may otherwise be known as "complex PTSD" or c-PTSD.

    I deeply hope though that when they finish the DSM V and code for DESNOS, they will be very specific in their diagnostic criteria in differentiating DESNOS/cPTSD from BPD...
     
  11. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    They are still in discussion about all this, so nothing is set in concrete at this stage with the new classifications. Even once DSM V does get released, the classification system is not a doctrine, it is a guide for physicians only to help classify a person so when they go across other physicians, a simple diagnosis can be stated so the physician knows the level or severity of illness immediately, without having to go into depth with another analysis... even though a good physician would reanalyze a patient regardless what another physician has already done.

    The classification has already changed several times, and no doubt it will change again before release. If it wasn't for the revenue the book creates, most physicians actually want to get rid of it because it has done its purpose now, and is not required to become some dictator doctrine as it would like to become, but instead leave physicians to delegate and do what they are supposed to do, being treat their patients.

    Complex PTSD is a BS label at present, because all it denotes is mutiple trauma, generally based around childhood trauma, being over a progressive period of life, opposed to just a smaller period of either intense trauma (such as veterans) or a one off traumatic experience (such as car accident or the like).

    Lets be honest here; if your diagnosed with PTSD under any label, you have the same thing, its only relevance to the label is HOW you got PTSD. The end result is the same regardless the label you desire to carry, want or are given.
     
  12. PTSDd_Off

    PTSDd_Off Member

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    Hi Anthony - I agree. As you know, I was diagnosed with CPTSD but what matters is what's at the core of it. The label was important to me alone (my psych explained what you have in your post but saw that it was important for me to be able to move forward) and, in that sense, it is valuable to the patient because - for the majority of us - we need to know what we're carrying around and from that we can then work with something more 'tangible' - it has a face.

    You've made an important point in your last sentence but please - don't take the power of knowing what it is from those of us who need to know what we're dealing with - what the clinical manifestation of "how we got it" is.
     
  13. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Your point is very relevant, and well raised. Some people do need to know what they have because of what they have endured. Correct. Its only when people become focused on that label, being more my point, when it becomes a problem during the healing process, ie. I have CPTSD so I have an excuse to be in self sympathy over this person who only has acute PTSD. I have seen it many times already, hence why I personally don't encourage it. Yes, nice to know what you have for the reasons, but I always encourage people to only keep that as a thought, not focus on the label itself, but instead the core of the problem being the trauma. Once we heal trauma, learning how to manage PTSD for the remainder of our lives becomes much easier to achieve. It took me a couple of years learning how to manage PTSD, much longer than healing the trauma itself. Though mine is from military, not staged over 10 years off ongoing abuse either. This is why I will say to people, regardless of label, there is no time limit on healing trauma, and it takes as long as it takes uniquely for each individual. We are all unique, thus we all will vary and no blanket can be applied too us.

    I have seen people here come out of healing CPTSD in 4 - 5 months, then there are some who are still fighting the healing process after one year. Some get to managing PTSD sooner than others, but its all relative to us uniquely and our trauma.
     
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