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Diagnosis From Some

Discussion in 'Vehicle Accidents' started by James McGregor, Feb 7, 2017.

  1. James McGregor

    James McGregor Active Member

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    Hi all - posted this in another thread, but think this is probably the correct place for it.

    If youll allow me ill give a bit of history before asking my question, please stick with it :)

    I am a 39 year old male from Scotland. As a child i was always a nervous sort of kid, always a bit frightened with the world. For many years that wasnt really a problem, as a kid i didnt really realise that how i was was a problem.

    Shortly after my 16th birthday i was in a car accident, as i was walking home from work late one night, a car pulled up behind me and popped me on the bonnet. They drove with me on the car for a short time then i flew off and landed in the road. As i was lying on my back, momentum kept the car moving forward and i could see it heading to run over my head and body. Reaction kicked in and still on my back, i scrambled backwards to try and get out of the way, but my leg got trapped under the wheel. When the driver saw where i was, they wheelspun the car and i ended up with a badly damaged leg. For the next year i was in recovery, and over time i healed physically very well.

    I cant say i thought a lot about the accident in the following years, but since i have always suffered badly with Anxiety and Depression, going in and out of therapy as a way to cope with life. Now i cant stand crowds, i dont have any kind of social life, i have OCD issues - everything has to be a certain way, and any attempt to change my routine leads to massive panic and distress. I also have terrible health anxiety, i feel im in fear of my life a lot.

    For the last couple of years things have been a lot worse, i had a prolapsed disc in 2014, probably related to the accident all those years ago, and i had a breakdown. I think about the aftercare of the accident a lot, and quite fondly, its like i miss that time and want to be back there. The event itself does flash in my mind, but a lot of it is a blur.

    Just wondered if the accident could have all started this rollercoaster of problems, without even being aware of it in many ways? Can anyone relate or offer advice? Many thanks
     
    Gia1019 likes this.
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  3. Muted

    Muted Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    You can submit a trouble ticket on your other thread and a moderator will remove it.

    First @James McGregor YOU weren't the problem. There are all kinds of people in this world and each personality type is valuable.

    Being 'nervous' is often a cautious, sensitive and in tune to things type of personality. In general, more aware. I do think some people are more prone to PTSD based on personality, but we are each born with certain temperaments.

    It sounds like the accident has had a huge impact on your life. I'm sorry for the pain you have been through. Have you been diagnosed with PTSD? Sometimes a reinjury can really stir up past trauma and things that haven't been fully resolved. Sometimes it's like it opens the floodgates and can push us over the edge.

    I refer to trauma as a rippling affect. I think following trauma often people are vulnerable to more trauma etc. sometimes it's repeated so quickly situation after situation that people never have a chance to heal and it's an unfortunate pattern that repeats itself. I can relate to this and it angers me greatly that people don't receive the help they need and true advocates watch helplessly with their hands tied. As a result, criminals go free and victims suffer and their families suffer etc...
     
    Simply Simon likes this.
  4. James McGregor

    James McGregor Active Member

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    hi thanks for replying. Well one therapist mentioned PTSD, others have skirted around it - noone seems to want to commit to it. That seems to be how it goes in the UK. Yes thats how it feels, like my leg which was damaged in the accident is the same leg that is troubled when my back is a problem - its as if that leg is cursed in a way! Also not long before my back was a problem in 2014, i was attacked in broad daylight. Someone came up behind me and hit me across the back of the head and tried to drag me into a car. It was mistaken identity, and when they realised they ran off, but it just seems like something always happens to take my anxiety back to a maximum
     
    Gia1019 likes this.
  5. Muted

    Muted Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    It's horrible that happened to you, but glad it wasn't worse as far as taking you somewhere etc.. Are you currently going to a t?

    I understand sometimes it feels like it's never going to end, but I hope you can get some help. Anxiety is hard on the heart and feels so debilitating. I struggle with crowds too.
     
  6. James McGregor

    James McGregor Active Member

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    im waiting on a therapist becoming available, on the NHS the wait times are a minimum of 6 months. im thinking of paying to go privately soon though. Your very right, i feel terrible physically these days, every little ache or pain feels life threatening!
     
    Ronin and Gia1019 like this.
  7. Muted

    Muted Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    That would be tough to have to wait, like in essence your life gets put on hold...

    You said earlier that they were reclunctant to give you a diagnosis, why is that? Is that common there?
     
  8. James McGregor

    James McGregor Active Member

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    Yes its very common here, i have been told i may have bipolar but one therapist, but others dont agree, ptsd by some and others dont agree - it happens all the time. the prefer to leave things nameless and just treat the symptoms - no idea why, but it seems to suit the nhs
     
    Ronin and Gia1019 like this.
  9. twodogcircus

    twodogcircus New Member

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    I just read an article about traumatic stress related to motor vehicle accidents which states that "a substantial minority of MVA survivors suffer from mental health problems, the most common of which are PTSD, Major Depression, and Anxiety Disorders." The article goes on to say that "between 3% and 53% of MVA survivors who seek treatment and have PTSD also have a mood disorder such as Major Depression. Finally, in one large study of MVA survivors who sought treatment, 27% had an anxiety disorder in addition to their PTSD". The article isn't clear whether the 3-53% and 27% of MVA survivors seeking treatment for PTSD who also had a mood/anxiety disorder developed the mood/anxiety disorder a result of the MVA or whether the mood/anxiety existed in that 27% before the MVA. However, the article later says that the existence of a pre-accidental mental health issue (like depression or anxiety) has been linked to the development of PTSD.

    I think it stands to reason that if MVA related PTSD can trigger a mood/anxiety disorder in a previously mentally healthy individual, then it could definitely trigger serious mood/anxiety problems in an individual who, admittedly, had anxiety issues prior to the accident.

    It's a shame that your doctors are reluctant to formally diagnose you... I found it to be a relief when I was finally diagnosed with bipolar. It helped me make sense of mess of a life and behavior and start working at getting back to normal.
     
    Ronin likes this.
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