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Is PTSD a Disability?

Discussion in 'General' started by camry, Jan 28, 2006.

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  1. camry

    camry Member

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    Has PSTD been classed as a bona fide disability yet?

    Recently I had to resort to parking in a underground carpark at night, a fair way away from the exits & elevators. Environments like this are a main trigger for an attack with me. I saw the disabled parking zones next to the elevator empty, and was tempted to park in them, but guilt took over that disabled people might need them. In the end I ended up not attending the function fearing it would trigger an attack (trust me... attending a function bathed in sweat & trembling isn't my idea of fun!).

    It got me thinking... I was unable to attend because of a disability. And how many others go through the same thing?

    Admittedly things like parking wouldnt be such an issue in a more visual parking area like a shopping center, but in some situations like above, it is very much an issue. And considering that there is so much parking undergound these days at function centers and entertainment venues ... should this be maybe something that should be addressed?
     
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  3. permban0008

    permban0008 Policy Enforcement Banned

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    Dear Camry,

    I don't know about the PTSD being classified as a disability - Anthony may be able to help on that one. I do know this however, disability or not, PTSD or not, I would not have parked in a dark, isolated area in any car park for anyone or any function. Like you, it would have been the disability car park or nothing. I don't blame you and while I do not have PTSD, I do not park my car in any of those areas at night because it scares the hell out of me. Besides it is just plain common sense not to.

    Granted, not attending the function is probably more a PTSD thing but you have to do what you feel safe doing.
     
  4. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Ok, here is a .[DLMURL="http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/vrpdf/trum/TR2001129.PDF"]pdf on disability parking[/DLMURL] for Australia, by state. ACROD is the oversight for Australia on disabled parking. Each State have their own unique rules and regulations to disabled parking. Some allow for mental illness, some not. I dare say, each application is taken on its own merit, and with physician advice in hand.

    The WA application and guidelines are here.

    That should help you to enquire. I know that Queensland allow a red parking permit for the exact thing as you encountered, for mental illness disabilities, though not every state does this. You need to read the ACROD site, linked above, which outlines each state in detail with links to all forms and contacts.

    Hope that helps!
     
  5. camry

    camry Member

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    Thanks for that Anthony... will look into it.
     
  6. livelysue

    livelysue Member

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    PTSD is a disability according to the doctors here in Canada but the government does not thinks so. I had to go back to work even though the doctors do not believe I should be working or ever again should be working as the finances could not be covered by my husband work. Going back to work did not help our marriage either. I did try to apply for disability benefits but was told my condition did not qualify.

    Governments believe only the military suffer PTSD and then they are even stingy in giving them disability. As was evident in Toronto a few years ago where a military officer suffering PTSD ran his SUV into a government building as he could not get the help he needed for his PTSD.

    Governments need to be educated that PTSD is a cripling disability that effects every aspect of a persons life. Nothing will be done until governments recognize that fact.
     
  7. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Yer, but your fighting two different organizations there Sue. Military come under Veterans Affairs within their relevant country, and civilian come under disability... Both are as bad as each other, and both are there to protect the overall money pot of the countries citizens. I also completely agree that people who need help, aren't being supported. Some of this is coming from the sudden spike in PTSD and claims associated with it on a global scale.

    If every claim was approved, each country would be broke, tied up in disability payments. I have friends here who did the same as me, and have been rejected for their PTSD claim based on they have other sustainable injuries that VA simply use to protect themselves and the public, by stateing its not the PTSD that is affecting them from working again, more the other injury. I believe all countries, both organizations, tie people up in this type of crap.

    The way America is currently publicising PTSD, and diagnosing it, the already broke government would be a lot more broke if they approved all the claims. People who have PTSS are being diagnosed with PTSD, and whilst a doctor / physician says they have it, the organizations say they don't, causing a conflict of interest. This is where people end up doing the doctor shuffle, so they can try and get a doctor to say "NO", this person does not have PTSD, even if 10 other doctors said "THEY DO", the organizations take the one that says "NO".

    It is bullshit, and some people fight it in court, but even that takes a couple of years generally. The red tape comes out when disability is mentioned, and I don't see it changing anytime soon.
     
  8. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    I must admit though, many people with PTSD can actually work again, its just they can't work in certain environments. Putting someone with PTSD to deal with customers is not a bright idea, for obvious reasons. People with PTSD generally can work in low stress environments, work for themselves or non-profit organizations, and many other low stress workplaces.

    Yes, a person may need to curl up for a year or two and work themselves out first, but most should be capable of returning to some form of work again. It is recently studied that to help cope with mental illness, some sort of return to work program is one of the best options to get a person moving again, becoming functional within society, grasping social facets of life again, basically everything that PTSD works against us.
     
  9. birdgirl214

    birdgirl214 New Member

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    Yes, PTSD is a disability

    I am an American, and I recieve full disability benifits ( social security ) from being diagnosed with PTSD, as well as Major Depressive Disorder and Somatic Disorder. I was diagnosed almost 8 years ago, but did not seek any help until 2 years after that, once I had lost my job, my home, and had a 30,000 hospital bill which forced me into bankruptsy, as well as everyone in my life not being able to stand to be around me, and constant abdominal pain that no doctor could figure out, as well as all types of gastro intestinal disorders, all because of the PTSD and the depression, but I didn't think PTSD was a disabilty either, until I was at the point where I was almost on the street.

    Someone told me to go to the social security office because PTSD was a disability, and I felt wierd about it, but I was desperate, and there I was interviewed by a couple of the state shrinks, and it took 6 months for them to aprove my disability, but once they did it was the full amount, and I also get medicare now to help pay for my doctor bills, which I have had alot of health issues due to the PTSD so that has been a blessing. I live in Michigan, and our state has a program called a ticket to work, which I signed up for, agreeing to only keep my disability checks for 5 years while they try to help me get back into society as a normal person.

    The state has helped me go to school, so that I could learn a trade that I could actually perform, and it has helped my depression alot. It also made me eligible to see a shrink at a discounted rate because who can afford $100 an hour. Not me. I have gotten better for sure, but I still have PTSD, and have learned to do things differently now. I have many memory problems because of the PTSD, so now I write myself notes constantly. I have problems with startle response, so I'm jumpy all the time, I get overly stressed out over small things, and get panic attacks easily.

    Everyday is a challenge, but I'm sure I would be alive today if it were not for the help I recieved. The college I go to also recognizes PTSD as a disability, and they allow me to have extra time on tests which helps with the anxiety. The state is going to help me find a job once I graduate, and although I know I will never be able to do the kind of job I once did, I am gratefull for the chance to try and start my life over again which I could have not done without that.

    PTSD is definatly a disabilty, and should be treated like one, but I'm proud that I'm graduating May 6th on the deans list.
     
  10. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Hi Bird Girl, welcome to the forum.

    That is some good solid advice for those here that are American. Thank you very much.

    Australia is a bit different though, in that yes, you can be put on disability payments for PTSD, however; in the aspect of such things as getting disability parking, its not that easy. That is what Camry was relating to firstly, as one of her traumas involved being attacked because her car was out of sight within car parking stations.

    You said it took you 6 months to get approved for disability, and from all accounts from your writing above, your definately at the same level as many here, in that you suffer quite dramatically. I hear stories direct from people about claiming under disability, some get approved, some don't, and all concerned have PTSD to generally a severe level.

    Congrats on the graduation... well done. That is most certainly a challenge for anyone with PTSD, and your most definately a person others can view as successfully fighting this disorder and pushing to get on with your life to a standard that fits within PTSD. Honestly, very well done. Your a shining light to everyone with this disorder.

    Sounds like you have also been through some pretty rough stuff. How is your life now? Are you more financially secure in that you don't have to stress about those aspects now?

    How did you get PTSD?
     
  11. piglet

    piglet Well-Known Member

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    Excellent work Bird Girl - be proud! :clap:
     
  12. permban0008

    permban0008 Policy Enforcement Banned

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    Welcome Bird Girl and congratulations on your achievements at studying with PTSD. You can be justifiably proud of yourself. I also study part-time and I struggle with that sometimes without having PTSD (Anthony is my husband). Great to have you on board so that others can see, achievements can be made with a little 'tweaking' here and there. Again, good on you!!! Please keep coming to the forum and let us know a little about you. You are welcome anytime.
     
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