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No help, too much politics

Discussion in 'Military & Emergency Services' started by Sailor_Jerry89, Jul 20, 2017.

  1. Sailor_Jerry89

    Sailor_Jerry89 New Member

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    So I am writing this post from my new command, which is a Naval Hospital for treatment. I was supposed to be sent here for treatment for PTSD. I have done the VA evaluation, but that is about it. Since moving here I have LESS treatment (one visit every two weeks compared to 2-3 visits to the doctor a week), I work a normal schedule, and I feel like the command is pretty much just throwing me somewhere to work until the process is over, yet won't help me. My immediate chain is great, but they can only accomplish so much, and bringing up the issues to the higher ups has yielded no results. My one visit every two weeks is composed of telling me about the VA process and telling me "I don't think you will get treatment here or feel better while in the Navy" (yes, my DOCTOR said this). I also asked about a service dog (I have very severe panic attacks. The last one saw me in the hospital with a blood pressure of 209/140 from sheer adrenaline.), and was told it was a 'liability' for them to proscribe one because then it gets into 'legally disabled' status and they can't do that. So I ask about alternative treatments and am met with 'No idea, we tried all the conventional stuff and it didn't work'. I seriously feel like I am fighting an uphill battle just to GET treatment. Any advice on coping strategies, outlets for aggression/irritability/depression, or advice in general? I could use the assistance.
     
    TexCat and Simply Simon like this.
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  3. Rosie11

    Rosie11 Active Member

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    I'm sorry you are having to deal with such a difficult situation :( Maybe some grounding techniques could help for when you are feeling very stressed/depressed/upset? Thinking of a "happy place" helps me sometimes, a time or place when you felt safe and happy and thinking about that place can help to calm you sometimes.
     
    Sailor_Jerry89 likes this.
  4. DharmaGirl

    DharmaGirl Crazy Chicken Lady Premium Member

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    Could you get some DBT training? Even the DBT workbook on Amazon helped me so much. It is a great way of working on changing behaviors. If they are worried that you would be on disability because you need a service dog, doesn't that mean you are already disabled by PTSD? They don't seem to be making sense. Are you planning on making the Navy your career, or are you getting out soon?
     
    TexCat, dulcia and Simply Simon like this.
  5. Simply Simon

    Simply Simon Be Bold. Moderator Premium Member

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    Yes, this^?
     
  6. Sailor_Jerry89

    Sailor_Jerry89 New Member

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    I will be getting out January or February of 2018 (they are medically retiring me, which would make me legally disabled), but can't give me the service dog (which I offered to pay for out of pocket if necessary) because then the doctors here would be calling me disabled. They need to wait for the doctors in DC (who, btw, might be anything from an orthopedic surgeon to a dermatologist) to say "Ok, you are disabled". It is insanely asinine.
     
    TexCat and Simply Simon like this.
  7. DharmaGirl

    DharmaGirl Crazy Chicken Lady Premium Member

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    Very true! The way that they treat servicemen and women with PTSD is horrible. Don't admit it, and it won't have happened. Really a lot like a disfunctional family.
     
  8. Prough

    Prough Member

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    I got out 2012 with ptsd. Since then I keep trying to dip my toe in the water at the va. What you are describing is very similar to how I was treated. For me the treatment I have recieved from the va, was not worth the bus fare to reach it. If you are getting medically retired there will be additional rules you will have to learn to protect yourself and your pension. After 5 years, I am maybe 5% of the way to understanding this beast.
    I try not to hold it against them. I genuinely think a lot of people at the va want to help. They've been beating thier heads against the same wall I am, for a lot longer, getting roughly nothing done. That thought doesn't really get me the care I need, but it seems to piss me off a lot less.
    I did try shopping around a bit. There was another clinic only 80 miles or so further. While the care I recieved there was not much better, the staff were incredibly commited and respectful.
    In reality we are asking them to treat an icredibly complicated disease, on incredibly limited resources with a smile. It seems impossible but, this site is littered with guys that pulled it off.
    As for the dog, there are bunch of groups popping up here and there that are just giving away service dogs to ptsd vets. The ones I looked into used a lottery system.
     
  9. Parley

    Parley Active Member

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    There is an article on the VA site about dogs and PTSD. In order to qualify for a service dog you must have a physical disability. A PTSD dog is considered an emotional support dog. Best of luck to ya~
     
  10. TexCat

    TexCat Not a cat or a native Texan. Premium Member

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    It wouldn't help at work, but do you have a dog at home? My dog instinctively has become my emotional support dog.

    Is there a quiet place at work that you can go to when needing to ground yourself?
     
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  11. Simply Simon

    Simply Simon Be Bold. Moderator Premium Member

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    This is completely, almost laughably false, FYI. :tup:
     
    Friday and Gadgie like this.
  12. Parley

    Parley Active Member

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  13. Simply Simon

    Simply Simon Be Bold. Moderator Premium Member

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    ... You're reading that article incorrectly. They differentiate service animals and ESAs. That's a true distinction. Offering comfort or protection is not a service task. Jumping on top of a vet who is having a nightmare to apply pressure and lick one's face is a task. Barking and pawing at someone who is beginning to dissociate is a task. Maintaining a perimeter (circling) around someone in a crowd is a task.

    http://www.iaadp.org/psd_tasks.html

    Working Dogs For Vets

    Specifically for the US: Frequently Asked Questions about Service Animals and the ADA

    ETA: I have been personal friends with someone who has PTSD and has a task-trained service dog. We had a member here (Popeye, I think?) who was a vet with a service dog. I have also been in contact with a vet who not only had a service dog for his PTSD but started a foundation to train dogs specifically for vets and who was working on launching a show about that work. Not to mention JustMeHere has a service dog in compliance with ADA laws for her service dog. So. I mean. I'm glad you read that one article highlighting the difference between ESAs and SDs, but... no.
     
    joeylittle likes this.
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