1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

The Daily Dose

Get the last 24hrs of new topics delivered to your inbox.

Click Here to Subscribe

Physical Effects - PTSD or Age Upon the Body?

Discussion in 'General' started by piglet, Aug 28, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. piglet

    piglet Well-Known Member

    817
    87
    0
    I've discovered more recently that the physical effects I get are much more than I initially thought.

    When I was on holiday, my friends and I decided to climb a mountain - 1465m to the top, 12km total walking distance. Even before ptsd had a significant effect on my life, I would expect to feel sore for a couple of days after such a climb. This time, we climbed on Saturday and I was in significant pain from aching muscles and just wiped out energy-wise until the Thursday.

    The climb itself was more tiring than I'd expected, as I walk a lot each day normally, so I thought I was fitter than I turned out to be. Is this result from exercise normal for ptsd?

    I am also experiencing the same effects having run around chasing an escaped wallaby for 4 hours on Saturday. I didn't feel tired while doing it - I guess it was the focus and adrenaline - but I have been laid up since and I ache everywhere.

    I'm wondering if I should expect to feel so tired and sore for so long. Also wondering if it's the ptsd effects or age-related effects! I understand that because I am so tense all the time, my muscles are working harder and have less time to rest, but why does a bit of strenuous exercise have such painful after effects? It's really bugging me!
     
  2. Register to participate in live chat, PTSD discussion and more.
  3. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

    32,969
    46,397
    57,850
    Yes, PTSD does have an effect on our overall energy, muscles and every aspect of our body Piglet, but age is generally the overall factor that increases recovery time from exercise. Basically, the older we get, to maintain the same efforts, we must exercise more, maintain our bodies more, eat more healthier, etc etc... all because of age. It is like going for a 5km run as a smoker at 21 opposed to the same person at 31, still smoking, still running each day their 5km's, at age 31 the recovery time will be significantly increased from age 21. Age 35 higher again, etc etc...

    Basically, at some point you have to come to terms with age and fitness, and say well... I either exercise more to maintain the same effort I did last year, or I exercise the same and accept I cannot achieve the same results as I did last year, and may need to have an extra rest for the age barrier. These are factual statistics piglet... so don't beat yourself up too much hey.
     
  4. mac

    mac Active Member

    212
    6
    0
    I can only tell you what I found with my own personal self... I have deteriorated physically since coming back from Iraq. I blame it all on the stress that I have went through, as before going, I was in good health. But its important to note that I also let myself go in a lot of ways because my depression I guess. I look about 10 years older than what I am... I have bags under my eyes and wrinkles (crow's feet) also. I have put on a lot of weight over the month's; about 60 pounds or so. I've been diagnosed with asthma. Just recently diagnosed with diabetes. I am chronically tired and weak, except when I'm fired-up mad. My sleep sucks. I have poor memory (before my diagnosis I used to think I was developing attention deficit disorder or going senile). I can't concentrate when someone talks to me in person. My hearing has gotten worse. I have pains in my joints and neck/back muscles. My liver is worse off. I'm impotent. My eye sight is much worse. I have skin sores on my arms and legs. My feet look horrible; dried up red and flacky skin. I got high Blood Pressure. My hair has thinned out some. And I've probably forgotten some shit. My wife initially thought I was being dramatic when I told her my life expectancy will not be much longer (I had like a strong intuition of this)... she now knows otherwise. I'm 32 and I feel like I got about 10 to 20 years left at this rate... probably more like 2-3 years. I truly believe "stress" has done this to me either directly or indirectly.
     
  5. piglet

    piglet Well-Known Member

    817
    87
    0
    I totally get you there Mac. On the other hand, the nutritionist in me is is reading your post and saying "are you getting your 5 portions of fresh fruit & veg each day?". A lot of the things you describe are signs of malnutrition. When you are under stress, your body needs much more in the way of vitamins & minerals than normal. Looking at your diet might be a great way to turn things around for you - it doesn't even have to be huge changes either (like docs would have you believe).

    Take a visit to your local health food shop and look at all the packets of nuts and dried fruits etc they have. They are really good to have around as a nibble when you can't be bothered to cook something and they are full of good stuff, yet taste like they should be bad for you!

    Sorry if you've heard all this before (which you probably have). What I'm trying to say is that you still have loads of time and ways to turn this around. I know it doesn't seem like it - I have the same thoughts myself - why bother with a pension I'm never going to receive? etc. I'm fairly convinced I'll drop dead before I'm 50, even though I keep myself in good shape as much as I can. I have more issues with anorexia, but still suffer from malnutrition if I don't eat properly. You wouldn't believe the difference a pack of pumpkin seeds makes - full of zinc - very good for the sex drive!
     
  6. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

    32,969
    46,397
    57,850
    You are correct mac, in that stress does do that, but in regard to the ability of your body to cope with exercise, age has an important part on that one. What you say mac is pretty normal for those with PTSD, in that if you don't get it under control quickly, then things get much worse very fast. As you can now lay witness, you need to stop being angry at the past, and now get on with healing from your past, coming to terms with your new self, and get trauma and associated symptoms under control ASAP.
     
  7. piglet

    piglet Well-Known Member

    817
    87
    0
    Yeah - but I'm only 30! And I can't have aged that much since a year ago! :eek:

    There has been a huge difference in my recovery time from exercise since the ptsd kicked into gear. Ok, I am getting older, but not that quickly.....I'll need a zimer frame for my next birthday!
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

User search cloud:

  1. ptsd life expectancy

Show Sidebar