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Please don't use olanzapine

Discussion in 'Medications & Substances' started by Super CoolTM, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. bento

    bento Active Member

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    I've seen an anecdotal account of a musician who contracted severe Menniere's (ringing in ears
    combined with dizziness, hearing loss) after a period of severe stress (not PTSD). He found a
    way to bring it into remission with an interesting and rather exacting protocol of diet, meds, and
    supplements. And reducing stress. Meniere's Disease - a success story and treatment plan - Joe Bongiorno
    Might be the common denominator is stress and concomitant poor diet, sleep, etc.
     
    EveHarrington likes this.
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  3. Suzetig

    Suzetig Still the Staff Kitteh... Moderator

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    All staff post as members unless clearly stated otherwise - we work within the community constitution like all other members. I don't need to be "professional" posting in my private capacity.

    People come to this site very often looking for good support and information about an illness that significantly inhibits their daily lives, very often desperate for some insight into how to relieve their pain. And there is a huge amount of support and knowledge here, from people who really do know what they're talking about and can evidence that knowledge.

    Posting as "fact" something that is clearly opinion is dangerous. For example suggesting it's possible for a lay person to differentiate between PTSD and schizophrenia purely by isolating and observing, suggesting that people with PTSD will always stabilise within 5 days and stay stable without medication, telling people that X medication did Y to me so no one should use it, saying presenting symptoms of PTSD ordinarily include ringing in the ears? It's all dangerous when stated as fact because people will read it, think it the person knows what they're talking about and act on it.

    Take the "PTSD stabilises and stays stable without medication". I have no idea where you got that from but the very nature of PTSD means that the symptoms must both impair daily life and have endured over a period of time - usually at least a month though many diagnosticians will look for 3 months to allow for post trauma stress that's part of the usual healing process. The diagnostic criteria states the symptoms must be enduring.

    Can you see that someone desperate for help, who thinks all of their symptoms are so awful they must be something more than trauma might read your post and think "shit, this has been going on for years, and I've never felt stable even with medication, and I've been away from my abusers for years so I should be stable, it must be schizophrenia" and then spend huge amounts of time and money looking for a doctor to diagnose something they patently don't have, instead of working on PTSD, which they do in fact have.

    I can go through my other examples and explain why they're potentially incredibly dangerous if you wish, but I think you'll be able to figure it out.

    It's fine for anyone to state their opinion here, and it's equally fine and important for that opinion to be strongly challenged because what we write here matters. Because you don't know how people will read and use what you've said.

    I removed the website citation from your post because, having looked, I couldn't find the information you cited on the website. If you pm me a link to the relevant page, I'll insert it into your post. Per @anthony's post though citing opinion, including opinion gained from another website, doesn't make something fact.
     
  4. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Sure about that? PTSD has nothing to do with ringing in the ears. Trauma is one thing, but linking a diagnosis to symptoms is a whole other level of absurdity. PTSD is not the go to link for everything in a persons life. PTSD is a diagnostic label that befits a specific symptom profile. It should not be used outside of its current diagnostic context.
     
    Akhos, joeylittle and Suzetig like this.
  5. lostforgottensoul

    lostforgottensoul I'm a VIP Premium Member

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    That's not ringing in the ears but noise sensitity and you do a search on here for noise sensitity and see what comes up. I can remember 5 destinct times where JL recommended a white noise machine and zero medical causes to be able to say "yes, this is why lostforgottensoul wants to take someone who is making an everyday noise and stab them until they stop making the everyday noise." Also there is a ton of research on PTSD and noise sensitivity as I have been researching my extreme reaction to the smallest of sounds.

    I would not say its a PTSD symptom like flashbacks are but I certianly wouldn't rule out PTSD being the cause either.
     
    EveHarrington likes this.
  6. Ragdoll Circus

    Ragdoll Circus I'm a VIP Premium Member

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    Oh. A musician who developed ringing in the ears. Go figure.
     
    Suzetig likes this.
  7. Suzetig

    Suzetig Still the Staff Kitteh... Moderator

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    Noise sensitivity can sometimes be part of hypervigilence, in that if all your systems are on high alert it makes sense that your hearing would be more sensitive too. It's not a PTSD symptom in its own right though in that it's not part of the diagnostic criteria.

    People have sensitive hearing for all kinds of reasons. Assuming its PTSD without having other potential causes checked out could mean someone doesn't get help for something that might be easily fixed.
     
    lostforgottensoul likes this.
  8. bento

    bento Active Member

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    Yep, a pianist who contracted Meniere's. A condition most commonly associated with vertigo,
    tinnitus, and hearing loss. Go figure? Okaaay.
     
  9. joeylittle

    joeylittle ˁ˚ᴥ˚ˀ All howl, no bite Administrator

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    Yes, because a white noise machine uses sound to ‘block’ other sounds. (Highly unscientific description there). Nothing to do with why. People with all sorts of sleep difficulties, focus difficulties, etc - all benefit from a white noise machine. It addresses many different disorders.

    Olanzapine is the topic. Let’s get back to it.
     
  10. mumstheword

    mumstheword Well-Known Member

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    I think we've scared off the original poster, but I'm going to bravely say, I found the post had some merit. My son is on Olazipine and while I'm not going to freak out in response to the OP's claims about Olanzapine, I am going to ask his psych if we can explore options for a, perhaps more recent, non-metabolic psych drug replacement, because he's only been on it for a short time and his weight has ballooned. Surely not a long term healthy option. I know it's the drug that's caused the weight gain.
     
    anthony likes this.
  11. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Many psycho-active medications have weight gain / weight loss, as potential side effects. Maybe explore one that does not?
     
  12. mumstheword

    mumstheword Well-Known Member

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    Exactly :)
     
    anthony likes this.
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