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PTSD For 15 Years - Still Trying to Get Better

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by girlinthemirror, Aug 27, 2007.

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  1. girlinthemirror

    girlinthemirror New Member

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    Well this is my first time in any kind of forum online. I have been looking for a support group to join in my area but haven't been able to find one. In some ways, this seems easier. I have had complex ptsd for 15 years. I'm 34, and it started after I was abused in a wilderness camp where I went to work for 3 months when I was 19. Until that abuse, I had been a very successful and high-functioning person with a very bright future, although I also came from a background of family alcoholism and dysfunction. In some ways, I still feel 19 years old or younger.

    Although I have tried for years and years and developed better ways to cope, I still feel I am very very far from living the life that I deserve, one that is filled with light and love. Right now I am struggling with the issue of co-dependency in my relationships and a feeling of being isolated and not understood by my family, and also being seen as a colossal disappointment to them.

    Because of my health, my ability to earn a living is limited, and have lived many years as the (barely) "working poor" while others in my peer group are successful professionals. I guess what I hope to gain here, is a place where I can really talk to people who understand the illness, and start to unravel some of the mysteries it entails. One thing that I really wonder about is I experience an enhanced sense of perception, which is both a blessing and a curse. Does anyone else have this, and does anyone know where I can get more info about how complex ptsd affects perception? I have been doing some reading on autism spectrum disorder sites, and i feel intuitively that there is something in common there--"sensory overload" I would like to find out much more about this. Thanks.
     
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  3. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Hi GINM, welcome to the forum. What you looking for, I believe you have found. There is no shortage of people here surrounding PTSD itself. Jump in is the best way, get yourself involved and talking, asking questions, and just feel at home.
     
  4. She Cat

    She Cat I'm a VIP Premium Member

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    Hi Girl,

    Welcome to the forum.....Interesting thoughts about Autism...My grandson has Aspergers which is also on the spectrum. The sensory over load.........hmmm My grandson has a hard time with this.

    Wendy
     
  5. socrates70

    socrates70 New Member

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    Hey girlinthemirror,I'm in a similar situation in my mid thirties and been going through this for 16 years.I was what I thought at at the time successful making good money etc.What I was actually doing was what a lot of the population do which is just keep moving working going out or what-ever so I didn't have to stop and think.But when I did it's been as I'm sure you know so incredibly difficult,but out of it I'm thankful that I've had a chance to understand what is actually important and gained some depth and perspection beyond what I may have had.I'm in the same boat with work I'll be feeling really good get back to work then be frazzled after a couple months,quit recover and get back to it.You were talking about enhanced perception,for me the thing that I could correlate with that is whether just innately or from being hurt i"m a very sensitive person.Being sensitive I think your more aware and open to everyone and everything around you that others might not be who have a thicker skin.Also there is such a thing as containing where if you are in a room with some-one with-out saying or doing anything we contain their feelings and emotions and this gives more sensitive types a clearer perception of what others might be going through.Just a thought.I've found that meditation,spiritual persuits and a good therapist in the past have made the difference between night and day.Try to stay optimistic and don't give up hope, I'm sure that you'll get all of those good thing s in life that you talked about.Good luck.Socrates.70
     
  6. rt1967

    rt1967 Active Member

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    hi Girl, thanks for your message .I have been told i have complex ptsd i don't really understand yet they have said it is from early childhood i don't really remember my childhood at all.My friends son is thought to have aspergers and she says there are similarities between us sensory overload and finding it easier to handle small pieces of information also it makes more sense of that in some kind of way reading your post.If i find any good books or info will post .Thanks for your post ,would love to see you get the good things in life you deserve.
     
  7. batgirl

    batgirl I'm a VIP

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    Hmm well since I have both autism and severe PTSD, I know firsthand the sensory problems related to each disorder. I have to say from personal experience there are some similarities, but the two disorders present very differently. Sensory issues with autism are a constant, daily occurance that you simply must learn to live with, there is really nothing you can do to make it better other than avoiding things that cause sensory overload. However, with PTSD, avoidance is not a good idea if you are trying to heal. If you use exposure therapy, your sensory issues can actually get better with PTSD. Additionally, even when I was really ill with the PTSD I did have "breaks" where I felt less badly. I guess I'm basically saying that, with therapy and hard work, the sensory issues with PTSD can improve, but that's really not the case with autism. I would kind of liken it to asthma vs. emphysema. PTSD being asthma, autism being emphysema. Both are permanent conditions that cause problems with breathing, however asthma can be managed very well, emphysema can not.
     
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