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Question - do you use a service dog?

Discussion in 'Employment, Education & Disability' started by sibemom, Oct 29, 2006.

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  1. sibemom

    sibemom Active Member

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    Since I am new here and still trying to absord all the information available and I think you can relate that ABSORBING is a big issue:crazy-blu , this question might have already been aswered. What I want to know is if any of you use a Service Dog for the PTSD???? The option has become available to me and I was curious to see if anyone else uses a dog instead of or in combination with the meds, therapy etc.... Thanks

    Ann
     
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  3. Daisy

    Daisy New Member

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    I've not heard about this, how does a Service Dog help with PTSD?
    I know dogs can be very smart and good for combatting general stress, so I sort of get it. Do you like dogs?
     
  4. becvan

    becvan Queen of the Blunt! Premium Member

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    I can honestly say I've never heard this was available. However, I was told to get a dog a long time ago and have been asked repeatedly if I have one now, by therapists. She is essential to my saftey zone (early warning system) for domestic violence and part of a saftey plan. So I can see the logic behind it for those purposes. Where do you live that this is offered? Do you know what the reasoning is for using a service dog or who that would be through?

    Bec
     
  5. kimG

    kimG Well-Known Member

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    If I am remembering correctly, there is someone on here that uses a service dog. I'm sure they'll post here...their dog is gorgeous, too!
     
  6. piglet

    piglet Well-Known Member

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    I have my dog. She is not a service dog, but I'd be lost without her. She is company, she gets me out for exercise and she gets me out of bed in the morning.
     
  7. JoannaG

    JoannaG Active Member

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    I have my Jack russel now but then I'm an animal freak anyway.
    When I first moved up to this area into town with my kids I got a rottewieler
    from rotty rescue. At the time I was still being stalked by my ex and every loser on the planet was showing up at my door looking for a free lay.
    My roteweiler loved th kids, hated the smell of beer and drugs and would stand guard beside me whenever someone new was around. He was great for the safety aspect. Great companion to me and sure as hell made people think before they acted while around me.
    Yea I think it's greatto have a dog around.
     
  8. sibemom

    sibemom Active Member

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    Well I was aware of psychiatirc service dogs way before this happened to me because I trained them along with other service dogs. I don't really know if there is a specific school that trains them mostly they are handler trained under the guidance of a PRO. I was inspired to do something to help myself instead of sitting around feeling sorry for myself and useless, so I with the help of my husband and a few freinds in my Dog Training Circle did more research about how a dog could assist me because of the issues I have with the medication. The theory is that the dog will alert you to episodes of panic, and keep you in a better state of reality. They also can take you out of a situation, remind you to take meds, snap you out of a panic attack by staying close to you and also keep people at a distance, go get help by barking and alerting someone to assist you AND can be taught to hit Speed dial to call 911 on your home phone or on an emergency phone that you carry with you. The other part of the theory is if you focus on the dog and not on all the things that stem an attack of fear and endangerment, you will be able to work through the attacks. I own a Border Collie who is being trained by me to assist me. I was just curious if anyone else had a dog that they use for this purpose. My therapist and Neuro Psychiatrist very much support my use of a dog, very new to them also but I am finding that with time maybe I can get off all the meds. This dog will also offer me the skill of getting in between me and people so that I am not accidently bumped because that sometimes will bring on the RSD pain.

    Ann
     
  9. becvan

    becvan Queen of the Blunt! Premium Member

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    Thanks for the very quick reply! My dog is also a border collie. She is not a service dog though. She carries out all those functions (minus the med reminder and dialing 911!!) for me. I did get her for the purpose of safety and an early warning system. It was suggested to me by a therapist when I left a really abusive partner. That is not covered by the Guide Dogs program though. The police will also suggest that Domestic violence victims get a dog for safety when it's serious. You have to train them yourself though. (mind you I live in a remote area with few resources, it wouldn't suprise me if that is available to city folks). So in the same sense, I would say yes, there are many of us with dogs in the same capacity. However, it would not be from the Guide dogs program.

    Have any training tips?? LOL

    Bec
     
  10. sibemom

    sibemom Active Member

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    See that is the misconception. These dogs ARE NOT GUIDE DOGS, they do not provide what a LEADER DOG WOULD but are considered a service dog and covered under the law through the ADA. A psychiatric service dog, who YES can be trained by the handler only provides to the handler WHAT THEY NEED assistance with in conjunction with their condiditon. For me Brody offers me assistance with getting out in public, keeping people at a comfortable distance or if I have a panic attack which I did yesterday GETS ME TO A SAFE PLACE by tugging on my pant leg or sleeve gets me seated, and then does something called COVER ME by putting his paws in my lap and licking my face or ear untill I calm down and re grip my reality. I would be more than happy to offer training tips if I can do not be afraid to ask.

    Ann
     
  11. becvan

    becvan Queen of the Blunt! Premium Member

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    Sorry! I went and looked it up! Yep they are available here, but I imagine the process would be unreal (like everything else in Canada.)

    Coug does some of it naturally. She wakes me up from nightmares, lickes, cuddles and cries when I'm "out of it." Keeps people away (but listens on command whether verbal or hand signal), guards and warns when someone is near home, car or us. She even herds the kids back into the yard (very funny to watch! LOL) If she doesn't like someone (when we are walking or if they come to the house) I listen to her. I trust her instincts more than mine!! So, the only thing she doesn't do (that would be nice) is tug on my leg to remove me from a situation where I panic. She tries to comfort me instead!! LOL. She's pretty smart. I never taught her any of this. She is my first dog and I didn't have a clue how to train her. She did most of it on her own. The hand signals was completely by accident. I can point and she will stay, drop, sit, backup, sing, talk, bark or growl!!

    How old is yours? Coug is three (her full name is Cougar but I call her Coug or Cougie most of the time.)

    Bec
     
  12. sibemom

    sibemom Active Member

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    Brody will be 2 in December, and you are right they do most of this on their own without being taught. Thus why a BC makes the perfect medical alert/psychiatric servcie dog. I also have two GSD females that do very well at making me feel safe at home. I was also a battered woman and even though I am now remarried for almost 9 years my ex is a very frightening man, and still to this day trys to cause me problems I dealt with that really well before this accident but now it seems like I am almost right back to where I was a long time ago. So YES MY GIRLS DO A GOOD JOB in the safety department LOL. That is so great about your dog. You do not need to be a pro, I was lucky because I trained dogs for many many years all you have to to is work at it. Bless your 4 legged freind they truly are a great help!

    Ann
     
  13. permban0077

    permban0077 Policy Enforcement Banned

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    Ok, I will admit I did not read the whole post yet, I will, just pressed for time this second (family meeting). But it is Boo with the service dog but I am pretty sure it is for the physical limitations from the attack she endured. A beautiful Dobie. It is in the trauma diary and so is the pic...

    That just sounds amazing and I could see if they were "official" so you could take them in a resteraunt or store would be majorly benificial! I think that would be of major service as I am as a result extremely agoraphobic and it is so painful to to function outside my home. I have 4 dogs. 3 Great Pyrenees, 2 for livestock guarding, one retired, and a black and tan mutt that had mange and a staph infection from a free puppy box. I was suckered by the kids as I would not get out of the truck but they brought the poor thing to me and I had to help it. She is my best friend now and very protective home-wise and socialized in parks with kids at the park during her training to behave outside the home.

    But the reasons you stated sound amazing! Please share any training tips or link where we could read more about this. I would love to read up on it! Very interesting.
     
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