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Study Identifies Childhood Risks For Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Discussion in 'News, Politics & Debates' started by anthony, Jan 19, 2007.

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  1. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Young adults are more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing a traumatic event if they had high levels of anxiety and depression as first-graders, a new study shows.

    And having aggressive or disruptive behavior problems in first grade increased the risk of being the victim of "assaultive" violence, such as being mugged or badly beaten up, Dr. Naomi Breslau of Michigan State University in East Lansing and colleagues found.

    In contrast, first-graders with the highest levels of reading readiness were less likely to experience assaultive violence as young adults.

    Most people are exposed to at least one traumatic event that could provoke PTSD, Breslau and her team note, but fewer than 10 percent of people develop PTSD after such an event.

    To better understand how behavior in childhood might affect later PTSD risk, the researchers followed 1,698 children from their entry into first grade to age 21. During the course of the study, 82.5 percent had experienced at least one traumatic event that could lead to the development of PTSD, while 47.2 percent had been subject to at least one instance of assaultive violence.

    The incidence of traumatic events rose after the study participants reached age 15, and was highest among 16- to 18-year-olds.

    Children whose teachers had rated them as having aggressive/disruptive behavior in first grade were 2.6-times more likely to have been exposed to assaultive violence by age 21, the researchers found, but were no more likely to develop PTSD as a result of the trauma.

    However, youths who had rated themselves as having high levels of depressive and anxious feelings as first-graders were 50-percent more likely to develop PTSD after experiencing a traumatic event.

    The researchers also found that children scoring in the top quartile for reading readiness in first grade were less likely to experience violence than those with lower scores.

    Children's behavior in first grade is a better gauge of their predispositions than assessment in adolescence, when their behavior has begun to result in responses that may reinforce it, Breslau and her team note.

    "The results suggest potential risk factors for PTSD that can be identified early in life and might be amenable to interventions," they conclude.

    Source: Reuters
     
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  3. piglet

    piglet Well-Known Member

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    This is an interesting study. You could easily count me in as the anxious type when I was a kid (no surprises there!). However, I had a good reading age. I basically hid in books for much of my childhood. On the upside, I can reed and right and speel ok! :smile:
     
  4. permban0077

    permban0077 Policy Enforcement Banned

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    LMAO... Piglet you are too much! I needed that.
     
  5. piglet

    piglet Well-Known Member

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    Glad to be of service!
     
  6. cookie

    cookie I'm a VIP

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    yeah, i was wreck in primary school, but not bad, although i did get paddled the first day of school. sigh. i was also a good reader, though. my first grade teacher had some problems of her own. lol
     
  7. becvan

    becvan Queen of the Blunt! Premium Member

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    Well I certainly wouldn't have fit in with this study. Avid reader way beyond my age level, defended myself but didn't really get in trouble, was considered everybody's "sunshine", hid my anxiety very well, only thing was I never spoke one word until I was four, then I never shut up again! LOL

    bec
     
  8. Jim

    Jim Well-Known Member

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    That's not Evie either, she was very happy and outgoing, and started reading at age 2.

    Jim.
     
  9. reallydown

    reallydown I'm a VIP

    Self-taught reader aat age 3...i did beat up boys bu tnto at school...though i never started fights...
     
  10. cookie

    cookie I'm a VIP

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    hmmmmmmm, our trend with reading seems to buck the study, there.
     
  11. anthony

    anthony Renovation Aficionado Founder

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    Like 99.99% of studies done, the results are biased before even found, as they implement too many criteria upon test subjects creating a bias in the range of people tested, opposed to just testing a random selection. They are looking for an answer basically, and will manipulate a test to find it, instead of allowing a test to find its own outcome.
     
  12. nov_silence

    nov_silence Well-Known Member

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    I was an avid reader. Read at two, wrote cursive at three. Reading is how I survived my childhood. Even now, I am more anxious when I don't have something juicy to read.

    Yeah, every since I took my Stats class in grad school, I have never looked at studies the same way since. So much BS being published!
     
  13. elvis

    elvis Active Member

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    ha.

    i AGREE with you all. what a load of b.s. that study is!

    and AMEN on reading to escape. i used to check out the maximum number of books at the library, and at the time it was three grocery bags full for a month.

    what's their freaking point anyways??? it just pisses me off. i think the only thing that helps PTSD is patience, support and love from other people. but i'm just freaking guessing b/c i'm not feeling it at all. i am tired of worrying if i will offend someone with my pain. (whoa, not directed at anyone here.)
     
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