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CPTSD = BPD?

OM_™

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CPTSD = BPD? is a question Rose White posed recently and there have been some other posts with titles like BPD / PTSD crossover from Stitch77777.

Rose White began with: 'This has been rolling around in my head lately and I want to lay it out and examine it with help from y’all.' I was interested in getting an AI perspective on this topic.
 
CPTSD = BPD? is a question Rose White posed recently and there have been some other posts with titles like BPD / PTSD crossover from Stitch77777.

Rose White began with: 'This has been rolling around in my head lately and I want to lay it out and examine it with help from y’all.' I was interested in getting an AI perspective on this topic.
Hello @OM_™, thank you for bringing up this important discussion. Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are distinct diagnostic entities in the DSM-5 and the ICD-11. While there can be some overlapping symptoms between the two, they are separate conditions with different diagnostic criteria.

I'm curious to hear your thoughts on the similarities and differences between CPTSD and BPD. How do you see these conditions manifesting in your own experiences or observations?
 
I have been recently diagnosed with CPTSD and MDD. I haven't been diagnosed with BPD so it's a general interest question as to how I would know one condition from the other. I did dissociate in my teens and twenties and often wondered if there were possible overlaps with that too as I often felt as if one persona was on the brink and fell into the other persona unannounced. So, it's just a general interest topic atm!
 
I have been recently diagnosed with CPTSD and MDD. I haven't been diagnosed with BPD so it's a general interest question as to how I would know one condition from the other. I did dissociate in my teens and twenties and often wondered if there were possible overlaps with that too as I often felt as if one persona was on the brink and fell into the other persona unannounced. So, it's just a general interest topic atm!
Thank you for sharing your recent diagnosis. It's understandable to have an interest in understanding the distinctions between conditions like CPTSD and BPD, especially when there may be overlapping symptoms or experiences.

Dissociation can be a common experience in both CPTSD and BPD. In CPTSD, dissociation often arises as a coping mechanism in response to past traumatic experiences. In BPD, dissociation can occur during times of stress or emotional dysregulation.

When trying to differentiate between CPTSD and BPD, it can be helpful to consider the underlying causes of your symptoms. CPTSD is often linked to repeated trauma exposure, whereas BPD is characterized by difficulties in emotion regulation, unstable relationships, and a fragile sense of self.

Can you identify specific triggers or patterns in your experiences that may align more closely with CPTSD or MDD, rather than BPD? Understanding the origins of your symptoms may provide some clarity in distinguishing between these conditions.
 
No triggers atm. Just wondering because sometimes I open my garage full of stuff that I can't remember buying and I wondered if it was a symptom of BPD or Dissociation?

My PTSD diagnosis didn't happen until I was 67yo.
 
No triggers atm. Just wondering because sometimes I open my garage full of stuff that I can't remember buying and I wondered if it was a symptom of BPD or Dissociation?

My PTSD diagnosis didn't happen until I was 67yo.
It's common for individuals with a history of trauma to experience dissociative symptoms, such as memory gaps or instances of finding unfamiliar items. These experiences can be unsettling and may be linked to both CPTSD and dissociative responses.

In the context of trauma, dissociation can serve as a protective mechanism to shield oneself from overwhelming emotions or memories. These symptoms can manifest in various ways, including memory disturbances and feeling disconnected from one's surroundings or sense of self.

Given your recent PTSD diagnosis and history of trauma, it's crucial to explore these experiences with a mental health professional to better understand their origins and significance. Have you discussed these dissociative episodes with your healthcare provider or therapist? Understanding the underlying causes can help in determining the most appropriate support and interventions for you.
 
I have had a lot of therapy about family violence; childhood sexual abuse; being pursued by a priest for sex; suicidal ideation after a girl I was interested in slept with a friend; ditto with another woman doing the same; medical trauma from being asked to terminate my son's life after a cerebral bleed at 7 days old (he survived); medical trauma from watching my son die and revived; financial trauma (ultimately, losing home ownership). With such a varied (complex) history it seems that my dissociative symptoms are treated as just part and parcel and never discussed. My therapist(s) always get stuck on my CSA and have indicated that this is a major formative issue that is unresolved.

I had a lot of 'personas' when I was young: probably about 5 - 7; now it's settled down into 2 -3 with family and medical and carer responsibilities strangling the weaker personalities. Every now and then an innocent little boy of about 5 or 6 years of age visits these now aging personas and tries to hold their hands. He (me) belongs to all of them.
 
I have had a lot of therapy about family violence; childhood sexual abuse; being pursued by a priest for sex; suicidal ideation after a girl I was interested in slept with a friend; ditto with another woman doing the same; medical trauma from being asked to terminate my son's life after a cerebral bleed at 7 days old (he survived); medical trauma from watching my son die and revived; financial trauma (ultimately, losing home ownership). With such a varied (complex) history it seems that my dissociative symptoms are treated as just part and parcel and never discussed. My therapist(s) always get stuck on my CSA and have indicated that this is a major formative issue that is unresolved.

I had a lot of 'personas' when I was young: probably about 5 - 7; now it's settled down into 2 -3 with family and medical and carer responsibilities strangling the weaker personalities. Every now and then an innocent little boy of about 5 or 6 years of age visits these now aging personas and tries to hold their hands. He (me) belongs to all of them.
It sounds like you have endured immense hardships throughout your life, encompassing a wide range of traumatic experiences. Your experiences with trauma, spanning from childhood abuse to medical crises and significant losses, have undoubtedly contributed to the complex symptoms you are facing.

The presence of multiple personas or states of being can be indicative of dissociative responses to trauma. These fragmented parts of yourself may each hold their own memories, emotions, and coping strategies as a way to protect you from overwhelming pain or distress. It's not uncommon for these parts to emerge or shift in response to different triggers or stressors.

Given the complexity of your trauma history and the manifestation of dissociative symptoms, it may be beneficial to address these experiences more directly in therapy. Exploring how these different parts of yourself interact and trying to integrate them can be a valuable aspect of healing from trauma and fostering a more cohesive sense of self.

Have you ever discussed these personas and the experiences of the young boy within your therapeutic sessions? Exploring these aspects of yourself with a therapist who is experienced in working with complex trauma and dissociation may offer new insights and avenues for healing.
 
Not really, it's been spoken of and discussed only superficially as — like you said — being symptomatic of my extensive history of childhood sexual abuse.

I now believe that my BPD has devolved into MDD (if that is possible? Is BPD fixed or fluid?). BTW: BPD was never diagnosed it was just what I thought I had when the personalties would morph in an out of each other.

A typical week or month as a young man would see me dressed differently each time, at a hard rock concert; a folk music concert; a country rock-a-billy concert; a classical music concert; a piano or classical guitar recital; an anti-vietnam war demonstration; dinner at a Krishna Temple: sitting alone in an empty church; sharing a joint with friends; watching art cinema; a wine and cheese night at an art gallery etc.

No friends from one event knew any of the other friends they were mutually exclusive.

As I can no longer afford my psychiatric sessions, this forum is all I have.
 
Not really, it's been spoken of and discussed only superficially as — like you said — being symptomatic of my extensive history of childhood sexual abuse.

I now believe that my BPD has devolved into MDD (if that is possible? Is BPD fixed or fluid?). BTW: BPD was never diagnosed it was just what I thought I had when the personalties would morph in an out of each other.

A typical week or month as a young man would see me dressed differently each time, at a hard rock concert; a folk music concert; a country rock-a-billy concert; a classical music concert; a piano or classical guitar recital; an anti-vietnam war demonstration; dinner at a Krishna Temple: sitting alone in an empty church; sharing a joint with friends; watching art cinema; a wine and cheese night at an art gallery etc.

No friends from one event knew any of the other friends they were mutually exclusive.

As I can no longer afford my psychiatric sessions, this forum is all I have.
It seems like you have navigated through a wide array of experiences and identities throughout your life, reflecting the adaptability and complexity of your inner world in response to the traumas you've faced. The shifting personas and varied interests you describe may indeed be linked to dissociative responses and the fragmentation of self that can occur in the context of trauma.

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is characterized by instability in relationships, self-image, and emotions, as well as marked impulsivity. While BPD traits can sometimes overlap with other disorders or change over time, the diagnosis itself is not fluid; however, individuals may experience shifts in symptom presentation and severity. It's not uncommon for symptoms to evolve or manifest differently over the course of one's life.

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) involves persistent feelings of sadness, loss of interest or pleasure, and other symptoms that impact one's ability to function. It's essential to address changes in your mental health symptoms, whether related to BPD or MDD, to ensure you receive appropriate support and interventions.

Since you're currently unable to afford psychiatric sessions, it's commendable that you're seeking support in this forum. Have you considered exploring community mental health resources or support groups that may offer assistance or low-cost therapy options during this time? It's crucial to prioritize your mental well-being and continue to seek out avenues for support, even during challenging financial circumstances.
 
Good idea. I will do some research and try to link to some community support. Thanks
 
Good idea. I will do some research and try to link to some community support. Thanks
You're taking a proactive step by exploring community resources to support your mental health needs, and I commend your initiative in seeking out additional sources of assistance. Connecting with community mental health services or support groups can offer valuable support and guidance as you navigate through your healing journey.

Remember to prioritize self-care and reach out for help when needed. It's essential to advocate for your well-being and seek out the resources and support that can help you on your path to healing.

If you ever feel overwhelmed or need to talk, feel free to reach out here on the forum. Your strength and resilience in facing your challenges are truly commendable. Take care of yourself, and remember that you are deserving of support and compassion.
 
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