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Workingonit

MyPTSD Pro
1. What is it called when people with C-PTSD isolate themselves from the outside world for long periods of time due to stressors and/or trauma?

2. What is it called when people with C-PTSD forget traumatic experiences?

3. Is it normal for people with C-PTSD to re-experience extreme PTSD like symptoms when recovering these memories?

4. Is it normal for these memories to be elusive and hard to think about after the flashbacks and rumination finally subside?

5. Am i at danger of forgetting them again if i dont want to?

6. If i mentally blocked some things from iraq that were traumatic but not other things i consider to be traumatic does that mean that they werent traumatic or as traumatic?
 
1. What is it called when people with C-PTSD isolate themselves from the outside world for long periods of time due to stressors and/or trauma?

2. What is it called when people with C-PTSD forget traumatic experiences?

3. Is it normal for people with C-PTSD to re-experience extreme PTSD like symptoms when recovering these memories?

4. Is it normal for these memories to be elusive and hard to think about after the flashbacks and rumination finally subside?

5. Am i at danger of forgetting them again if i dont want to?

6. If i mentally blocked some things from iraq that were traumatic but not other things i consider to be traumatic does that mean that they werent traumatic or as traumatic?
1. Isolating oneself from the outside world for extended periods of time due to stressors and trauma is often referred to as social withdrawal or social isolation. It can be a coping mechanism for individuals with C-PTSD who may feel overwhelmed and find it challenging to engage with others.

2. In the context of C-PTSD, it is not uncommon for individuals to experience memory difficulties related to traumatic experiences. This can manifest as forgetting specific details, having fragmented memories, or experiencing memory gaps. This phenomenon is known as dissociative amnesia.

3. It is not uncommon for individuals with C-PTSD to experience re-experiencing symptoms, similar to those seen in PTSD, when recovering memories of traumatic experiences. This can include flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, nightmares, and intense emotional and physiological reactions. It is important to note that these symptoms can be distressing and may require support from a mental health professional.

4. Yes, it is common for traumatic memories to feel elusive or difficult to access after the intensity of flashbacks and rumination subsides. This can be due to various factors such as dissociation, protective mechanisms of the mind, or the passage of time. It is important to approach the recovery of traumatic memories at a pace that feels safe and comfortable for you. Therapy can provide a supportive environment to explore and process these memories.

5. Remembering traumatic events is a complex process, and it can vary for each individual. If you do not want to remember certain traumatic experiences, it is essential to respect your own boundaries and pace. However, it is important to consider that unresolved trauma can have a long-term impact on your overall well-being. Working with a mental health professional can provide guidance and support in navigating this process.

6. Everyone's experience of trauma is unique and can be influenced by various factors, including individual perception, coping mechanisms, and the impact of the traumatic event. It is not uncommon for individuals to remember some aspects of the trauma while having difficulty recalling or acknowledging others. It is important to remember that the subjective nature of trauma does not diminish its impact or invalidate your experience. Consulting with a mental health professional can help you explore and process these different aspects of your traumatic experiences.
 
1. If i mentally blocked experiences from war that were traumatic but not other things from my childhood that i also consider to be traumatic does that mean that they werent traumatic or as traumatic?
 
1. If i mentally blocked experiences from war that were traumatic but not other things from my childhood that i also consider to be traumatic does that mean that they werent traumatic or as traumatic?
The experience of trauma is highly subjective and can vary from person to person. Your perception and interpretation of events, as well as coping mechanisms, can influence how you remember and process traumatic experiences.

Mental blocking, also known as repression or dissociation, can occur as a protective mechanism in response to overwhelming or traumatic events. It is important to recognize that this blocking does not necessarily indicate that the experiences were not traumatic or as traumatic as other events you remember.

Trauma can affect individuals differently, and the impact of traumatic experiences can be influenced by various factors such as the intensity, duration, proximity, and personal vulnerability. Additionally, the age at which the traumatic events occurred and the availability of support and resources can also impact how the trauma is experienced and remembered.

It may be helpful to explore these memories and their impact on your well-being with the guidance of a mental health professional experienced in trauma therapy. They can provide support in processing and understanding the complexity of your experiences, regardless of the specific memories that are accessible to you at this time.
 
1. Is it normal to develop tinnitus after breaking dissociative amnesia?

2. Is it normal for said tinnitus to come and go with rummination symptoms emotional flashbacks?
 
1. Is it normal to develop tinnitus after breaking dissociative amnesia?

2. Is it normal for said tinnitus to come and go with rummination symptoms emotional flashbacks?
1. While there is no direct causal relationship between breaking dissociative amnesia and developing tinnitus, it's not uncommon for individuals to experience changes or exacerbation of existing conditions after traumatic memory recovery or increased psychological distress. Tinnitus refers to the perception of sound in the absence of external stimuli and can have multiple causes, including stress and anxiety. However, if you have concerns about your symptoms, it is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional, such as an ear, nose, and throat specialist, for a comprehensive evaluation and appropriate treatment.

2. It is possible for tinnitus to fluctuate in intensity or be more noticeable during times of increased psychological distress, such as rumination or emotional flashbacks. Stress, anxiety, and heightened emotional states can influence the perception and attention given to tinnitus. However, it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and to explore potential contributing factors or comorbidities. They can provide guidance on managing both the emotional symptoms and tinnitus symptoms effectively.
 
If i was suicidal only before my dissociative amnesia is being ok with dying considered suicidal ideation? I rarely think about it but when i do its brief and it there is no fear and an almost longing to be with god.
 
There is no threat of me harming myself and I only think about it when confronted by other people about it. Mental health professionals seem highly fixated on it when dealing with combat vets.
 
Is it normal to experience joint pain in the knees, hips elbows and back during and after emotional flashbacks?
 
Is it normal to experience joint pain in the knees, hips elbows and back during and after emotional flashbacks?
While emotional flashbacks primarily involve intense emotional and psychological symptoms, it is possible for physical symptoms to be present as well. The experience of joint pain in the knees, hips, elbows, and back during and after emotional flashbacks can occur for several reasons.

Firstly, emotional distress can lead to heightened muscle tension and increased physical stress on the body, potentially exacerbating any existing musculoskeletal issues. Additionally, stress hormones released during emotional flashbacks can contribute to changes in pain perception and sensitivity, potentially amplifying any preexisting pain or causing new discomfort.

It is important to note that experiencing joint pain during emotional flashbacks should not be attributed solely to the emotional experience, as there may be underlying physical factors that contribute to the pain as well. Therefore, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional, such as a primary care physician or a specialist in orthopedics, to assess the possible causes of joint pain and explore appropriate management strategies.

In the meantime, self-care practices such as relaxation techniques, mindfulness exercises, gentle exercise, and maintaining good posture may help alleviate some of the discomfort associated with joint pain. However, it is crucial to prioritize professional medical advice for a comprehensive evaluation and personalized treatment recommendations.
 
Is it normal for breaking dissociative amnesia to give relief to Gastrointestinal issues and asthma?
 
Is it normal for breaking dissociative amnesia to give relief to Gastrointestinal issues and asthma?
There is a complex relationship between psychological and physical health, and it is possible for improvements in one area to have positive effects in other areas. Breaking dissociative amnesia and addressing related trauma can have a positive impact on overall well-being, including potentially alleviating some symptoms of gastrointestinal issues and asthma.

Chronic stress and trauma can have a significant impact on the body, leading to dysregulation of the immune system, inflammation, and changes in the gut-brain axis. Addressing and resolving trauma can help reduce stress levels and promote overall healing, which may contribute to improvements in various physical symptoms.

However, it is important to recognize that every individual's experience is unique, and the effects of trauma recovery on physical health can vary. It is advisable to consult with healthcare professionals, such as a gastroenterologist or pulmonologist, who can provide a thorough evaluation and personalized guidance regarding the specific symptoms you are experiencing. They can help determine the underlying causes of gastrointestinal issues and asthma and develop appropriate treatment strategies, which may include addressing any psychological factors that could be contributing to the symptoms.

Integrated, multidisciplinary care that addresses both physical and psychological aspects of health is often beneficial in achieving holistic well-being.
 
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