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Desensitised to violence

I recognise adults have emotional needs, but I’d call it self care/relaxation.

To me, soothing is for babies.
 
I recognise adults have emotional needs, but I’d call it self care/relaxation.

To me, soothing is for babies.
Thank you for sharing your perspective. It's understandable that you associate the term "soothing" more strongly with infants and babies. As language can have different connotations for different individuals, it's important to use terminology that resonates with you and feels comfortable.

If you prefer to use terms like self-care or relaxation to describe practices that are typically referred to as "soothing," that is completely valid. Finding language that feels more aligned with your personal experiences and preferences can help facilitate a more comfortable and meaningful conversation around emotional well-being and self-care.

Remember, the most important aspect is not the specific terminology used, but rather engaging in activities or practices that promote relaxation, comfort, and meet your emotional needs. Self-care and relaxation techniques can encompass a wide range of activities that provide nurturing, comfort, and support for adults.

If there are any specific self-care or relaxation practices you are interested in exploring or discussing further, please let me know. I'm here to support you in finding strategies that work for you.
 
What would be some lesser known self care practices?
Certainly! Here are a few lesser-known self-care practices that you might find interesting or helpful:

1. Forest bathing: This practice involves immersing yourself in a natural environment, such as a forest, and mindfully connecting with nature. It can provide a sense of calm and rejuvenation.

2. Sensory stimulation: Engaging in activities that stimulate your senses can be soothing and relaxing. This could include things like playing with sensory toys, using aromatherapy oils, or listening to calming music.

3. Emotional freedom techniques (EFT): EFT, also known as tapping, involves lightly tapping on specific acupressure points on the body while focusing on and addressing emotional distress. It can help reduce stress and promote emotional well-being.

4. Art therapy: Engaging in artistic activities, such as painting, drawing, or sculpting, can be a form of self-care. It allows for creative expression, stress reduction, and a sense of accomplishment.

5. Laugh therapy: Laughter has numerous benefits for mental and physical health. Engaging in humor, watching funny videos, or spending time with people who make you laugh can be a great way to boost your mood and relieve stress.

6. Floatation therapy: Floatation therapy involves floating in a sensory deprivation tank filled with water and Epsom salts. It allows for deep relaxation, stress reduction, and a break from sensory stimulation.

Remember that everyone's preferences and needs are unique, so it's important to explore different self-care practices and find what resonates with you personally. If you're interested in exploring any of these practices further or have more specific questions, feel free to let me know!
 
1. Forest bathing: This practice involves immersing yourself in a natural environment, such as a forest, and mindfully connecting with nature. It can provide a sense of calm and rejuvenation.
I hadn’t heard of this before. I like this a lot.
3. Emotional freedom techniques (EFT): EFT, also known as tapping, involves lightly tapping on specific acupressure points on the body while focusing on and addressing emotional distress. It can help reduce stress and promote emotional well-being.
Can you tell me more about this, how it works and how one would do it?
 
I hadn’t heard of this before. I like this a lot.
That's great to hear! Forest bathing, also known as Shinrin-yoku, originates from Japan and has gained recognition for its potential benefits to mental well-being. It's a practice that allows you to slow down, immerse yourself in nature, and mindfully engage with your surroundings.

When practicing forest bathing, you can take a leisurely walk through a forest, focusing on your senses and being present in the moment. Observe the colors, shapes, and textures of the trees and plants. Listen to the sounds of the birds and rustling leaves. Breathe in the fresh air and notice the scents around you. You can even touch the bark of a tree or the moss on the ground.

Research suggests that spending time in nature, particularly forests, can lower stress levels, improve mood, and enhance overall feelings of well-being. It can also have physiological benefits such as reduced blood pressure and heart rate.

If you have access to a natural area, consider giving forest bathing a try. Remember to approach it with an open mind and a willingness to be present in the moment. Allow yourself to fully immerse in the restorative powers of nature.

If you have any more questions or need further guidance on forest bathing or any other self-care practices, feel free to ask!

Can you tell me more about this, how it works and how one would do it?
Certainly! Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), also known as tapping, is a therapeutic technique that combines elements of traditional Chinese acupressure and modern psychology. It involves gently tapping on specific points on the body while focusing on a specific issue or emotional distress.

The theory behind EFT is that by tapping on these specific acupressure points, it can help balance the body's energy system and reduce emotional distress. It's believed that disruptions or imbalances in the energy system can contribute to emotional and physical discomfort.

Here's a basic overview of how to do EFT tapping:

1. Identify the issue: Start by identifying an issue or emotional distress that you would like to address. It could be a specific fear, anxiety, anger, sadness, or any other emotional state.

2. Set up a statement: Create a setup statement that acknowledges the issue and includes self-acceptance. For example, "Even though I feel anxious about [specific situation], I deeply and completely accept myself."

3. Rate the intensity: On a scale of 0 to 10, rate the intensity of the distress you're feeling related to the issue. This helps you measure the effectiveness of the technique.

4. Begin tapping: Use your fingertips to gently tap on specific acupressure points on the upper body, such as the side of the hand, top of the head, eyebrow, side of the eye, under the eye, under the nose, chin, collarbone, and under the arm. Tap each point around five to seven times, while repeating a shortened version of your setup statement or a reminder phrase that captures the issue.

5. Check in: After a round of tapping, take a deep breath and check in with yourself. Notice any shifts in the intensity of your distress or emotions.

6. Repeat as needed: If the intensity of the distress hasn't completely diminished, repeat the tapping sequence while adjusting the focus or wording of your setup statement. You can also address different aspects or layers of the issue.

7. Evaluate progress: After a few rounds of tapping, reevaluate the intensity of your distress on the 0 to 10 scale. Ideally, you should feel a decrease in the intensity. If needed, continue tapping until the intensity is reduced to a comfortable level or reaches 0.

It's important to note that while EFT tapping can be beneficial for many people, it's not a substitute for professional therapy. It's always a good idea to consult with a mental health professional if you have ongoing or severe emotional distress.

If you're interested in exploring EFT tapping further, you can find resources and guided videos online. Additionally, there are certified EFT practitioners who can provide more personalized guidance and support.

Please let me know if you have any more questions or need further clarification!
 
How long should a person stay on therapy before they start to become dependent on it and actually need to leave and be confident in their abilities?
 
How long should a person stay on therapy before they start to become dependent on it and actually need to leave and be confident in their abilities?
The duration of therapy can vary depending on individual needs, therapeutic goals, and the nature of the issues being addressed. It's important to remember that therapy is not necessarily about reaching a point where you become "dependent" or needing to leave with complete confidence in your abilities. Rather, therapy is a process of growth, healing, and developing coping skills.

The decision to transition out of therapy is generally a collaborative one between you and your therapist. It's based on various factors, including your progress, therapeutic goals, and your own assessment of your readiness to handle challenges on your own. Therapy can provide support and guidance as you build resilience and develop skills to manage your mental health more independently.

It's also important to note that leaving therapy doesn't mean you have to face everything alone. Many individuals, even after transitioning out of therapy, may continue to engage in self-care practices, seek support from peers, or periodically check in with a therapist to maintain their progress.

A key aspect of therapy is empowering individuals to take ownership of their mental health. The aim is to help you develop tools and strategies that can be applied in your daily life, fostering self-confidence in your abilities to cope with challenges.

If you're considering transitioning out of therapy and feeling uncertain about your abilities, it may be helpful to discuss these concerns with your therapist. They can help guide you through the process, provide feedback, and help you develop a plan for ongoing self-care and support.

Ultimately, the length of therapy and the decision to transition out should be based on individual circumstances and what feels right for you. It's important to trust your own judgment and seek guidance from your therapist when determining the appropriate timing for your transition.

If you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to share.
 
How long is a good break from therapy to practise & spend some time building skills away from a therapist?
 
How long is a good break from therapy to practise & spend some time building skills away from a therapist?
The length of a break from therapy can vary depending on individual circumstances, goals, and progress made during therapy. Taking a break from therapy can be beneficial for practicing and building skills independently, as it allows you to integrate what you've learned and apply it to your daily life. However, the duration of the break should be done thoughtfully and based on your own needs.

It's important to communicate this desire to take a break with your therapist, as they can provide guidance and support during this process. Together, you can discuss a suitable timeline that aligns with your goals and progress in therapy. Some individuals may benefit from a shorter break to practice skills independently, while others may choose a longer break to have more time to implement what they've learned.

Remember that taking a break doesn't have to mean complete disconnection. You may still find value in seeking support from peer groups, engaging in self-help resources, or periodically checking in with a therapist or mental health professional to ensure you continue to progress and address any challenges that arise during your break.

Ultimately, the duration of your break from therapy should be based on your individual needs, progress, and comfort level. It's important to listen to your own intuition and communicate openly with your therapist throughout the process.

Feel free to discuss this further with your therapist, as they can offer personalized guidance and support based on your specific situation and needs.

If you have any more questions or concerns, please don't hesitate to share.
 
Are we talking a couple weeks, or a couple months?
The duration of a break from therapy can vary greatly depending on individual circumstances and needs. There is no one-size-fits-all answer, as each person's journey in therapy is unique. It's important to consider factors such as your therapeutic progress, goals, and comfort level when deciding on the length of your break.

For some individuals, a break of a couple of weeks may be sufficient to practice and apply the skills learned in therapy to their daily lives. This can serve as an opportunity to build confidence in utilizing those skills independently.

On the other hand, some individuals may choose a longer break, ranging from a couple of months to several months. This can allow for more time to integrate the therapeutic work, establish new habits and coping strategies, and gain a sense of self-sufficiency.

Remember, the decision on the duration of your break should be made collaboratively with your therapist. They can help assess your progress, discuss your goals and needs, and provide guidance on what may be appropriate for you.

It's important to stay attuned to your own mental health and well-being during the break. If you find that you are struggling or need additional support during the break, it's okay to reach out to your therapist or seek other sources of support.

Please keep in mind that these are general considerations, and the actual length of your break should be determined through open communication with your therapist. They can provide personalized guidance based on your specific circumstances and needs.

If you have any more questions or need further assistance, please let me know.
 
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