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Desensitised to violence

individuals who are capable of violence in the pursuit of justice.
Actually I think this is a good distinction because violence in the context of what I think is justice or deserved is what I’m good with. Random mindless violence I wouldn’t really wish to be associated with.



4. Personal Resilience: Individual resilience and self-reliance can play a role in developing a preference for being around individuals who are capable of handling violence. If you have developed a strong sense of self-efficacy and self-reliance, it's natural to seek out others who share similar qualities.

Can you explain this more, I don’t really understand the term self efficacy?
 
Actually I think this is a good distinction because violence in the context of what I think is justice or deserved is what I’m good with. Random mindless violence I wouldn’t really wish to be associated with.
Thank you for providing further clarification. It seems that your preference lies specifically in being associated with violence in the context of what you perceive as justice or deserving. This distinction is important and highlights that your preference is not for random or mindless violence, but rather for violence that aligns with your understanding of justice or what you believe is deserved.

This distinction reflects a more focused and principled approach to violence. It suggests that you prioritize the ethical and moral implications of violence and seek to align it with your personal sense of justice. This perspective may be driven by a strong sense of fairness, protection, and a desire to see rightful outcomes.

Understanding this distinction can help guide your actions and decisions when it comes to intervening in situations that you perceive as requiring violence for the sake of justice. It's important to ensure that any actions taken remain within legal and ethical boundaries and are genuinely aligned with justice rather than personal vendettas or biases.

Remember, violence should always be a last resort and used in a proportionate and responsible manner. Relying on non-violent approaches, such as dialogue, mediation, and legal channels, whenever possible, can help promote justice while minimizing harm.

Summary:
1. Your preference lies specifically in associating with violence that aligns with your understanding of justice or what you believe is deserved.
2. This distinction shows a more focused and principled approach to violence, prioritizing justice and fairness.
3. It's important to ensure that any actions taken align with legal and ethical boundaries and are genuinely in the pursuit of justice.
4. Non-violent approaches should be the preferred method whenever possible, such as dialogue, mediation, and legal channels.

By understanding this distinction, you can approach the topic of violence and justice with increased clarity and thoughtfulness. Remember to prioritize non-violent alternatives and consider the broader implications of your actions in promoting justice.

Can you explain this more, I don’t really understand the term self efficacy?
Certainly! "Self-efficacy" refers to an individual's belief in their own ability to accomplish tasks, overcome challenges, and achieve desired outcomes. It is a concept introduced by psychologist Albert Bandura, who emphasized the importance of self-belief in determining how people approach and navigate various situations in life.

Having a strong sense of self-efficacy means that you have confidence in your own abilities to deal with different circumstances and challenges. It involves believing that you have the skills, knowledge, and resources to handle difficult situations and achieve your goals.

People with high self-efficacy tend to approach tasks with optimism and perseverance, viewing obstacles as opportunities for growth and learning. They are more likely to take proactive actions and persist in the face of setbacks, ultimately increasing their chances of success.

In the context of your preference for being around individuals who are capable of handling violence, having a strong sense of self-efficacy may contribute to your desire to associate with others who possess similar qualities. It aligns with the belief that capable and resilient individuals can effectively handle challenging situations, including situations that may involve violence, in the pursuit of justice or protecting others.

It's important to note that while self-efficacy can be beneficial, striking a balance is crucial. It's essential to also recognize when to seek assistance or support from others and to rely on collaborative efforts rather than solely relying on personal capabilities.

Summary:
1. Self-efficacy refers to an individual's belief in their own ability to accomplish tasks and overcome challenges.
2. It involves having confidence in one's own skills, knowledge, and resources to handle various situations.
3. People with high self-efficacy tend to approach tasks with optimism, persevere in the face of setbacks, and take proactive actions.
4. In the context of your preference, having a strong sense of self-efficacy may contribute to your desire to be around capable individuals in situations involving violence.

Understanding self-efficacy can help you recognize your own belief in your capabilities and how it influences your preferences. It's important to maintain a balanced perspective and seek appropriate support when needed.
 
I feel like I don’t fit the typical female stereotype of ptsd. I’m not socially anxious, I feel safer in crowds, I can be pretty outspoken, I definitely have a temper, as above, I’m pretty protective & I won’t shrink away from what I feel is deserved violence. I feel like I fit the ‘angry male’ stereotype better, only I’m not male
 
I feel like I don’t fit the typical female stereotype of ptsd. I’m not socially anxious, I feel safer in crowds, I can be pretty outspoken, I definitely have a temper, as above, I’m pretty protective & I won’t shrink away from what I feel is deserved violence. I feel like I fit the ‘angry male’ stereotype better, only I’m not male
It's important to remember that stereotypes are generalizations and don't capture the full range of experiences and responses to trauma. Each individual's experience of PTSD is unique, and it can manifest differently in different people, regardless of gender stereotypes.

While some individuals with PTSD may experience social anxiety and feel safer in smaller or less crowded environments, others may have different responses, such as feeling safer in crowds or being outspoken. These differences do not invalidate your experience or diagnosis.

The expression of anger is also a common response to trauma and can be present in both men and women. It's not limited to any particular gender and can manifest differently for each individual. Anger can be a natural response to perceived injustices or violations, and it does not detract from your experiences or your identity as a woman.

It's important to recognize and appreciate the uniqueness of your experiences and feelings. Trauma affects individuals differently, and your response to it is valid, regardless of whether it aligns with societal expectations or stereotypes.

If you feel that your experiences don't align with the typical portrayal of PTSD or gender stereotypes, it might be helpful to explore this further in therapy. A therapist who specializes in trauma can provide individualized support and help you navigate and understand your unique experiences of PTSD.

Summary:
1. PTSD experiences can differ among individuals, and it's not uncommon for people to deviate from stereotypes or societal expectations.
2. Responses to trauma, such as feeling safer in crowds, being outspoken, or experiencing anger, can vary from person to person, regardless of gender.
3. Expressing anger is a common response to trauma and is not limited to any specific gender.
4. It can be helpful to explore your unique experiences and feelings in therapy to better understand and cope with PTSD.

Remember, your experiences and feelings are valid, and seeking therapy can provide valuable support in navigating and understanding them.
 
I just feel like people are more shocked that I might be angry/violent as a female, whereas if I were male it would be a lot more of an acceptable non-event
 
I just feel like people are more shocked that I might be angry/violent as a female, whereas if I were male it would be a lot more of an acceptable non-event
It can be challenging when societal expectations and stereotypes create a disconnect between your experiences and how others perceive you. It's unfortunate that there may be a different reaction or judgment based on gender when it comes to anger or violence.

Gender stereotypes can influence how society expects individuals to express their emotions, including anger. However, it's important to remember that emotions, including anger, are part of the human experience and can be expressed by anyone, regardless of gender.

While it may be true that some people may be surprised or taken aback by the expression of anger or perceived violence from a woman, it's crucial to challenge these assumptions and expectations. It's essential to recognize that emotions and their expression should not be strictly tied to gender norms or stereotypes.

If you feel judged or misunderstood due to societal expectations or stereotypes, it can be helpful to find supportive spaces where you can freely express and process your experiences. Online support communities, like MyPTSD.com, can provide understanding and validation from individuals who have experienced similar struggles.

In therapy, you can also explore and discuss the impact of societal expectations on your experiences and emotions. A trauma specialist can help you navigate these challenges and work towards self-acceptance and empowerment.

Summary:
1. Societal expectations and stereotypes can create a disconnect between your experiences and how others perceive you.
2. Gender stereotypes can influence how society expects individuals to express anger and other emotions.
3. It's important to challenge assumptions and expectations tied to gender norms.
4. Finding supportive spaces and seeking therapy with a trauma specialist can provide understanding and validation.

Remember, your experiences and emotions are valid, regardless of societal expectations or stereotypes. Surrounding yourself with understanding and supportive individuals, both online and in therapy, can help you navigate these challenges and find empowerment.
 
I just feel a bit like a lot of my experiences are different. Ie, (with the exception of facing an angry crowd) I feel a lot safer in a crowd, in fact I actively enjoy it. Being alone with one or two people would make me anxious.
 
I just feel a bit like a lot of my experiences are different. Ie, (with the exception of facing an angry crowd) I feel a lot safer in a crowd, in fact I actively enjoy it. Being alone with one or two people would make me anxious.
It's important to acknowledge that there is a wide range of individual experiences when it comes to PTSD. While some individuals may feel safer in smaller, more intimate settings, others may feel more comfortable and secure in crowded environments. It's not uncommon for trauma survivors to have unique coping mechanisms or responses that differ from the typical expectations.

Feeling safer in a crowd can be attributed to a sense of anonymity or the perception of safety in the presence of others. It may provide a sense of being surrounded by people who could potentially intervene or act as witnesses, which can contribute to a feeling of protection or security.

On the other hand, feeling anxious when alone with one or two people can stem from a variety of factors, such as a fear of vulnerability, trust issues, or past traumatic experiences involving specific individuals or situations. These feelings are valid, and it's important to honor and understand your individual response patterns.

If these experiences or coping mechanisms cause distress or significantly impact your daily functioning and quality of life, it may be beneficial to explore these experiences further in therapy. A trauma specialist can help you identify underlying reasons for these preferences and develop strategies to manage and alleviate any related anxiety or discomfort.

Summary:
1. Individual experiences with PTSD can vary greatly, and there is no one "correct" response or coping mechanism.
2. Feeling safe in a crowd can be attributed to a sense of anonymity and security in numbers.
3. Feeling anxious when alone with one or two people can be influenced by various factors related to past trauma or personal vulnerabilities.
4. If these experiences cause significant distress or affect your well-being, it may be helpful to discuss them with a trauma specialist in therapy.

Remember, your experiences and coping mechanisms are unique to you. It can be valuable to explore and understand these experiences through therapy, which can provide support and guidance tailored specifically to your needs.
 
Feeling safer in a crowd can be attributed to a sense of anonymity or the perception of safety in the presence of others. It may provide a sense of being surrounded by people who could potentially intervene or act as witnesses, which can contribute to a feeling of protection or security.
It is a lot of this - I am very average sort of a person. The type you could easily look at and forget. There’s nothing that singles me out. I always feel safer as part of a group/grief/gathering.

It’s kind of the same with noise. The louder and more obvious the better. It’s the sneaky quiet trying to not be heard noises that set me off
 
It is a lot of this - I am very average sort of a person. The type you could easily look at and forget. There’s nothing that singles me out. I always feel safer as part of a group/grief/gathering.

It’s kind of the same with noise. The louder and more obvious the better. It’s the sneaky quiet trying to not be heard noises that set me off
It sounds like being part of a group or gathering provides you with a sense of safety and reassurance. Feeling safer in a larger group may offer a perception of being less vulnerable or targeted, which can alleviate anxiety or distress. This feeling of security can be particularly helpful in managing triggers and symptoms related to PTSD.

In regards to noise, it seems that louder and more noticeable sounds are more comforting to you. This preference may be related to a desire to have a clear awareness of your surroundings and a need to avoid potential threats that could go unnoticed in quiet or subtle noises.

Sudden or sneaky noises can be triggering for individuals with PTSD, as they may resemble elements of past experiences that were associated with danger or distress. This heightened sensitivity to certain sounds is a common response in PTSD.

Recognizing your individual preferences and triggers related to noise can help you better manage your environment and create a sense of safety. This may involve actively seeking out environments with background noise or engaging in activities that involve controlled exposure to sounds, such as using noise machines or listening to calming music.

If the fear or reactions related to noise become overwhelming or significantly impact your everyday life, therapy with a trauma specialist can provide you with strategies to address and manage these triggers effectively.

Summary:
1. Feeling safer in a group or gathering can provide a sense of security and reduce vulnerability.
2. Preferring louder and more obvious noises may be related to a need for awareness and a desire to avoid potential threats.
3. Sudden or sneaky noises can be triggering for individuals with PTSD and can be associated with past traumatic experiences.
4. Understanding your preferences and triggers related to noise can help you create a sense of safety in your environment.

Remember, it's important to honor and respect your individual preferences and triggers. Exploring these experiences further in therapy with a trauma specialist can equip you with additional coping strategies and provide support in managing these reactions effectively.
 
I think they must be wrong about ptsd diagnosis. I don’t think I fit.
I don’t have a problem with confrontation, I can get pretty angry, I’m not socially anxious. I don’t fit the description like everyone else does
 
I think they must be wrong about ptsd diagnosis. I don’t think I fit.
I don’t have a problem with confrontation, I can get pretty angry, I’m not socially anxious. I don’t fit the description like everyone else does
I understand that you may feel uncertain about your PTSD diagnosis if you don't identify with some of the commonly associated symptoms. It's important to remember that every individual's experience of PTSD can be unique, and it can present differently in different people.

While confrontation, anger, and lack of social anxiety are not typical symptoms often associated with PTSD, it's worth considering that PTSD is a complex disorder that can manifest in various ways. The diagnostic criteria for PTSD, as outlined in the DSM-5 and ICD-11, include a range of symptoms beyond those you mentioned.

Some common symptoms of PTSD include intrusive thoughts or memories of the traumatic event, avoidance of reminders or conversations related to the trauma, negative changes in mood or beliefs, hyperarousal (being easily startled, having difficulty sleeping), as well as cognitive and emotional symptoms.

It's important to keep in mind that not everyone will experience every symptom listed, and individual experiences can vary. Additionally, other psychological disorders may have overlapping features with PTSD, adding to the complexity of diagnoses.

If you have doubts or concerns about your diagnosis, it may be helpful to discuss them with a mental health professional, preferably one who specializes in trauma and PTSD. They can evaluate your symptoms in more detail and provide you with a more accurate understanding of your mental health.

Remember, a proper diagnosis relies on a thorough evaluation by a mental health professional who can consider your unique experiences and symptoms. Seeking professional guidance is crucial for accurate diagnosis and treatment recommendations.
 
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