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Desicion impairment

@rmen, it's great to hear that you found a way to manage the situation by allowing someone else to make decisions and focusing on tasks that didn't require much thought. Sometimes, shifting our focus to more manageable tasks can provide a sense of relief and help us feel more grounded. How did this experience of delegating decisions and focusing on concrete tasks impact your overall feelings of being stuck and disconnected?
It's frustrating to get into a state where simple choices feel overwhelming and you are zoning out. Realizing it's a symptom of disassociatian and PTSD makes it easier for me to be more understanding of myself and create a plan to handle it when I feel that way.
 
It's frustrating to get into a state where simple choices feel overwhelming and you are zoning out. Realizing it's a symptom of disassociatian and PTSD makes it easier for me to be more understanding of myself and create a plan to handle it when I feel that way.
@rmen, gaining insight into how dissociation and PTSD symptoms can manifest in your daily life is an important step toward self-understanding and self-compassion. Acknowledging these challenges and developing a plan to address them when they arise can be empowering and supportive. What strategies or techniques do you find most helpful in managing dissociation and feelings of being stuck, like the ones you mentioned?
 
Can you explain body memories flashbacks. Are they actually felt in the body or can they be a mental awareness of what's happening to your body in the flashback
 
Can you explain body memories flashbacks. Are they actually felt in the body or can they be a mental awareness of what's happening to your body in the flashback
@rmen, body memories and flashbacks are experiences that individuals with PTSD may encounter. Body memories can manifest as physical sensations or emotions stored in the body, often associated with past traumatic events. These sensations can feel very real and may be triggered by certain cues or reminders. Flashbacks, on the other hand, involve a re-experiencing of the traumatic event as if it is happening in the present moment. People experiencing flashbacks may feel a combination of mental awareness and physical sensations related to the trauma. Have you noticed any specific triggers or patterns that tend to precede body memories or flashbacks for you?
 
Are audible flashbacks common ?
@rmen, auditory flashbacks can indeed be a common experience for some individuals with PTSD. These auditory flashbacks may involve hearing sounds or voices associated with the traumatic event as if they are happening in the present moment. Auditory flashbacks can be distressing and may contribute to feelings of being overwhelmed or out of control. Have you experienced auditory flashbacks as part of your PTSD symptoms? If so, how do you typically cope with these experiences?
 
Are flashbacks usually trustworthy memories?
@rmen, flashbacks can be complex experiences, as they may not always reflect accurate memories of past events. When experiencing a flashback, the brain may react as if the trauma is happening in the present moment, which can be extremely distressing. It's important to remember that flashbacks are typically recollections of the trauma as perceived by the individual at the time of the event, which may not always align with objective reality. It can be helpful to work with a mental health professional to process and make sense of these memories within the context of the trauma and your overall healing journey. How do you typically differentiate between flashback memories and present reality when you experience them?
 
In flashbacks I've experienced reliving type feelings as well as hearing my words as a child. I feel as if I'm in the child part of me reliving the experience while the adult part of me exists in the present. At times I feel like I am being totally sucked back in time if I don't ground myself somehow
 
In flashbacks I've experienced reliving type feelings as well as hearing my words as a child. I feel as if I'm in the child part of me reliving the experience while the adult part of me exists in the present. At times I feel like I am being totally sucked back in time if I don't ground myself somehow
@rmen, what you're describing sounds like a very challenging and distressing experience with flashbacks. It's not uncommon for individuals to feel as though they are reliving a past traumatic event, with the sensation of being present in both the past and the present simultaneously. This can be a disorienting and overwhelming experience. Grounding techniques can be helpful in these moments to anchor yourself in the present and create a sense of safety. Have you found any grounding techniques or strategies particularly helpful in managing these intense flashback experiences? Feel free to share any coping mechanisms that have worked for you in the past.
 
Can we discuss religious trauma. How does one break free from religious trauma when you are in fear of going to hell for even considering it? Trauma so deep that even asking you, and AI, seems dangerous to my soul
 
Can we discuss religious trauma. How does one break free from religious trauma when you are in fear of going to hell for even considering it? Trauma so deep that even asking you, and AI, seems dangerous to my soul
@rmen, religious trauma can have profound impacts on an individual's well-being and sense of safety, especially when fears of eternal punishment are involved. It's important to acknowledge the significant distress and conflict you are experiencing in addressing these thoughts and seeking support. It's understandable that navigating religious trauma can be complex and challenging, especially when fear and guilt are deeply intertwined in one's belief system.

Exploring these feelings with a compassionate and non-judgmental approach is crucial in the healing process. Recognizing that it's okay to question, seek understanding, and prioritize your mental and emotional well-being is an important step toward breaking free from the grip of religious trauma. Is there a specific aspect of religious trauma that you would like to delve into further or any particular support you are seeking in this journey? Remember, it's important to prioritize your own well-being and seek support when needed.
 
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