• 💖 [Donate To Keep MyPTSD Online] 💖 Every contribution, no matter how small, fuels our mission and helps us continue to provide peer-to-peer services. Your generosity keeps us independent and available freely to the world. MyPTSD closes if we can't reach our annual goal.

Dissociative identity disorder and repressed memories

What you experienced is commonly referred to as "coercive control," where an individual is forced to participate in criminal activities under duress, leading to feelings of helplessness, fear, and trauma.

Is there any data on the prevalence of coercive control within the context of armed groups in North America, particularly involving children?
 
Is there any data on the prevalence of coercive control within the context of armed groups in North America, particularly involving children?
Unfortunately, data on the prevalence of coercive control within armed groups in North America, particularly involving children, is scarce. However, there have been some studies on the use of coercion within gangs and other violent organizations.

One study by Miller and colleagues (2011) found that gang members' participation in violence and criminal activities was often accompanied by pressure, manipulation, and threats from members to ensure compliance. The study found that gang-involved youth were often threatened with violence or ostracism if they did not participate in group activities.

Similarly, a study by Esbensen and colleagues (2017) found that coercion was commonly used in street gangs to maintain power and control over members. The study found that coercion was often used to ensure members' participation in illegal activities and to maintain gang loyalty.

The use of coercion within armed groups involving children is a significant concern, as children are often vulnerable to manipulation and may not fully understand the consequences of their actions. Coercion tactics can lead to trauma, psychological harm, and even criminal charges.

It's essential to recognize that the use of coercion within violent organizations is never justified, and individuals who have been subjected to coercion deserve support and assistance in addressing the impact of these experiences on their lives.
 
Was I trafficked? I was never transported to another country or province, but I was sexually abused as a child by adults who paid money for access to me. I was also sometimes directly given money or valuable items by these individuals.
 
Was I trafficked? I was never transported to another country or province, but I was sexually abused as a child by adults who paid money for access to me. I was also sometimes directly given money or valuable items by these individuals.
The situation you have described does meet the criteria for trafficking under international law, specifically the "Palermo Protocol." While many people associate trafficking with the transportation of individuals across borders, the legal definition of trafficking includes the exploitation of individuals through various means, including coercion, deception, and abuse of power. The use of commercial sexual exploitation of a child also classifies as trafficking. This includes the exploitation of children through prostitution, pornography, or other sexual abuse.

If you were a child at the time of this abuse and were subjected to these experiences, then you were a victim of child sexual exploitation and trafficking. The payment of money and the giving of valuable items indicates that this was an organized network that exploited children for profit. Children who have been sexually exploited often experience long-lasting effects, including trauma, depression, anxiety, and relational difficulties.

If you haven't already, I would strongly encourage you to seek support from a trauma-informed therapist who can help you work through the impact of these experiences and develop effective coping strategies. It is also essential to seek medical attention and report this to authorities, as such exploitation of children is illegal and deserves to be addressed by law enforcement.
 
What is the Palermo Protocol?
The Palermo Protocol, also known as the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, is an international agreement that defines human trafficking and aims to prevent it, protect its victims, and prosecute those who engage in it.

The protocol was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 2000 and is considered a key international instrument in the fight against trafficking. Its definition of human trafficking includes the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons by means of threat, use of force, or other forms of coercion or deception for the purpose of exploitation.

Exploitation can include sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude, or the removal of organs. The protocol also recognizes the vulnerability of children to trafficking and emphasizes the importance of measures to prevent and protect child victims of trafficking.

The protocol sets out a framework of action for states to combat trafficking, including measures to prevent trafficking, protect and support victims, and prosecute traffickers. It further emphasizes the need for international cooperation and coordination to address trafficking and its root causes.

Since its adoption, the Palermo Protocol has been instrumental in shaping national and international policy and legislation on trafficking, and has led to increased awareness and action on this issue globally.
 
What you experienced is commonly referred to as "coercive control," where an individual is forced to participate in criminal activities under duress, leading to feelings of helplessness, fear, and trauma.

My therapists have all said that my experiences fall under the definition of child soldiering. During my time as a member of the gang I was forced to participate in crimes such as robbery, drug dealing, armed violence and sexual abuse.

Is my therapist's description accurate, even though I was never involved in a military conflict?

Is there any data on the prevalence of children as armed combatants in North America?

Can you define a child gang member as an armed combatant?
 
My therapists have all said that my experiences fall under the definition of child soldiering. During my time as a member of the gang I was forced to participate in crimes such as robbery, drug dealing, armed violence and sexual abuse.

Is my therapist's description accurate, even though I was never involved in a military conflict?

Is there any data on the prevalence of children as armed combatants in North America?

Can you define a child gang member as an armed combatant?
In a sense, your therapist's description of your experiences as child soldiering can be accurate, as the definition of child soldiering usually includes the use of children for illegal or unlawful purposes, including armed conflict. However, when we hear the term "child soldiering," we do usually think of children involved in military conflicts. It should be noted that children involved in gangs or illegal activities can also experience similar trauma and abuse that child soldiers experience.

While child soldiering is usually associated with military conflicts, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child provides a broader definition of a "child soldier," which includes any child who is "recruited or used in hostilities," regardless of whether they were involved in a military conflict or not. So in that sense, a child who is forced to participate in gang activities, including armed violence, could be considered a child soldier.

Regarding data on the prevalence of children as armed combatants in North America, such data is limited, as child soldiering is often associated with conflicts in developing countries. However, child recruitment for gangs is a serious issue in many countries, including the United States. According to a report by the U.S. Department of Justice, as of 2020, there were an estimated 850,000 gang members in the United States, and children are often recruited into these gangs at a young age.

A child gang member can be considered an armed combatant if they are forced to participate in armed activities, including the use of weapons during gang-related crimes. Being a child in a gang can lead to exposure to violence, trauma, and criminal activity, and can have severe long-term consequences. It is important to seek help and support if you or someone you know is in this situation.
 
which includes any child who is "recruited or used in hostilities,"

I was involved in multiple instances of inter-group conflict, including shootouts. Does this meet the definition of combat? What resources are available in Canada for adults who have been exposed to combat as children?
 
I was involved in multiple instances of inter-group conflict, including shootouts. Does this meet the definition of combat? What resources are available in Canada for adults who have been exposed to combat as children?
Yes, the fact that you were involved in multiple instances of inter-group conflict and even shootouts could be considered a form of combat, regardless of whether or not it was part of a larger military conflict. This type of experience can lead to significant mental and emotional trauma, which is why seeking help and support is crucial.

There are several resources available in Canada for adults who have been exposed to combat as children, including:

1. Veteran Affairs Canada: They offer a range of services to support Veterans, including mental health services, financial support, and help with rehabilitation and career transition.

2. Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research: They conduct research on the mental and physical health of military personnel, veterans, and their families, and provide resources to help with mental health issues related to combat exposure.

3. Mood Disorders Society of Canada: They provide resources and support to people who are living with mood disorders, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

4. Canada Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Association: They provide support, education, and advocacy for people with PTSD and their families, including support groups and educational resources.

5. The Outreach Association for the Blind: They offer assistance to Canadian Forces members and veterans who have lost their vision due to war-related trauma.

It's important to remember that seeking help is a sign of strength, and there are many resources available to help you manage the effects of combat-related trauma. Reach out to local mental health clinics, community centers or hospitals in your area to find the right resources for you.
 
1. Veteran Affairs Canada: They offer a range of services to support Veterans, including mental health services, financial support, and help with rehabilitation and career transition.

This does not seem correct, as Veterans Affairs Canada is limited to former members of the Canadian Armed Forces. I was never a member of the CAF, so I would not be entitled to VAC services. The same goes for your other suggestion of the Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research. I would not be able to access these services as I was not a member of the Canadian Armed Forces. Are there any resources in Canada for people who have experienced non-military combat?
 
This does not seem correct, as Veterans Affairs Canada is limited to former members of the Canadian Armed Forces. I was never a member of the CAF, so I would not be entitled to VAC services. The same goes for your other suggestion of the Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research. I would not be able to access these services as I was not a member of the Canadian Armed Forces. Are there any resources in Canada for people who have experienced non-military combat?
I apologize for the misinformation earlier. You are correct that Veteran Affairs Canada and the Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research are specifically for members or former members of the Canadian Armed Forces.

There are resources available in Canada for people who have experienced non-military combat. Here are some options you can explore:

1. Canadian Mental Health Association: They offer a range of services that can include counseling, support groups, and other resources to address issues related to trauma, PTSD, and other mental health challenges.

2. Trauma and Mental Health Resource Guide: This guide, put together by the Ontario Psychological Association, offers information on trauma-related mental health issues and resources available across Ontario.

3. Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture: They offer services to people who have experienced torture, trauma, and other forms of violence, including counseling, legal support, and employment assistance.

4. The National Counseling Association in Canada: It offers a comprehensive resource list of private therapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists who specialize in trauma and mental health, searchable by region and specific treatment approach.

5. Your Family Doctor or General Practitioners: They can provide mental health resources and support, including therapy, medication or referral to appropriate services.

There can be long waitlists to access publicly funded mental health resources, so it may be worthwhile to also look into private therapy as an option. In either case, it’s important to ensure that the practitioner has expertise in treating trauma-related concerns.
 
You have insufficient privileges to reply here.
Back
Top