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Does your therapist use the PSS-I or PSS-I-5? (PTSD Symptom Scale Interview)

Thread starter #1
The center where I have been going to for a few years has changed Directors within the Mental Health Dept. Currently my normal talk therapy which included working on various components within DBT (such as Radical Acceptance) has been tossed aside for an interview style proceeding any discussion known as PTSD Symptom Scale Interview (PSS-I and PSS-I-5). 🤔 Is anyone else being blessed (coughs) with this of late?

It has several questions for quantitative measuring which takes (per authorities of the test) 20 minutes if one can focus lol. However, since my disassociation is rather high at this time, most of the 40 minutes of my Therapy Session are absorbed within my grappling for recall then refocusIng in order to address. The scale on the questions as well as the questions theirselves (which in my current mood swing) appear to be a form of agitation rather than self assessment.

After three sessions being hogged by this bloody construct, it became apparent to my T. that my scale was increasing. Dah. He offered to send me the test prior to the talk, so we might communicate the numbers then proceed. We shall see.

So I was wondering if you currently were undergoing this style of modality that is claimed by some to be helpful to the client. For me, knowing my PTSD is increasing during a Pandemic, ect isn’t necessarily a toolkit. However, you might have a different opinion and I am willing to learn as sometimes I can be a donkey’s butt before I accept...change. Thanks.
 

joeylittle

Administrator
#2
an interview style proceeding any discussion known as PTSD Symptom Scale Interview (PSS-I and PSS-I-5). 🤔 Is anyone else being blessed (coughs) with this of late?
This isn't really to do with treatment. It's just an evaluative measure - a quantifiable way for the therapist or doctor to track overall change in the client/patient.

It may be a new reporting requirement for your insurance; or, if your therapist works in a group, it may be a new policy for the group....OR, they may have decided they want the info from the ongoing assessment.

It's also how a clinician would properly determine whether your PTSD is active or dormant. When therapy is effectively addressing PTSD, the individual will eventually no longer meet PTSD criteria. They may still meet criteria for anxiety or depression or any other associated set of symptoms or course - it's not some sort of score sheet where you suddenly become problem-free - but it can help determine what therapeutic interventions to focus on.

You should really only need to do it once a month, or less.

You can read more about it here: info on PSS-I-5
 
Thread starter #3
You should really only need to do it once a month, or less.

I am grateful for your input as I did not consider the quantitative system advantages in highlighting the various components or symptoms. I will address it with my T however, as to the reason why each session is now involving this tool as I am going every two weeks as I have been escalating.

Thank you for your assistance on placement as well as thread title.
 
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