Feeling hopeless about my depression

3. Embracing new opportunities: Sometimes, people find that going through a loss gives them a new perspective on life or inspires them to try something they may not have considered before. This could mean taking up a new hobby or traveling to a new place that was meaningful to the person who passed away.
Can you elaborate on how a loss can give you a new perspective on life?
 
Can you elaborate on how a loss can give you a new perspective on life?
Experiencing a significant loss can often challenge a person's existing beliefs, values, and perspectives. In some cases, the loss can lead to a fundamental change in how a person views themselves, others, and the world around them. Here are a few ways in which a loss can give a person a new perspective on life:

1. Increased appreciation for life: A significant loss can bring into sharp focus how precious and fleeting life can be. This realization may lead a person to cherish the time they have more earnestly and seek out experiences that bring them joy and fulfillment.

2. Greater empathy and compassion: Losing someone close can help a person understand the depth of human suffering and foster greater empathy and compassion for others. This realization may inspire a person to volunteer or give back to their community in meaningful ways.

3. Re-evaluation of priorities: A loss can also cause a person to reassess what is most important in their life. This may mean re-prioritizing relationships, career goals, or other aspects of their life that were previously taken for granted.

4. Mindfulness and presence: Losing someone can make a person more aware of the present moment and help them value the time that they have more fully. This may lead to greater mindfulness and a desire to live life in a more focused and intentional way.

5. Reflection and personal growth: Grief can be a time of deep reflection and introspection, allowing a person to confront parts of themselves that they may have ignored or neglected previously. This self-exploration can lead to personal growth and a newfound sense of purpose and direction.

While it's important to acknowledge that grief is a complex and challenging process, it's also essential to recognize that many people emerge from their grief with a new perspective on life that inspires personal growth and positive change.
 
Thank you, that is very, very helpful.

Can a persistent loss of sense of identity and purpose after a loss be a sign of "prolonged grief" ?
 
Thank you, that is very, very helpful.

Can a persistent loss of sense of identity and purpose after a loss be a sign of "prolonged grief" ?
Yes, a persistent loss of sense of identity and purpose after a loss can be a sign of prolonged grief or complicated grief. Complicated grief is characterized by persistent and intense mourning that impedes a person's ability to recover from their loss. Symptoms may include persistent feelings of emptiness, a sense of meaninglessness or loss of purpose, difficulty imagining a future without the person who has passed away, feeling stuck or unable to move forward, and difficulty performing tasks or managing responsibilities.

It's important to note that experiencing complicated grief does not necessarily mean that a person is at risk of developing more severe mental health problems, but it can significantly impact their quality of life and day-to-day functioning. If you are experiencing symptoms of complicated grief, it may be helpful to seek the support of a mental health professional who specializes in grief and loss.

While everyone experiences grief differently, and there is no set timeline for the grieving process, prolonged or complicated grief can be a significant challenge to work through. Seeking support can be an essential step towards finding a way forward and beginning to rebuild a sense of purpose and identity.
 
Can you explain PTED (Post traumatic embitterment disorder) to me?
Post-traumatic embitterment disorder (PTED) is a type of reactive disorder that arises in response to a significant and unfair event that is perceived as having been caused by a specific person or group of people. The term "embitterment" refers to a deep-rooted sense of anger, disappointment, and bitterness associated with the event and the perceived injustice.

PTED is not included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), but it has been discussed among mental health professionals as a potential diagnosis. According to research, PTED may be associated with symptoms such as persistent anger or hostility, feelings of betrayal or injustice, and difficulty moving on from the event.

PTED is different from PTSD, in that it is not associated with a traumatic event in the traditional sense, like a physical assault or near-death experience. Instead, it occurs in response to ongoing feelings of injustice, unfairness, and betrayal, such as a prolonged and unfair workplace situation, or a painful and high-conflict divorce.

It's worth noting that not everyone who experiences a significant and unfair event will develop PTED. Its development is influenced by factors such as personality traits, coping mechanisms, social support, and the severity of the event.

If you are experiencing symptoms of PTED or feel overwhelmed by feelings of bitterness and resentment, it may be helpful to seek the support of a mental health professional. They can offer a safe and supportive space to work through your emotions and help you develop coping strategies to manage your symptoms.
 
I have PTSD (or C-PTSD) from childhood trauma combined with an episode of major depression.

Why is it that these conditions make normal experiences like having a bad cold/ having a slipped disc/ having a broken toe so much more difficult to deal with mentally?
 
I have PTSD (or C-PTSD) from childhood trauma combined with an episode of major depression.

Why is it that these conditions make normal experiences like having a bad cold/ having a slipped disc/ having a broken toe so much more difficult to deal with mentally?
Experiencing PTSD or C-PTSD due to childhood trauma can result in heightened emotional reactivity and increased arousal to perceived threats. This can cause a more extreme response to stress, including physical illnesses or injuries, making them seem more challenging to deal with mentally.

The experience of childhood trauma can result in changes to the brain's stress response system, specifically the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which regulates the body's response to stress. When this system is repeatedly activated due to prolonged or repeated exposure to trauma, it can become dysregulated, leading to hypersensitivity to stress in the future.

Additionally, PTSD and C-PTSD can contribute to negative beliefs about oneself, others, and the world, which can impact how an individual perceives and responds to everyday experiences, including physical illnesses or injuries. For example, someone with PTSD or C-PTSD may have beliefs such as "I am weak" or "I can't handle anything," which can amplify the distress associated with physical symptoms.

Major depression can also contribute to physical symptoms, including fatigue, pain, and a general sense of malaise. These physical symptoms can further contribute to feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, which can exacerbate symptoms of PTSD or C-PTSD.

It is essential to remember that PTSD, C-PTSD, and major depression can all impact how an individual perceives and responds to everyday experiences, making them seem more challenging to deal with mentally. Seeking support from a mental health professional who is trained in trauma and depression can help individuals develop coping strategies to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.
 
It seems that some of my PTSD symptoms are cancelled out by my depression symptoms. For example, when I only had PTSD, I would get awful panic attacks. Now that I have major depression, it's like my body no longer has enough energy for a panic attack. This superficially sounds positive, but my doctors and I are worried. It's like the depression is so bad it's cancelled my normal survival instinct/ fear of death.
 
It seems that some of my PTSD symptoms are cancelled out by my depression symptoms. For example, when I only had PTSD, I would get awful panic attacks. Now that I have major depression, it's like my body no longer has enough energy for a panic attack. This superficially sounds positive, but my doctors and I are worried. It's like the depression is so bad it's cancelled my normal survival instinct/ fear of death.
It is not uncommon for there to be overlap or co-occurring symptoms between PTSD and depression, and it is possible for depression symptoms to have a dampening effect on the intensity of anxiety-related PTSD symptoms, such as panic attacks.

However, if you are experiencing a lack of fear or survival instinct, this could be a concerning symptom and may warrant further exploration with your healthcare provider. A lack of fear or survival instinct can be indicative of a dissociative symptom, which is a common response to trauma. Dissociation can involve feeling disconnected from oneself, one's surroundings, or one's emotions, and can be a form of emotional numbing.

It is essential to address any concerning symptoms with a healthcare provider who can help assess and provide appropriate treatment options. This may involve exploring the possibility of dissociative symptoms and addressing both PTSD and depression symptoms concurrently. A mental health professional may also recommend different treatment options, such as medication, therapy, or a combination of both, to help you manage your symptoms effectively.
 
Can you tell me more about this?
The lack of fear or a survival instinct can manifest in different ways for different individuals. In some cases, it may involve feeling emotionally numb or disconnected from oneself, to the point where an individual feels detached from their own experiences or surroundings. This can also include feeling a lack of response to situations that would typically elicit fear or panic.

In the context of PTSD, this lack of fear or survival instinct may occur as a dissociative symptom, which can arise as a coping mechanism in response to trauma. Dissociation involves a disruption in the normal integration of thoughts, emotions, and perceptions, leading to feelings of detachment or disconnection from oneself or one's surroundings. In some cases, this can lead to a lack of emotional reactivity, making it more challenging to experience intense emotions such as fear or panic.

It's important to note that a lack of fear or survival instinct is not a healthy response, and it can be indicative of a more significant problem. If you are experiencing this symptom, it's crucial to speak with a healthcare provider who can help you assess your symptoms, provide an accurate diagnosis, and suggest appropriate treatment options.

Treatment options for dissociative symptoms may include therapy, medication, or a combination of both. Therapy may involve cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), among other approaches. Medications may include antidepressants, antipsychotics, or mood stabilizers, depending on the severity of the symptoms and the individual's unique needs.
 
You have insufficient privileges to reply here.
Back
Top