Finding Therapy Pointless Again

LeiaFlower

Confident
I'm finding myself dreading therapy sessions again. They're starting to feel like additional shifts amidst work, chores, and other obligations, rather than meaningful experiences. It's disheartening to discuss topics I could easily confide in my sister about, only to realize I'm paying for the same conversation. My therapist often suggests things I've already tried or researched extensively during my multiple inpatient/outpatient stays. When I express my concerns, their response typically boils down to, "Something must be bringing you back." But I already know what’s bringing me back—it's the financial investment. I've dedicated time, effort, and money to therapy already, and stopping now would make it all feel like a waste. However, it's becoming increasingly challenging to see the point in continuing. I have already tried reaching out to my therapist, doing more work individually, and changing expectations. I feel like how I use to feel with religion. Everyone else is having these miraculous experiences of growth yet I am alone, struggling to fake it.
 
I'm finding myself dreading therapy sessions again. They're starting to feel like additional shifts amidst work, chores, and other obligations, rather than meaningful experiences. It's disheartening to discuss topics I could easily confide in my sister about, only to realize I'm paying for the same conversation. My therapist often suggests things I've already tried or researched extensively during my multiple inpatient/outpatient stays. When I express my concerns, their response typically boils down to, "Something must be bringing you back." But I already know what’s bringing me back—it's the financial investment. I've dedicated time, effort, and money to therapy already, and stopping now would make it all feel like a waste. However, it's becoming increasingly challenging to see the point in continuing. I have already tried reaching out to my therapist, doing more work individually, and changing expectations. I feel like how I use to feel with religion. Everyone else is having these miraculous experiences of growth yet I am alone, struggling to fake it.
@LeiaFlower, I can understand that it can be disheartening and frustrating when therapy sessions start to feel like additional obligations rather than meaningful experiences. It sounds like you've put in a lot of effort and invested time, money, and energy into therapy, and it's disappointing when it doesn't seem to be yielding the results you had hoped for.

It's important to remember that therapy is a process, and progress can sometimes be gradual. However, if you feel like you have tried reaching out to your therapist, doing individual work, and adjusting your expectations without seeing significant improvement, it may be worth considering some alternative options.

Have you discussed your concerns about therapy feeling repetitive and the suggestions feeling like things you've already tried with your therapist? It can be helpful to have an open and honest conversation about your feelings and ask for clarification on why certain approaches are being suggested.

Additionally, have you considered seeking a second opinion or exploring other therapeutic modalities? Sometimes a fresh perspective or a different therapeutic approach can make a difference. It may be helpful to discuss these options with your current therapist or consider seeking out a new therapist who specializes in trauma and uses a different treatment approach.

Remember, it's important to find a therapist who understands your unique needs and can provide effective support. It may also be helpful to explore other resources outside of therapy, such as support groups or self-help books, to supplement your therapeutic journey.

Lastly, when it comes to comparing your progress to that of others, it's important to remember that everyone's healing journey is unique. It's not uncommon to feel alone or as though you're struggling while others seem to be making significant progress. Each person's healing process is different and it's important to focus on your own growth at your own pace.

Please let me know if there's anything else I can do to support you through this.
 
I've explored various therapeutic methods and worked with therapists from diverse backgrounds and qualifications, including EMDR, CBT, IFS, Somatic Therapy, Sex Therapy, Trauma Focused Therapy, DBT, and a bit of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Despite nearly five years of attempting therapy, my sentiments remain unchanged—I often feel like I'm exchanging payment for something readily available elsewhere. While I acknowledge that I have extensive trauma to address, it doesn't have a significant impact on my life. I'm left pondering: How much longer must I continue this trial-and-error process? What additional external effort must I invest that hasn't been already? And when is it acceptable to be given grace to give up?
 
I've explored various therapeutic methods and worked with therapists from diverse backgrounds and qualifications, including EMDR, CBT, IFS, Somatic Therapy, Sex Therapy, Trauma Focused Therapy, DBT, and a bit of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Despite nearly five years of attempting therapy, my sentiments remain unchanged—I often feel like I'm exchanging payment for something readily available elsewhere. While I acknowledge that I have extensive trauma to address, it doesn't have a significant impact on my life. I'm left pondering: How much longer must I continue this trial-and-error process? What additional external effort must I invest that hasn't been already? And when is it acceptable to be given grace to give up?
@LeiaFlower, I understand that you've explored a variety of therapeutic methods and worked with therapists from different backgrounds and qualifications, which shows your commitment to addressing your trauma. It can be frustrating when you've put in significant effort and tried multiple approaches without experiencing the desired results.

In situations like yours, where you've dedicated a substantial amount of time and energy to therapy without feeling significant impact, it can be helpful to take a step back and evaluate your options. It's important to remember that therapy is a collaborative process, and it's crucial for you to have a sense of agency and ownership in your healing journey.

Given that you have already explored various therapeutic methods and approaches, it may be worth considering a few different avenues:

1. Reassess your current therapist: It might be beneficial to have a frank conversation with your current therapist regarding your concerns and frustrations. Discussing your feelings can facilitate a productive dialogue between you and your therapist, allowing for adjustments in the treatment plan or exploring alternative approaches that may be a better fit for you.

2. Seek a second opinion: Consulting with another mental health professional can provide you with fresh insights and alternative perspectives. They can conduct an assessment and offer recommendations based on their clinical expertise and experience.

3. Explore additional modalities: Alongside therapy, there are various adjunctive healing modalities that you may find beneficial. These can include mindfulness practices, acupuncture, yoga, meditation, art therapy, or other forms of alternative therapies. While these approaches may not replace therapy, they can complement your healing journey and provide additional support.

4. Self-guided exploration: Continue your commitment to personal growth and healing by engaging in self-guided work. This can involve reading books on trauma or finding online courses or resources that align with your interests and needs. Self-guided exploration can empower you to take control of your healing process.

It's important to remember that there is no set timeline for healing, and everyone's journey is different. While it can be disheartening to feel like you've exhausted therapy without significant progress, it's crucial to offer yourself compassion and give yourself permission to explore alternative options. Ultimately, the decision to continue or take a break from therapy is a personal one, and it's important to prioritize your well-being.

Please know that I'm here to provide support and guidance as you navigate this process.
 
But I have already done these things. I do check ins with my current therapist every so often. I have a second therapist and I feel the same way about not wanting to be in therapy anymore. I do expressive arts of various forms and every other day I do self-guided explorations. I am just tired of wasting my time with this, I just want to end things.
 
But I have already done these things. I do check ins with my current therapist every so often. I have a second therapist and I feel the same way about not wanting to be in therapy anymore. I do expressive arts of various forms and every other day I do self-guided explorations. I am just tired of wasting my time with this, I just want to end things.
@LeiaFlower, I'm really sorry to hear that you're feeling this way, but I can't provide the help that you need. It's important to reach out to a mental health professional or a trusted person in your life who can offer support.
 
right, okay, thanks anyways
I'm sorry if I couldn't be of more help. Remember, reaching out to a mental health professional or a trusted person in your life can make a significant difference. Take care and don't hesitate to reach out again if you need further support.
 
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