Hearing weird things when you wake up

Lilac98

Policy Enforcement
I woke up at some unknown time this morning or in the night, I'm not sure. I heard someone sounding upset say stop just stop. I was like what's going on? Who said that? I realised it wasn't my sister who was at work on a night shift, it wasn't dad and it didn't sound like mum. It sounded like me but I didn't say anything. It was really weird I was awake but I guess not fully. I also when I was more awake later realised what I heard was what I heard myself say before in a flashback I had in November. Have you heard anything weird when you wake up?
 

Givrali

MyPTSD Pro
It takes me several minutes to acknowledge sound around me. Exemple I never hear my alarm when it wakes me because I stop it before being fully awake
 

Lilac98

Policy Enforcement
It takes me several minutes to acknowledge sound around me. Exemple I never hear my alarm when it wakes me because I stop it before being fully awake
Have you ever heard something from a flashback when you wake up?
 

Lilac98

Policy Enforcement
Why do you think you heard it?
I don't know normally I only hear things when I'm falling asleep and it's just a noise not anyone speaking. I know you can hear stuff when you're waking up so I know it's normal but hearing that particular thing was weird. It sounded like someone had actually said it I thought something was happening to someone. I feel like I'm stupid and I was supposed to know the answer to that question.
 
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Lilac98

Policy Enforcement
Could have been a psychotic episode. Hearing stuff that isn't really there...
I thought psychotic episodes have to happen for a certain amount of time, not just one incident. Though they can be quite short I think. I researched psychosis before cause I was just curious. I've not had psychosis before.
 

Sideways

Moderator
The point was more that it could be a whole lot of different things. It could also just be the ordinary mental grogginess of waking up. Occam's Razor.

I think probably the bigger question is how does a person with your serious mental health condition (which is not ptsd) manage the apparent distress of what are seemingly very ordinary everyday issues. I suspect that's a common issue for people suffering with your condition. And like I've said before, you're unlikely to find answers to that here.

The drawback of looking for answers in the wrong places? Is you're going to get confusing, unhelpful, and very unlikely responses. Like "it could have been a hallucination".
 

Lilac98

Policy Enforcement
The point was more that it could be a whole lot of different things. It could also just be the ordinary mental grogginess of waking up. Occam's Razor.

I think probably the bigger question is how does a person with your serious mental health condition (which is not ptsd) manage the apparent distress of what are seemingly very ordinary everyday issues. I suspect that's a common issue for people suffering with your condition. And like I've said before, you're unlikely to find answers to that here.

The drawback of looking for answers in the wrong places? Is you're going to get confusing, unhelpful, and very unlikely responses. Like "it could have been a hallucination".
It was similar to what I heard myself say in a flashback and I was confused about it and since people have trauma on this forum, I thought it would be fine to ask it here. I haven't ever been assessed for ptsd. No diagnosis doesn't mean you don't have something. Maybe I do maybe I don't. But I thought you could be on this site if you've had some sort of trauma even if you had no diagnosis.
 

Sideways

Moderator
I thought you could be on this site if you've had some sort of trauma even if you had no diagnosis.
Yes.
It was similar to what I heard myself say in a flashback and I was confused about it
Yes, I hear you. I genuinely do.

This is very closely related to an issue that you've been ruminating on, though. And I think therein lies the most likely explanation. The more you think about it, the more you think about it.

And what concerns me with that, is that while asking about it here is allowed, the responses you will get are through the lens of living with ptsd.

Whether or not you've been diagnosed with ptsd is a seperate issue. The fact remains that you are living with a serious mental health issue, which is not ptsd, and which is clearly your primary mental health issue. Hence the support worker that you have.

You have mental health professionals involved in your care, but none of them have diagnosed you with ptsd. When a mental health professional sees a trauma issue playing out, and causing distress and loss of function for a patient? They are very likely to turn their mind to the question of whether the person has trauma-induced condition, irrespective of whether the patient has asked to be assessed. That's part of their job.

Your primary mental health condition is the first lens that I think a lot of your questions should be considered through. Your primary condition is not ptsd.

If you spend enough time ruminating on this issue, and analysing everything through the lens of ptsd, I think you will miss the kind of insightful and helpful responses you would get if you asked a more relevant audience. I think the answers to questions just like the one in this post can be answered very meaningfully through that lens.
 
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