How much does the maintenance of a house cost?

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littleoc

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I am attempting to move out of my mom's house so I can actually live somewhere clean and comfortable where I won't be triggered every five seconds. (That's an exaggeration, no worries.)

I was looking online and found some apartments that are cheap, but don't have good storage space and whatnot. Then I noticed that foreclosed homes around here and other cheaper homes would have basically the same monthly payments for a mortgage as I would be paying for rent.

This obviously isn't including utilities or how much bigger the down-payment would be for a house than for a small apartment.

I told this to my mother and she warned me, "Careful! You have to be able to afford the maintenance of the house as well. Your twin brother is renting an apartment because he isn't financially stable enough yet to afford maintenance and the apartments pay that for him."

I thought about it, came back, and asked her what the maintenance for this house is. I got a lecture about how she doesn't pay maintenance because this house was ripped out from under her by my dad and she doesn't pay for anything.

Kind of ironic because as far as I can tell, this house requires a SHITTON of maintenance right now. Do y'all know the maintenance costs of a rental house, by the way?

Anyway, I'm looking for adult advice that isn't just me being told how much my dad sucks. I'm aware already that my dad sucks. That doesn't really help me move out.

If you want to add that he sucks, though, I guess I won't stop you. :p

Does this article seems pretty accurate? How Much Does It Cost to Maintain A House?

Thank you for any help!
 
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FauxLiz

Sponsor
House maintenance varies based upon the age, condition, size, and for existing not new construction how much maintenance has been done in the past.

Maintenance should also include in my opinion taxes, insurance, HOA fees if there are any, yard maintenance, snow removal (even if that is just the costs of a mower, snowblower depending where you live), setting money aside for appliance and HVAC repair or replacement etc.

When you rent the cost of these things are generally figured in unless the lease makes them the renters responsibility. However the cost of you taxes and the interest on the mortgage can be deductible on your taxes in the US.
 

hithere

MyPTSD Pro
are in the US? You may qualify for a zero down loan as there are grants out there for lower income people with a stable income. If you are in the states the first thing to do is contact a loan officer. Most likely you will not be able to buy a foreclosed home because they will have needed repairs even very very small repairs that you can do. The problem is your mortgage company will require that any small repair must be completed prior to closing, and the bank's won't do it, and they won't allow you to do it prior to. So anything in that house that an appraiser will note or take a photograph of that is "Less Than Average Condition" will not pass for a loan. But don't be discouraged because a good EXPERIENCED buyer agent can help you find something in your price range that will work.

Maintenance is just something that comes up and sometimes I have gone 10 years without a single maintenance issue in my home. When I needed a new roof my insurance company paid for it. Sometimes roof leafs may cost a few hundred bucks to repair, a sump pump will cost a few hundred to repair, a water heater $2,000, When you buy a house, have the Seller pay for a "warranty" that will cover these break downs in mechanical things and plumbing.

You Tube and Google are great sources for how to do your own repairs.
 

frogthroat

Not Active
When you rent a house all the maintenance comes from the landlord just like an apartment. That being said you have to think of things including homeowner's insurance and you need to get the house appraised before you buy it. That way you're aware of issues that already exist within the house. Things like water heaters, roofing, and sewer are all things you would have to pay for.
Also, not to be a Debbie downer because I don't know what state you're in but if you've never rented or been on your own before you're going to have a hard time getting a loan or they're going to give you a insane interest rate. Which will make your mortgage hard to pay off.
How much room do you think you need? I have a two bedroom apartment and it's good for me and you could fit your birds and your dog comfortably in your living space. Are you worried about not being able to keep your pets?
 

RandyMac

Learning
My little house was built in 1952, largely of Redwood, the basic structure is sound. It was totally redone in 2008, top to bottom.
When we moved in Sept 2012, it looked new. The mortgage is over $200 less than rent on a comparable place, insurance, taxes included. Actual maintenance on the building is practically nothing so far, I do see a change of color coming up. Call it the operating system, anything to do with water, temp control, power distribution and utilization, whatever else is the time and money sucker.
You do need to set and keep regular inspections and do what is needed or you will be paying someone else to fix shit.
 

MyWillow

MyPTSD Pro
The trick is to gradually save up a cash buffer so it’s not something you have to stress about all at once. Even if it’s a small amount per week that you put aside. We are always spending money on maintenance and are slowly renovating as we can afford it. Maintenance would cost us a LOT more if we didn’t have such a handy and helpful neighbour. He and my OH (who is NOT practical) are currently fixing the leaking pipe on the water tank. I would have had to call a plumber ($$$$$$$). Washing machine died on the weekend after 10 years faithful service. There’s another $700 with zero notice.
 

littleoc

Sponsor
Thank you all so much for taking the time to answer. That was incredibly helpful. :)

Maintenance of a rental house or a house you buy? You sort of ask both so it’s unclear.
Either one, because I'm not totally sure what my next step should be. But, I left it sort of open so that people could just add whatever they're already experienced with. :)

But, mainly owning a house.

Also, not to be a Debbie downer because I don't know what state you're in but if you've never rented or been on your own before you're going to have a hard time getting a loan or they're going to give you a insane interest rate.
That's not Debbie downer, no worries. That's good to know!

How much room do you think you need? I have a two bedroom apartment and it's good for me and you could fit your birds and your dog comfortably in your living space. Are you worried about not being able to keep your pets?
I'm used to not having much room -- between my mom's hoarded up house and living in various dorm rooms or couches the last few years. I rented one house for caring for Nestle (service dog) after she had a major surgery, and it was good enough. Low on storage space, though.

And yeah, my sister needs me to take her two cats (one of them is pretty traumatized and wouldn't do well if put up for adoption), and I have a bird and a snake already. Technically the snake can live without me -- plus he's a lil corn so he could adapt to anything anyway. But the bird I do need with me, for her health (I've tried trusting other people to care for her, she got major health issues all three times that have now caused permanent damage), and the two cats. But thankfully the service dog doesn't count as a pet.

I'm also worried about our barn cat, Xavier. My mom and I got him because new neighbors caused a local extinction event of rattlesnakes, and the king and racer snakes are too sparse also, so the mice population went INSANE. He was my sister's cat also (she's not getting any more cats) but he was peeing everywhere. So we employed him as the Mouse Cat. Some owls have finally moved in though, and now the mouse population is back to being reasonable.

But anyway, my mom only feeds Xavier. When it's really cold, or too hot, I'm the one judging weather or not he should come in, and I'm the one feeding him real food and giving him bonding time. (He loves people. He can say "hello" (freaks the neighbors out) and he will yell that word until someone comes out to see him.) I'm worried that if I get an apartment and he stays here, he'll end up hurt somehow.

I need to come back to my mom's house a lot anyway because she can't take care of her own cat.

But anyway, thank you!

And also @Friday I think you deleted your post? But I wanted to let you know that it was helpful also and I live in the southeastern United States! So less snow, thankfully.





Thank you all, again, for all the information!! It's looking like for my first place I should consider renting an apartment or a house, but just renting.

In an attempt to not live with my mom, I have moved in and out a total of 18 times since 2013. I really want to find a permanent place where I won't have to move for several years at least. I really hate moving. (Does anyone like it?)
 

hithere

MyPTSD Pro
Thank you all so much for taking the time to answer. That was incredibly helpful. :)


Either one, because I'm not totally sure what my next step should be. But, I left it sort of open so that people could just add whatever they're already experienced with. :)

But, mainly owning a house.


That's not Debbie downer, no worries. That's good to know!


I'm used to not having much room -- between my mom's hoarded up house and living in various dorm rooms or couches the last few years. I rented one house for caring for Nestle (service dog) after she had a major surgery, and it was good enough. Low on storage space, though.

And yeah, my sister needs me to take her two cats (one of them is pretty traumatized and wouldn't do well if put up for adoption), and I have a bird and a snake already. Technically the snake can live without me -- plus he's a lil corn so he could adapt to anything anyway. But the bird I do need with me, for her health (I've tried trusting other people to care for her, she got major health issues all three times that have now caused permanent damage), and the two cats. But thankfully the service dog doesn't count as a pet.

I'm also worried about our barn cat, Xavier. My mom and I got him because new neighbors caused a local extinction event of rattlesnakes, and the king and racer snakes are too sparse also, so the mice population went INSANE. He was my sister's cat also (she's not getting any more cats) but he was peeing everywhere. So we employed him as the Mouse Cat. Some owls have finally moved in though, and now the mouse population is back to being reasonable.

But anyway, my mom only feeds Xavier. When it's really cold, or too hot, I'm the one judging weather or not he should come in, and I'm the one feeding him real food and giving him bonding time. (He loves people. He can say "hello" (freaks the neighbors out) and he will yell that word until someone comes out to see him.) I'm worried that if I get an apartment and he stays here, he'll end up hurt somehow.

I need to come back to my mom's house a lot anyway because she can't take care of her own cat.

But anyway, thank you!

And also @Friday I think you deleted your post? But I wanted to let you know that it was helpful also and I live in the southeastern United States! So less snow, thankfully.





Thank you all, again, for all the information!! It's looking like for my first place I should consider renting an apartment or a house, but just renting.

In an attempt to not live with my mom, I have moved in and out a total of 18 times since 2013. I really want to find a permanent place where I won't have to move for several years at least. I really hate moving. (Does anyone like it?)
You should do what's right for you, but I honestly think buying real estate is always a smart move, as long as you keep you total debt to income ratio below 30%. The US government allows 40% with VA & HUD loans, but keep it closer to 30 and it's a smart move. I hate renting.
 

FauxLiz

Sponsor
I would put a caveat to @hithere suggestion that you consider buying. With buying you gain equity yes but only if you live there long term. Housing values in most communities are pretty stable (some states control potential increase in taxable value) but if you don't think that you will live there long enough to pay down at least half your mortgage it may be smarter to rent and put more money aside for a down payment. I have learned that no only do I hate moving but have unfortunately had it become necessary for employment reasons (downsizing, corporate relocation, better job, etc) the cost of paying a realtor and closing costs can quickly eat into your equity if you don't have a significant amount when you sell.
 

littleoc

Sponsor
Very good to know, thank you two!

I am thinking I won't move for a long time, but I'm young enough that I should probably triple check. My goal is to not have to move for several years at least. I love stability. :)
 
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