How to slow down an anxious, adrenaline junkie?

I think the more someone tells one to do something and especially a hard habit to break, the worse it gets?

Redirecting energy is the key imo. I was the same as you've described and also needed to slow down.

Sports - high cardio sport is my go to. I've been engaging in sport to slow down my brain and body for years. For me it works. Not yoga lol.
 

RussellSue

MyPTSD Pro
Sports - high cardio sport is my go to.
This sort of thing makes sense to me, too. I use physical activity to slow down my brain. I never have done sports but serious hiking and plenty of exercise including cardio. Unfortunately, I ripped the cartilage around both of my hips last year. I have recovered a ton but still have a compressed nerve and tendinitis and so, I have been told that I need to physically slow down and pay attention to my pain and what is causing it which is the opposite of my typical power through the pain motto. I have no idea how to make this happen.
 

Movingforward10

MyPTSD Pro
I was going to suggest swimming too.

Also, what about aqua running?
I do this when I'm injured and can't run on land.
All you need is a foam belt (minimal cost) and a pool with a deep end, and you just ',run' in water. You don't go anywhere. But it is really really good for fitness. Loads of videos about it online. And top athletes use it as part of their training. You can do all sorts of high intensity running (sprinting, long running, mix it up), with absolutely no impact on the body (as your feet don't touch the ground). I find it helps keep my mind alert and active as you have to really concentrate on your movements. And it releases energy in the same way as running on land does. And it aids rehabilitation.
 

Friday

Moderator
Any suggestions on how exactly an anxious, overactive, adrenaline addict like myself ought to try doing that?
FINE MOTOR!!! šŸ„·Challenging, bound&determined, exacting, thrill of AHA!!! I got you! Dexterity improving, imagination grabbing, whoa.... is that the time? Kinds of fine motor. (Including things that are a combo of fine and gross motor, but where the focus/intent/energy is refined down to the precise).

Picking locks. Calligraphy. A million various kinds of visual art. Piano, guitar, violin, flute, woodwinds (heck maybe 95% of musical instruments out there). A thousand other things.
 

RussellSue

MyPTSD Pro
Change your sport? I have a serious inflammatory tendon condition that doesn't stand up well to weight bearing. Swimming is the next best option for me. Helps me slow down, tire out & process mental stuff.

I went to the pool consistently for a few months right after I injured myself and it did help. There's been a glitch in all of that since we moved multiple times in the last few months. We are at least semi-permanently settled now (and have been for all of about 3 weeks) but the closest pool is 45 minutes away. I go to the city twice a week for PT and I may be able to get there one more day per week to get to the pool for a total of 3 pool sessions a week. This is less than I'd like but probably better than nothing. I haven't made that commitment, yet, but it seems like I need to.

Thanks for the suggestion and reminder. It is a very good idea.
 

RussellSue

MyPTSD Pro
you have to really concentrate on your movements.
Then it sounds like a great idea. That's the main thing my PT keeps telling me: that I need to pay close attention to my form. Between hypermobility, bad balance and just moving too damned fast in general, I fail to realize precisely what joints are doing and the next thing I know I have a new injury. And because I have done this all my life, trying to stop it in a fast-paced sport-type environment would probably tear every ligament in my body. I can bike but I stay far away from anything where impact is going to be a thing.

I have actually never been able to run more than a short distance on land, presumably because of a throat issue caused by a surgery. I can't breathe. I was told that impact was aggravating this thing in my throat, so it might be really cool to see if I could do aqua running.
 

Rani G

MyPTSD Pro
exactly an anxious, overactive, adrenaline addict like myself ought to try doing that?
Hello @RussellSue
Probably not a useful tip because one needs to firstly find the right one and and then buy it! ā€žThe nature Moor cusion XXLā€œ While going through a prolapsed Disc last year, this was helpful. Not the heated version when thereā€™s inflammation.

Your question was about >>>>> how to slow down>>>>>
So otherā€˜s suggestions would probably work better.
Please don't say yoga šŸ„ŗ

Yes Yoga šŸ˜. Ah well.. afted the MRI, xrays, orthopedist, injections ect.. only the osteopath could help me.
Hope you feel better soon !!!!!
 
This is less than I'd like but probably better than nothing.

^I'd say that starting with twice a week (whilst near a pool anyway) is ideal. Start slowly. I do laps but even if you don't starting any sport after a break really does mean begin gently and wait for your body to get up to speed.

Once you've comfortably achieved decent times/distances then maybe think about adding another visit into your week. Beginning is the challenge lol.
 

RussellSue

MyPTSD Pro
Challenging, bound&determined, exacting, thrill of AHA!!! I got you! Dexterity improving, imagination grabbing, whoa.... is that the time? Kinds of fine motor.
Oh good. I was feeling like I had been told to slowly stop breathing. I know that sounds dramatic but for realz, slow down??? Listen to your body?? That sounds like a whole lotta hell to me.

I used to play a lot of instruments. I was even getting reasonably good with violin. I still have a native flute (but those aren't very challenging which is probably why I still have it). I always wanted to draw better. Maybe I'll sit my ass down and try to do something of this nature rather than crawling around under the trailer.

I kept feeling like slowing down meant thinking about my emotions and physical pain for hours on end. Thanks for giving me some hope.

Thanks for the suggestions.
 
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