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Medical Hysterectomy - What to expect?

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I’m scheduled to have a hysterectomy in a little over a month. My doctor wants a different/better surgeon to do the robotic surgery because he said that I have a difficult case. Scar tissue attaching my uterus to my abdominal wall or something like that. I’m a little panicked because I don’t know him (new surgeon). I do meet him in a week, so hopefully it will go okay.

Can anyone tell me what to expect from a “difficult” robotic hysterectomy. I want to get this done because my cycles have reversed where I seem to bleed all of the days with one week off. This has created anemia and I do take iron and tried the vitamin k-2, but didn’t like how bloated it made me feel.

What questions or plans should I bring to this upcoming appointment? They said he’ll want to examine me since he doesn’t know me. Is that weird or necessary?
 
They said he’ll want to examine me since he doesn’t know me.
I'm speaking as someone with a male body here, but I'll say that I've had two cases in our family where MRIs only told part of the story. Successful treatment came from the experience and observations of the doctors more than looking at the MRIs. Having the new doctor want to examine you is a good sign that the doctor wants to be engaged with you, the patient, and learn as much as they can to give you the best care. That doesn't negate the fears you have, though, which make perfect sense. It's okay to address those fears with the doctor ("I have PTSD"), if that helps to calm you.
 
I'm speaking as someone with a male body here, but I'll say that I've had two cases in our family where MRIs only told part of the story. Successful treatment came from the experience and observations of the doctors more than looking at the MRIs. Having the new doctor want to examine you is a good sign that the doctor wants to be engaged with you, the patient, and learn as much as they can to give you the best care. That doesn't negate the fears you have, though, which make perfect sense. It's okay to address those fears with the doctor ("I have PTSD"), if that helps to calm you.
I’ll probably dissociate. I just don’t think he would be able to see the things he needs to see considering the cervix would be closed. However, the appointment will be allotted more time, so maybe that is the goal. It’s weird with “elective” surgery. I’ve had 5 different doctors say this is the only way to solve the problem, but this is a major surgery that will involve financial loss and could create new problems. I hate how hard this is and it’s causing me to slip into “parts” and take supportive meds that I haven’t taken in a long time.
 
Hi... I had a hysterectomy where they only discovered during the surgery that my womb was attached/ fused to my bowels and to the abdominal wall... They managed to fix it all during the surgery tho and just gave me extra anti-biotics in case there had been any minimal damage to the bowel tissue.

I was quite scared (panicky) about the surgery cos I'm terrible at hospital stays... they trigger all heck out of me and I don't manage to get re-regulated at all.

So, going into hospital, I made sure to tell each Dr and each nurse there that I have PTSD and that I get really bad panic attacks in hospitals and that I may need sedatives to cope. It was difficult, to be that open about it but WOW it made such a difference.

Because it was a gyn ward, it turned out that they were quite trauma-aware. I guess they see a lot of women with sexual trauma, so they were very sensitive re PTSD, panic attacks, etc.

The staff were absolutely lovely... seriously, they were so sweet and caring that I didn't end up panicking at all during my whole stay.

Is it an option for you to tell the Dr's that you have PTSD/ panic attacks/ dissociation/ etc?

(I didn't have to tell them ANY of the details of my trauma btw, they just went with the PTSD diagnosis and provided all the support they could.)
 
I agree with @Ecdysis, let everyone know you have PTSD. I had a robotic assisted complete hysterectomy in Dec. 2020 for cancer. I had lots of scar tissue and the endometriosis had bound everything up with everything else. I was released the next day, and within a week I was gardening again. The worst part was just the tiredness after. I couldn't be examined in the office - complete hysteria at the thought, so the new surgeon did it after general anesthesia right before the surgery. I know I was dissociated during the month I discovered I had cancer and the surgery, because I completely forgot I had cancer. The wonders of PTSD.
 
So, going into hospital, I made sure to tell each Dr and each nurse there that I have PTSD and that I get really bad panic attacks in hospitals and that I may need sedatives to cope. It was difficult, to be that open about it but WOW it made such a difference.
I am amazed the difference in treatment I receive when I let them know about PTSD. Night and day. From run through the mill to kid gloves....
 
I met the surgeon and really liked him. My
Appointment was in his office. He was really funny and answered all of my questions. Ptsd is in my chart and I talked to both him and his nurse about my meds. I feel safe with him in regards to this surgery, I think. I guess next week’s ultrasound will be a nice little test since I’m assuming it’s internal. He said he does the surgery outpatient. He actually sends you home with a dial controlled pain and fluids pouch attached to you.

Thank you for your responses!
 
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