Is sleeping avoidance?

LuckiLee

MyPTSD Pro
Or a coping mechanism? Or a symptom? Depression?

I'm pretty sure I asked about this before. J can sleep an entire day away. It is usually a Saturday, after his 40 hour work week. It's almost 6:30 p.m. and he's been sleeping since last night. He woke up and ate a piece of pizza and use the restroom. He said he's "depressed and stressed out about x, y and z".

He would sleep the weekend away if I let him. I have plans with the family tomorrow and he says he is coming. I'll know if he's up for it in the morning. He has his "tells".

Just curious what ya'all think.
 

LuckiLee

MyPTSD Pro
Yeah. Depression is usually the common denominator when he does this. Plus he doesn't sleep all that great during the week.

He's awake now and ate dinner with me. Watching tv. I hope he doesn't stay up all night.

Thanks!
 

Sideways

Sponsor
For me it can be Avoidance of ptsd stuff.
Or it can be a major depressive episode.
They're quite distinct for me.
The former I tend to retreat to bed during the day, the latter I simply need craploads of sleep.

He's sawing logs again
This is an awesome coping strategy. The physical stuff resetting the chemical stuff. There's lots of perks and very few down sides to intense physical activity from a mental health perspective.

If he's sleeping from ptsd's Avoidance symptom cluster? Sawing wood is probably just as avoidant, but a healthier alternative to sleeping all day.

If he's sleeping from a MDE? The physical activity should help improve his mood. So, 2 different outcomes depending on what the underlying issue is.

My understanding of sleep deprivation is that sleep deprivation is sleep deprivation, and while it may feel like you're "catching up" on missed sleep by sleeping longer at the weekend, that's a bit of an old wives tale, and not actually how the brain works.

The amount of sleep he needs today may be quite different from what he's typically used to (it changes necessarily as we age), which means routine change (Argh!!). For a person living with chronic mental health issues, the gold standard is always going to be getting a healthy daily sleep routine going (which actually means getting up at the same time at the weekends - sleep scientists are total killjoys!), and getting enough sleep each and every night.

And I'm pretty sure none of that is news to you, but I'm trying to kick a MDE myself at the moment, with hypersomnolence issues, and the process of writing that all out was helpful to me...so, TY, and I hope he feels better.
 
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