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Manageable exposure therapy

MaplePancake

Learning
I have a lot of work place trauma. I want to be able to work again. I don’t know how to ease into that. I have hospital recruiters contacting me and that seems like positive development but I am afraid to test the waters. Even hearing from hospitals makes me feel jumpy and on edge. I want to know if there are any exposure therapy tips to help me reach a manageable level of work place anxiety.
 
I have a lot of work place trauma. I want to be able to work again. I don’t know how to ease into that. I have hospital recruiters contacting me and that seems like positive development but I am afraid to test the waters. Even hearing from hospitals makes me feel jumpy and on edge. I want to know if there are any exposure therapy tips to help me reach a manageable level of work place anxiety.
@MaplePancake, I'm sorry to hear that you have experienced workplace trauma. It can be challenging to overcome these experiences, but it's essential to begin taking steps towards healing.

Exposure therapy is a type of therapy that gradually exposes you to the situations or triggers that cause anxiety. This therapy is designed to help you become more comfortable and less reactive to those specific situations or triggers over time.

Before starting exposure therapy, is there a specific trigger or situation that causes you the most anxiety at the workplace? Perhaps there is a certain type of work or environment that makes you feel on edge?

One effective technique is called graded exposure, where you slowly or gradually expose yourself to the situation or trigger that causes anxiety. You may start with something less anxiety-provoking, such as reading job descriptions, making phone calls or emails to recruiters—something that you can manage without becoming too anxious. Eventually, you can work your way up to more anxiety-provoking situations, such as going to a job fair or attending an in-person interview.

It's important to make a list of situations that cause anxiety and then rank them from least to most anxiety-provoking. Then, start with the least anxiety-provoking situation, work towards becoming comfortable with it, and then move on to the next one.

Also, it's important to remember to practice relaxation techniques. Deep breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, and mindfulness meditation can be helpful in managing anxiety symptoms.

It's okay to take things at your own pace, and it's okay to set limits for what you feel comfortable with. It's essential to be patient with yourself during the healing process. Recovery is a journey, and there will be ups and downs.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have any additional questions or concerns.
 
Thank you. I am nervous about talking to recruiters. I do have a history of verbal abuse in the form of screaming, raging and people being extremely angry at me for minor issues. I just worry if I talk to a recruiter but don’t accept a job they will get mad. I feel like I have to please people to ensure my safety. I am trying to learn it is ok for me to assert myself but it is really hard and at my age you would think I would be able to do that
 
Thank you. I am nervous about talking to recruiters. I do have a history of verbal abuse in the form of screaming, raging and people being extremely angry at me for minor issues. I just worry if I talk to a recruiter but don’t accept a job they will get mad. I feel like I have to please people to ensure my safety. I am trying to learn it is ok for me to assert myself but it is really hard and at my age you would think I would be able to do that
@MaplePancake, it's understandable that you feel nervous about talking to recruiters, given your history of workplace verbal abuse. It's important to remember that assertiveness is a skill that can be learned and practiced, but it takes time and effort.

It's okay to prioritize your own safety and well-being over pleasing others. You have the right to assert yourself and set boundaries in any situation, including with recruiters. Remember that it's okay to say no if a job offer doesn't feel right for you.

Some techniques that may help you assert yourself include using "I" statements, being clear about your expectations and boundaries, and acknowledging the other person's perspective while still remaining firm in your own. For example, you could say something like, "I appreciate your interest in me, but I don't feel comfortable accepting a job offer at this time. Thank you for your consideration."

It may also be helpful to practice assertiveness skills in other situations, such as with friends and family or in everyday interactions. This can help build your confidence and make it easier to assert yourself in more challenging situations.

Remember, the healing process takes time, and it's okay to take things at your own pace. Don't hesitate to reach out for support if you need it.
 
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