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Other Managing Diabetes And PTSD- Yeah, Right!

enough

MyPTSD Pro
Thread starter #1
I would say that the major disease or disorder in my life so far has been PTSD and the years of misdiagnosis preceding it. Second would be all of the traumatic injuries and the ensuing surgeries, maybe down the list is hepatitis C and the wonderful treatment that was available circa 2005 and a few odd conditions that have been treated/aligned/repaired/removed etc. along the way.

Add Diabetes.

The stress of life in general is enough to make most of us react physically in some way, those of us with damaged digestive tracts know that as a fact. Living with any system that is inherently weakened in any way just makes it easier for stress to put us off the edge. My systems have been injured and a long life of wear and tear has left marks. I am just that much closer to the edge in many ways.

Add diabetes.

The stresses of the past few months have challenged all of us and I am not left out. Now I am seeing a drastic change to my blood sugar and A1C, a near loss of control and I have managed it well for many years. I am feeling that diabetes has given me a weakened system and the stress has pushed me off the edge. My Endocrinologist has floated the opinion that the long list of damages and stressors has maybe caused and now exacerbated my Diabetes. Chicken vs. egg. Either way, my omelette is slipping off the plate here.

Can anyone else share anything about their struggles with the PTSD/stress/Diabetes triangle? I have recipes, I need survival guides. Thanks
 
#2
I need survival guides
No diabetes here -yet- but food struggles in spades.

When my eating gets really bad (my sister just chewed me out, that I’m not allowed to write “chicken” down in a food diary, when I’ve been eating the same chicken thigh for 3 days. I have a rule against writing amounts down, because I get competitive, but -to be fair- she does have a point.) I’ll sometimes wear an “I hate you” :shifty: on my wrist. It’s just a timer. Technically a dedicated watch (that I don’t love ;)) that goes off every 3 hours.

It goes off.
I glare at it. &/or use some colorful language.
I eat something.

It lets me direct my anger at the timer, instead of at myself or what I’m eating.

I’ve developed a bit of fondness for my “I hate you” over the years. But I’m contrary like that. :sneaky: When my last one finally died, I’d been promising to huck it off a cliff, but gave it a little Viking funeral instead.

I stole this trick from my uncle, who IS diabetic, so figured it might maybe help. He used an old school 2 bells alarm clock, that he’d chuck a shoe at to turn off, and then would laugh at it. “The alarm clock can take it. My body can’t. Besides. It’s fun. I was never allowed to throw balls in the house, as a kid. Now I’m all grown up, and can throw whatever I durn please.” He drove my aunt keeerazy with the shoe thing. But not hearing the resulting crash one afternoon when she was expecting it, was what led her to finding him in the garage where he’d been working on one of his project cars, in time to get him to the hospital. You’d think she’d have warmed to the thrown shoes after that... but not so much.
 

Teasel

MyPTSD Pro
#3
Prediabetic here. Worsened enormously by a few months on Mirtazapine. It will take me a long time to get back to where I was before taking that medication, if I even get there.

Reducing carbs and increasing exercise is my plan. It won't be easy for me, I have issues with "comfort" eating and depression and greatly reduced strength and fitness amongst other things but there we are.
 
#4
I don't have diabetes. And I'm not pre-diabetic either.

However, I used to be friends with a guy who drank massive amounts of soda. I told him that he may end up with diabetes someday if he keeps it up.

But he told me that he wasn't worried about it. I couldn't get through to him. He didn't see how serious getting diabetes is.

End up with diabetes because of drinking way too much Mountain Dew soda, and then try telling me that it's no big deal and that it isn't something to be worried about.
 

enough

MyPTSD Pro
Thread starter #5
Reducing carbs and increasing exercise is my plan
yep, thats an easy switch for me. I was losing 2 lb. a week but I lost momentum, switching to low carb everything has me back on the same loss rate, but my sugars are for crap. I either fix it or I am an insulin dependant diabetic.
I found that spinach based tortillas make the switch easier, instead of a sandwich I make a wrap and don't use anything like mayo or mustard on it. Works for me.
Too hot for exercise, my job and my weekend yard work is exercise enough for my old frame. Sweat equals exercise, walking across the parking lot causes sweat, so I get more exercise in the summer automatically.
Hope you can clear yourself of the anti-depressant. Sounds like that one was not even close to a fit for you. That sucks.
 

enough

MyPTSD Pro
Thread starter #6
End up with diabetes because of drinking way too much Mountain Dew soda
yeah, thats a common thread amongst many diabetics. I haven't been a soda guy since my twenties, should have stopped before that. A whole lot of people are totally unaware of the amount of sugar in those sodas, and even fewer would see that sugar in a fruit juice is still sugar and pretty close to the same amount depending on the brand.
 
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