Mindfulness, meditation and buddhism

Digz

MyPTSD Pro
My T began me on a journey of yoga for body awareness and mindful relaxation. I am still doing some yoga, although I have reactive arthritis currently so can only do small amounts, but I'm becoming very interested in meditation and the principles of buddhism. I don't believe in a god or deity of any kind and I'm not sure that I believe in the concept of reincarnation that can be part of buddhism but I find the 'three marks of existence' very interesting and helpful on this journey. The three marks of existence are 'Annica' which relates to a kind of impermanence in life, 'Dukkah' which relates to an unease experienced in life and 'Anatta' which relates to the idea of not-self that points to the objective reality surrounding self.

I am only just starting on this journey and learning about, but I find these principles very helpful, especially when it comes to mindfulness. Especially when I relate those three marks of existence together, it tends to ease my mind when I remember that life has impermanence as does unease and point myself towards the not-self. It is similar to the principles of grounding and mindfulness, but there's something in the buddhism representation that I find speaks to me more and is more calming than simply grounding and trying to be mindful in the western cultural way.

Has anybody else got into buddhism on their journey to deal with trauma? I think I will continue trying to learn more and work with the elements that connect to me.
 

Eagle3

MyPTSD Pro
I have. I've really gravitated towards Buddhist ideas as I heal from my trauma. I tend toward the Secular Humanist variety of it, but I love the concepts surrounding the Nature of Existence and such. The concept of Equanimity has REALLY helped me both emotionally and with my ability to interact with humans I'm not fond of (and even those I AM fond of!). This is something I would love to discuss in greater detail too! I've become such a fan of Buddhism that I've found a Buddhist college that offers a Master's of Divinity and I've seriously been thinking about that as a future possibility, even though I still consider myself completely areligious (just highly spiritual!).

I know religion and spiritual philosophies can be a hot-button topic around here, but finding paths that are diametrically opposed to the beliefs I was raised in has really been a healing journey for me, and helped me learn new behaviors even when triggered. I'm a fan of finding whatever works for you, but Buddhist ideas are a HUGE part of my healing journey.
 

Digz

MyPTSD Pro
I know religion and spiritual philosophies can be a hot-button topic around here, but finding paths that are diametrically opposed to the beliefs I was raised in has really been a healing journey for me, and helped me learn new behaviors even when triggered. I'm a fan of finding whatever works for you, but Buddhist ideas are a HUGE part of my healing journey.
I think there is such a difference between religion and a sense of spirituality. Some people refer to buddhism as a religion, but others don't and for me I don't see it as a religion. I'm entirely atheist but I believe in a spirituality that relates to our mind and our connection to nature. I really like the principles of Dāna (generosity), Sīla (proper conduct), Nekkhamma (renunciation), Paññā (wisdom), Viriya (energy), Khanti (patience), Sacca (honesty), Adhiṭṭhāna (determination), Mettā (Good-Will), Upekkhā (equanimity).
I find that a lot of these values or guiding principles are a lot of the stuff that I already felt but without words and focus. Then there are some values that a newer to me but which make perfect sense to me also.
 

Eagle3

MyPTSD Pro
As a martial artist I find the greatest commonality with Shambhala Buddhism, even though I tend more towards esoteric spiritual ideas and Nature-based practices as well. I'm just a convoluted mess, but it works for me, and gives some meaning to my life. For the longest time I thought I'd be ok without a spiritual practice, but found that I needed some belief system to connect with Ideas outside of myself. I needed something to give my existence meaning in the grand scheme of the Universe. I found that path, and Buddhist philosophy was a BIG part of my ability to connect with humanity again. I will be forever grateful for that.
 

Athill

Policy Enforcement
Yes, Zen Buddhism is a big part of my life. It's quite a bit less metaphysical than other schools of Buddhism, but it really helps me deal with a lot of my issues. I meditate twice a day, when I'm on point, and have a little Buddha shrine thingy. I like that there's no deity to worship, and that it's a guide to living a good life without a lot of the weird dogma and institutionalism that other religions have.
 
I used to be a pretty hardcore Theravada Buddhist practitioner in the years between my traumatic events and the time I started getting treatment. It probably kept me alive. And although I very much appreciate the precepts and other trappings, I really don't practice it anymore.

I should probably work on my meditation and mindfulness, but I don't think I'll get back into it again.
 

grit

Not Active
Thank you for sharing. I follow these way of thinking but do not take it too seriously or attach myself cause I like to empty my mind but I appreciate how you put them so simply and easily digestible manner.

I am somewhat conscious of these cause they require me to relate and socialize:
Dāna (generosity), Sīla (proper conduct), Khanti (patience), Sacca (honesty), Adhiṭṭhāna (determination), Mettā (Good-Will), .

I struggle with this often cause I have doubts and it feels like disappearing or nihilism:
Nekkhamma (renunciation)

I wish it often I could access my wisdom in art, in writing or even just thinking and my energy (attention) questionable and equanimity - so rare comes and goes and I have no idea how to cultivate it on demand - maybe that is the problem?):
Paññā (wisdom), Viriya (energy), Upekkhā (equanimity)

Thank you for sharing though!
 

Digz

MyPTSD Pro
Thank you for sharing. I follow these way of thinking but do not take it too seriously or attach myself cause I like to empty my mind but I appreciate how you put them so simply and easily digestible manner.

I am somewhat conscious of these cause they require me to relate and socialize:
Dāna (generosity), Sīla (proper conduct), Khanti (patience), Sacca (honesty), Adhiṭṭhāna (determination), Mettā (Good-Will), .

I struggle with this often cause I have doubts and it feels like disappearing or nihilism:
Nekkhamma (renunciation)

I wish it often I could access my wisdom in art, in writing or even just thinking and my energy (attention) questionable and equanimity - so rare comes and goes and I have no idea how to cultivate it on demand - maybe that is the problem?):
Paññā (wisdom), Viriya (energy), Upekkhā (equanimity)

Thank you for sharing though!

It is tricky and I am just learning. I must confess though, I am taking what I like and believe for myself, not necessarily all. I too like the values of generosity, proper conduct etc.
I do not really think I like or believe in the concept of reincarnation, but I think that is the beauty of this way of thinking, you can embrace what is beneficial to you and leave what you think is not. :)
 

whiteraven

MyPTSD Pro
Has anybody else got into buddhism on their journey to deal with trauma? I
Oh, yeah. My T is a Zen priest and monk, author of Buddhist and mindfulness books, and teaches mindfulness. He doesn't push any of it, but I was a (sometimes) practicing Buddhist before I started seeing him, so using mindfulness just sort of naturally followed. Compassion and impermanence have been two really important things in my healing, along with mindfulness.
 

Digz

MyPTSD Pro
Compassion and impermanence have been two really important things in my healing, along with mindfulness.

Yes, I am really drawn to these ideas. I have already found the concept of 'impermanence' to be very beneficial and I only read about it a week ago!

It's pretty awesome having a monk as a T!
 

Eagle3

MyPTSD Pro
My T isn't a monk, but he is a practicing Buddhist. Sure makes things so much easier to talk about. He never talks about it unless I bring it up, but the way he incorporates mindfulness and other meditation practices to therapy is incredible. Yeah, I'm a fan of Buddhist philosophies as a way to heal from trauma.
 

Digz

MyPTSD Pro
My T isn't a monk, but he is a practicing Buddhist. Sure makes things so much easier to talk about. He never talks about it unless I bring it up, but the way he incorporates mindfulness and other meditation practices to therapy is incredible. Yeah, I'm a fan of Buddhist philosophies as a way to heal from trauma.

That's fantastic. I have just ordered an introductory book by the Dalai Lama to reading during what will be our big summer break here, that is beginning at the end of this week. I'm very much looking forward to understanding it better and working out how to use it best in my life and recovery.
 
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