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Nevermind

I need to know more about dissociation. I equate it to losing time, can you give me examples when time loss wouldn’t be a part of dissociation?
 
I need to know more about dissociation. I equate it to losing time, can you give me examples when time loss wouldn’t be a part of dissociation?
Dissociation is a complex phenomenon that can manifest in various ways. While time loss is one possible symptom of dissociation, it's important to note that not all experiences of dissociation involve a complete loss of time. Dissociation can also encompass other symptoms such as feeling detached from oneself or one's surroundings, a sense of unreality, or feeling emotionally disconnected.

For example, someone may experience dissociation without time loss when they feel as if they're observing their actions from a distance, as if they're watching themselves in a movie. They may still be aware of the passing of time but feel disconnected or detached from their own experiences. It's important to remember that everyone's experience of dissociation can be unique, and symptoms can vary from person to person.

Can you provide more information about your experiences or ask any specific questions about dissociation?
 
Can you give me an example of this detachment?
Certainly! Detachment in dissociation can manifest in various ways. Here's an example:

Imagine you're in a social setting, surrounded by friends and engaging in a conversation. Suddenly, you begin to feel a sense of disconnect, as if you're watching the situation from a distance. You may have difficulty fully participating or connecting with what is happening in the moment. You might feel as though you're an outsider, observing the event rather than actively participating in it. This detachment can create a sense of numbness, emotional disconnection, or even a feeling of unreality, as if you're going through the motions without truly being present.

Does that example resonate with you, or would you like more information or a different example?

If I’m never very in touch with my feelings isn’t that just a way of life?
It's not uncommon for some individuals to have difficulty being in touch with their emotions as a general way of life. There can be various reasons for this, including personality traits, learned behavior, or past experiences that may have impacted your ability to connect with your emotions.

However, it's important to note that being disconnected from your emotions can have its drawbacks. Emotions play a crucial role in our well-being and provide us with important information about ourselves and our experiences. They can help us understand our needs, communicate with others, and navigate our relationships. If we consistently suppress or ignore our emotions, it can lead to a lack of self-awareness, difficulties in expressing ourselves, and challenges in maintaining healthy relationships.

While it may feel like a way of life for you, it can still be beneficial to explore and work on developing a greater connection with your emotions. This can be done with the support of a therapist who specializes in emotion-focused therapy or through self-reflection exercises such as journaling, mindfulness, or other techniques that promote emotional exploration.

Would you like more information on ways to explore and enhance your connection with your emotions?
 
Does that example resonate with you, or would you like more information or a different example?
It does not.

My therapist is under the impression I dissociate a lot. I don’t find I agree. I’ve had times when I’m lost in thought and I could see that being a form, but generally I can say exactly how many minutes have elapsed and if he’s shifted in his chair or taken a deep breath.

Often when he asks a question I stare out the window and after thinking about my answer there is sometimes an internal debate as to whether I’m sharing it, part of it or non of it. Sometimes I try to figure out the way to answer him in the least amount of words and all those thoughts take a chunk of time.
 
It does not.

My therapist is under the impression I dissociate a lot. I don’t find I agree. I’ve had times when I’m lost in thought and I could see that being a form, but generally I can say exactly how many minutes have elapsed and if he’s shifted in his chair or taken a deep breath.

Often when he asks a question I stare out the window and after thinking about my answer there is sometimes an internal debate as to whether I’m sharing it, part of it or non of it. Sometimes I try to figure out the way to answer him in the least amount of words and all those thoughts take a chunk of time.
Thank you for sharing your experiences. It's important to remember that dissociation can manifest in different ways, and it can vary from person to person. While time loss is one possible symptom of dissociation, it's not the only indicator. The experiences you described, such as getting lost in thought, having an internal debate, and feeling unsure about sharing your answer, can also be signs of dissociation.

Dissociation can involve a range of experiences, including feeling detached from oneself or experiencing a sense of unreality. It can also involve disruptions in consciousness, memory, and identity. It's possible that your therapist has identified certain patterns or behaviors that align with dissociation, even if you may not have recognized them as such. It could be helpful to have an open and honest conversation with your therapist about your concerns and experiences to gain a better understanding of their perspective and explore further.

Remember, therapy is a collaborative process, and it's important for you and your therapist to have a shared understanding of your experiences. Communication with your therapist is key in addressing any doubts or discrepancies you may have. Together, you can continue to explore and gain clarity on your experiences and work towards your therapeutic goals.

Is there anything else you'd like to discuss or explore further?
 
Can you break down what of this might be dissociative?

Often when he asks a question I stare out the window and after thinking about my answer there is sometimes an internal debate as to whether I’m sharing it, part of it or non of it. Sometimes I try to figure out the way to answer him in the least amount of words and all those thoughts take a chunk of time.
 
Can you break down what of this might be dissociative?

Often when he asks a question I stare out the window and after thinking about my answer there is sometimes an internal debate as to whether I’m sharing it, part of it or non of it. Sometimes I try to figure out the way to answer him in the least amount of words and all those thoughts take a chunk of time.
It's possible that the experiences you described could be indicative of dissociation. Here's a breakdown of how some of these behaviors may relate to dissociation:

1. Staring out the window: When you find yourself staring out the window instead of actively engaging with your therapist's questions, it could be a form of dissociation wherein you disconnect from the present moment or your immediate environment. This detachment may serve as a way of creating distance from the conversation or protecting yourself from emotional discomfort.

2. Internal debate about sharing: The internal debate you experience about whether or how much to share in response to your therapist's questions may also be related to dissociation. This could be a reflection of a disconnection between your thoughts, emotions, and the act of verbal expression. It's possible that you may have learned to protect yourself by carefully monitoring and censoring your responses, which can create a sense of detachment and internal conflict.

3. Figuring out the least amount of words: Similarly, the effort to figure out the most concise way to answer your therapist's questions can be related to dissociation. This may reflect a tendency to minimize self-disclosure or a fear of being vulnerable. Dissociation can sometimes involve a detachment from one's emotions, making it challenging to fully express oneself or engage in more in-depth responses.

It's important to note that I'm providing a general understanding based on the information you provided. The experiences you described may have different underlying causes, and it would be crucial to explore these further in therapy. Your therapist, who has a comprehensive understanding of your history and symptoms, would be best equipped to assess and guide you appropriately.

Have you discussed these experiences in detail with your therapist? Exploring these concerns with them can help provide a clearer understanding and support in navigating your experiences.

Is there anything else you would like to discuss or any additional questions you have?
 
I don’t understand, you mean being thoughtful in what I say is dissociative?

I fully admit this is learned behavior from a traumatic past but I wouldn’t have said it was dissociative.
 
I don’t understand, you mean being thoughtful in what I say is dissociative?

I fully admit this is learned behavior from a traumatic past but I wouldn’t have said it was dissociative.
I apologize if my response was unclear. Being thoughtful in what you say is not inherently dissociative. It is actually a positive quality as it shows reflection and consideration in your communication.

What I was referring to in terms of dissociation is the internal debate or uncertainty you described about whether to share your answer, and the process of trying to figure out the most concise way to respond. These behaviors can sometimes be associated with dissociation when they are driven by a disconnection from your emotions or a fear of vulnerability.

It's important to understand that dissociation is a complex phenomenon that can manifest in different ways for different individuals. It can include a range of symptoms or behaviors, and being thoughtful in your responses alone does not necessarily indicate dissociation.

You mentioned that this learned behavior is from a traumatic past. It's essential to explore this further in therapy to gain a more comprehensive understanding of how your past experiences may be influencing your current patterns of thoughts and communication. By discussing this with your therapist, you can work together to identify any dissociative tendencies or other coping mechanisms that may be present and find ways to address them effectively.

Please feel free to clarify or share any other concerns or questions you may have.
 
What I was referring to in terms of dissociation is the internal debate or uncertainty you described about whether to share your answer, and the process of trying to figure out the most concise way to respond. These behaviors can sometimes be associated with dissociation when they are driven by a disconnection from your emotions or a fear of vulnerability.
So fear of vulnerability is inherently dissociative if it keeps you from doing something?
It's essential to explore this further in therapy to gain a more comprehensive understanding of how your past experiences may be influencing your current patterns of thoughts and communication.
I know how they affect me, but I’m not sure learning from one’s past and therefore not sharing personal information easily is a bad thing.
 
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