New symptoms from CPTSD

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Hi I have cPTSD-SP with severe anxiety and panic attacks and depression.
I've recently been significantly triggered and seem to be experiencing a new symptom.
Symptom is as follows I feel really unstable, sometimes to the point I actually feel like I could fall over. I feel like my mind is floating/rocking and rolling. When its bad the rocking and rolling becomes more frequent and more intense. Eventually it feels like it gets stuck fully to one side when this happens I feel strong pain in my head. From here I lose control of my speech and start speaking gibberish even though I'm not trying to speak when this happens I feel sharp pain In my head.
Could you advise me what this could be?
 
Hi I have cPTSD-SP with severe anxiety and panic attacks and depression.
I've recently been significantly triggered and seem to be experiencing a new symptom.
Symptom is as follows I feel really unstable, sometimes to the point I actually feel like I could fall over. I feel like my mind is floating/rocking and rolling. When its bad the rocking and rolling becomes more frequent and more intense. Eventually it feels like it gets stuck fully to one side when this happens I feel strong pain in my head. From here I lose control of my speech and start speaking gibberish even though I'm not trying to speak when this happens I feel sharp pain In my head.
Could you advise me what this could be?
I'm sorry to hear that you're experiencing these distressing symptoms. While I can't provide a diagnosis, I can offer some general information and insights. It's important to consult with a healthcare professional for a thorough evaluation and diagnosis.

The symptoms you described, such as feeling unstable, experiencing mind floating/rocking/rolling, and losing control of speech, could potentially be related to dissociation. Dissociation is a common response to trauma and can manifest in various ways, including feeling detached from oneself or one's surroundings. It can also involve cognitive and physical symptoms, such as difficulty speaking or feeling physically unsteady.

It's worth mentioning these symptoms to a mental health professional who can conduct an assessment and provide a diagnosis based on your specific experiences. They may also explore other potential causes or diagnoses to rule out any medical or neurological conditions that could be contributing to your symptoms.

In the meantime, it can be helpful to engage in grounding techniques when you're feeling dissociated or unstable. Grounding techniques can help bring your attention back to the present moment and your physical surroundings. Examples include deep breathing exercises, focusing on the sensations of your body, or using objects to anchor yourself (e.g., feeling the texture of an object in your hand).

Remember to practice self-care and reach out for support when needed. Do you have any strategies that have helped you cope with dissociation in the past?
 
I used to vape cannabis when I was bad and this seemed to help with my panic attacks however it does not seem to help with above symptoms, instead it feels like it makes it worse. The only thing I've found helps is going to sleep. But when I wake the Rocking is still there just not as strong.
 
I used to vape cannabis when I was bad and this seemed to help with my panic attacks however it does not seem to help with above symptoms, instead it feels like it makes it worse. The only thing I've found helps is going to sleep. But when I wake the Rocking is still there just not as strong.
It's interesting that you mentioned how vaping cannabis used to help with your panic attacks but doesn't seem to alleviate the new symptoms you described. People can have different responses to substances, and it's possible that cannabis may have different effects depending on the specific symptoms or circumstances.

It's understandable that sleep provides some relief for you. Sleep can be restorative and provide temporary respite from distressing symptoms. It's important to prioritize good sleep hygiene to support your overall well-being.

It may be helpful to explore additional coping strategies that can be used during waking hours to manage the symptoms you described. Have you tried any grounding techniques or relaxation exercises, such as deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or guided imagery? These techniques can help regulate your nervous system and provide a sense of stability during times of distress.

Additionally, engaging in activities that promote relaxation and connection with the present moment, such as gentle stretching, mindful walking, or engaging in hobbies you enjoy, may also be beneficial.

Remember that everyone's experiences and coping strategies are unique, so it can be helpful to experiment with different approaches to find what works best for you. If the symptoms persist or worsen, it's important to reach out to a healthcare professional for further evaluation and support.

Is there anything else you would like to discuss or any other questions you have?
 
Could above symptoms be related to DID?
While I can't provide a diagnosis, I can provide some information about Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) to help you better understand its characteristics. DID is a complex dissociative disorder characterized by the presence of multiple distinct identities or personality states within an individual. These identities may have their own memories, behaviors, and experiences.

The symptoms you described, such as feeling unstable, mind floating/rocking/rolling, and experiencing loss of control of speech, can be associated with dissociation, which is a common feature of various trauma-related disorders, including DID. However, it's important to note that experiencing dissociative symptoms doesn't necessarily indicate the presence of DID.

To receive a proper diagnosis, it would be best to consult with a qualified mental health professional who can conduct a comprehensive interview and assessment. They will evaluate your symptoms, personal history, and other relevant factors in order to make an accurate diagnosis.

Keep in mind that many trauma-related disorders, including complex PTSD, can have similar symptoms to DID, making a thorough evaluation crucial for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

If you have any concerns or questions about your experiences or want to explore further, I encourage you to reach out to a mental health professional for a comprehensive evaluation and guidance.
 
How does one determine if they have DID or not?
Determining if someone has Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) involves a thorough assessment conducted by a qualified mental health professional. This assessment typically involves several components to gather information and make an accurate diagnosis. Here are some key aspects involved in the evaluation process:

1. Clinical Interview: A mental health professional will conduct a comprehensive interview to gather detailed information about your symptoms, history, and experiences. They will explore your current symptoms, any dissociative experiences, your personal background, and any history of trauma or adverse experiences.

2. Psychological Testing: Various psychological tests may be administered to assess the presence and severity of dissociative symptoms. These tests can help gather additional objective information to aid in diagnosis.

3. Collateral Information: The mental health professional may also seek information from family members, partners, friends, or other individuals who can provide insight into your experiences and behaviors. This can offer a broader perspective on your symptoms and history.

4. Diagnostic Criteria: The mental health professional will refer to the diagnostic criteria outlined in the DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) or the ICD-11 (International Classification of Diseases) to assess if the symptoms align with the diagnostic criteria for DID.

5. Differential Diagnosis: The mental health professional will also consider other possible explanations for your symptoms, ruling out other conditions that may cause similar symptoms. This is to ensure an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning.

Determining if someone has DID requires a comprehensive and individualized assessment process. It's important to reach out to a mental health professional qualified in trauma and dissociation for an accurate evaluation.

If you're concerned about your experiences, I encourage you to seek a professional evaluation. They can help provide clarity and guidance based on your specific situation.
 
Could you list all grounding techniques
Certainly! Here are some commonly used grounding techniques that you can try:

1. 5-4-3-2-1 Technique: Name 5 things you can see, 4 things you can touch, 3 things you can hear, 2 things you can smell, and 1 thing you can taste. This helps bring your attention to the present moment.

2. Progressive Muscle Relaxation: Start by tensing and then relaxing each muscle group in your body, beginning with your toes and moving upward. This helps release tension and promotes relaxation.

3. Breath Awareness: Focus on your breath, paying attention to the sensation of each inhale and exhale. You can also try deep breathing exercises, such as diaphragmatic breathing, to promote relaxation.

4. Grounding Objects: Hold a small object in your hand that has a comforting texture, such as a smooth stone or a stress ball. Focus on the sensations in your hand to anchor yourself in the present.

5. Visualization: Imagine yourself in a safe and calming place, such as a favorite beach or a peaceful garden. Engage your senses by envisioning the sights, sounds, smells, and tactile sensations of that place.

6. Engaging the Senses: Engage your senses by noticing the details of your surroundings. Pay attention to the colors, textures, sounds, smells, and tastes around you.

7. Self-Talk: Repeat positive affirmations or calming statements to yourself, such as "I am safe," "I can handle this," or "This feeling will pass." This can help redirect your focus and provide reassurance.

Remember, grounding techniques can be unique to each individual, so it's important to explore different options and find what works best for you. Additionally, grounding techniques are most effective when practiced consistently, especially during times of distress.

If you would like more information or specific instructions on any of these techniques, feel free to ask.
 
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