Ongoing dysregulation of my nervous system - will it ever end?

SpookyMumma

New Here
Hi everyone I'm new.
My name is Shannan and about 4 months ago I started experiencing PTSD. I was struggling so took some antidepressants (prescribed) which caused insomnia thus worsening the PTSD and I've been experiencing dysregulation of my nervous system since.
The trauma (non violent, we were very young and I'm pretty certain he didn't know what he was doing) was to do with a sibling, and as I wasn't aware of this until recently we still have a relationship. I think this is why I've been struggling with it so much as there are many things that remind me of him and I actually do see him still too.
However, I'm in therapy and mentally I'm doing a lot better. My body just isn't catching up and it's so frustrating.
I'm absolutely exhausted constantly (having an early rising toddler doesn't help!).
Severe brain fog - don't feel like I'm really here most of the time and fairly regular nausea/over eating.
Pain in my lower back and shoulder almost constantly. (been to doctors and they won't do anything for me for free)
And other things that come and go!
Does this get better??
I want my energetic, gym/swim loving, wine swilling self back and it seems so far away :(
Any tips, advice or success stories very appreciated!!
 
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Friday

Moderator
Will it ever end?

The vast majority (I’ve read numbers ranging from 93% to 96%) reach asymptomatic -completely recovered &/or exquisitely managed- even though later relapses are always possible. Like managing diabetes with exercise and diet, alone? A person still HAS diabetes, even if they don’t experience any of the symptoms or effects of it.

The remaining 4%-7% who will experience PTSD symptoms off and on their whole lives? Aren’t stupid, as a general rule. So they/we figure out how to work with it, and around it, and do the whole improvise, adapt, overcome thing. Again, not a lot different from having diabetes, or asthma, or any of a whole host of relapsing and remitting conditions.

Any tips, advice or success stories very appreciated!!
Most useful thing I’ve ever come across >>> The ptsd cup explanation
 

SpookyMumma

New Here
Will it ever end?

The vast majority (I’ve read numbers ranging from 93% to 96%) reach asymptomatic -completely recovered &/or exquisitely managed- even though later relapses are always possible. Like managing diabetes with exercise and diet, alone? A person still HAS diabetes, even if they don’t experience any of the symptoms or effects of it.

The remaining 4%-7% who will experience PTSD symptoms off and on their whole lives? Aren’t stupid, as a general rule. So they/we figure out how to work with it, and around it, and do the whole improvise, adapt, overcome thing. Again, not a lot different from having diabetes, or asthma, or any of a whole host of relapsing and remitting conditions.


Most useful thing I’ve ever come across >>> The ptsd cup explanation
Thank you very much, this gives me a lot of hope!
 

12birds

Confident
It does get better. You are doing yourself a favor being in therapy, especially while you are juggling other important things.

PTSD absolutely impacts how our bodies function and that can be frustrating. Try checking in with yourself and making note of how you feel. You don't have to do anything with it, sometimes just acknowledging can help.

It sounds like you are advocating for yourself and that is a very good thing.
 

Survivor3

MyPTSD Pro
Hi @SpookyMumma it's good that you want your old self back and to do the things that you used to do. When we have been struggling and having a bad patch sometimes we don't do certain things. It takes time to recover. Try and just do one thing now and again to get used to it again.
 

Freddyt

MyPTSD Pro
I'm absolutely exhausted constantly (having an early rising toddler doesn't help!).
Severe brain fog - don't feel like I'm really here most of the time and fairly regular nausea/over eating.
Pain in my lower back and shoulder almost constantly. (been to doctors and they won't do anything for me for free)
And other things that come and go!
Had all that (except the toddler).....still have some of it.

-Exhausted? Just all the time. It follows my mental state a lot too. Just like sleep and about everything else. I am doing EMDR therapy and I find when I'm doing reprocessing for something the harder that stuff is to deal with the more my PTSD symptoms are active. Then sleep suffers etc. It's just part of the joys of PTSD.

- Brain fog can have many sources, make sure your doc is doing blood work and checking for thyroid and other issues like adrenal function. Add in the eating and nausea and you may be dealing with physical problems as well as mental. I have three sources of brain fog at least, Addison's, Thyroid, and PTSD.

- Pain in the back - mine has been 95% better since starting to deal with my trauma. Many years of fight or flight lead to muscle tension that caused pain and other issues. When it unlocked itself it was like heaven. Still it's like my barometer for PTSD. When my neck and shoulders start tightening up there is a reason for that tension.

There is lots of other stuff under the "comes and goes" banner. I find some of how I deal with them depends on where I'm at with PTSD that day. Sometimes it's just about getting through today and sometimes I can deal with all of it.
 
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