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PTSD - Do you ever really recover?

_-yeah_nah-_

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I have cPTSD-SP with severe panic attacks + anxiety + depression.
And I'm wondering, Do you ever really recover, from PTSD?
As the trauma will always be there.
Is it even possible? or is it basically a case of getting yourself to a place where you can live with it.
 
I have cPTSD-SP with severe panic attacks + anxiety + depression.
And I'm wondering, Do you ever really recover, from PTSD?
As the trauma will always be there.
Is it even possible? or is it basically a case of getting yourself to a place where you can live with it.
I'm truly sorry to hear that you're experiencing cPTSD-SP with severe panic attacks, anxiety, and depression, @_-yeah_nah-_.
Your question about recovery from PTSD is an important and complex one. Recovery can be a unique and individual journey for each person. While the trauma may always be a part of your life, it is possible to find healing, develop coping strategies, and experience an improved overall quality of life. It may be helpful to reframe the concept of recovery in the context of working towards post-traumatic growth and resilience.

The goal of treatment is often to decrease symptoms, improve functionality, and enhance one's ability to cope with and manage the effects of trauma. Therapy, medication (if appropriate), and self-care practices can all play a role in this process.

May I ask if you have engaged in any form of therapy or treatment for your PTSD symptoms?
 
Medication
Mindfulness/meditation
Been seeing a psychologist
Been seeing a psychiatrist
Starting to chat more in online group therapy.
 
Medication
Mindfulness/meditation
Been seeing a psychologist
Been seeing a psychiatrist
Starting to chat more in online group therapy.
Thank you for sharing the steps you've already taken, @_-yeah_nah-_.

It's great to hear that you're utilizing medication, mindfulness/meditation, and engaging with both a psychologist and psychiatrist. These are all valuable forms of support and treatment for PTSD symptoms. Group therapy can also provide a sense of community and understanding among peers who have experienced similar challenges.

Have you noticed any improvements or changes in your symptoms since starting these various forms of support?
 
Yes, but not from the therapy yet.
Only from
Medication
Mindfulness/meditation
It's encouraging to hear that you've noticed improvements in your symptoms through medication and mindfulness/meditation, @_-yeah_nah-_.

Therapy is a process that can take time, and it's not uncommon for progress to be gradual. Different therapeutic approaches, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), or dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), may be beneficial for individuals with PTSD.

If you feel that therapy hasn't been as helpful so far, it could be useful to discuss this with your therapist. Open communication is essential for effective therapy, and they may be able to adjust the treatment approach or explore new techniques that could better support your healing process.

In the meantime, continue to utilize the techniques and strategies that have been helpful for you, including medication and mindfulness/meditation. Remember to be patient with yourself and acknowledge the progress you have made so far.

Is there anything specific you would like support or guidance with regarding your therapy or other aspects of your PTSD symptoms?
 
I think I was locked (twice) in a state of brutal MURDER/rage/survival, that I could not get out of. Thankfully it did not happen. But I spent a long time there... way too long. Two separate 6 month states.
I am nor religious, but I can only compare it to hell if there were such a place.

The drug cocktail + noise cancelling headphones with the right tunes eventually brought me back but since then now I have amnesia of the traumas/feeling that made me feel this way. However I went through it in detail with multiple therapists. My current therapists advised me not to continue uncovering these events.

Honestly I actually don't care about the original traumas now I just want to get better. But I feel now I have another trauma, one that I seem to be unable to deal with. It's how I ended up here. I was running my own successful software platform for many years then this happened literally overnight. Many years later I am still unable to work, instead I'm still trying/struggling to recover just to survive.
I just can't deal with how this happened?
 
I think I was locked (twice) in a state of brutal MURDER/rage/survival, that I could not get out of. Thankfully it did not happen. But I spent a long time there... way too long. Two separate 6 month states.
I am nor religious, but I can only compare it to hell if there were such a place.

The drug cocktail + noise cancelling headphones with the right tunes eventually brought me back but since then now I have amnesia of the traumas/feeling that made me feel this way. However I went through it in detail with multiple therapists. My current therapists advised me not to continue uncovering these events.

Honestly I actually don't care about the original traumas now I just want to get better. But I feel now I have another trauma, one that I seem to be unable to deal with. It's how I ended up here. I was running my own successful software platform for many years then this happened literally overnight. Many years later I am still unable to work, instead I'm still trying/struggling to recover just to survive.
I just can't deal with how this happened?
I'm sorry to hear that you've experienced such intense and distressing states, @_-yeah_nah-_.

It sounds like you've been through some extremely difficult times, and I want to acknowledge your strength and resilience in seeking help and continuing to work towards recovery.

It's not uncommon for individuals with PTSD to experience amnesia or gaps in memory surrounding traumatic events. The mind can protect itself by suppressing or blocking out memories that are too overwhelming to process. It's also important to respect your current therapist's advice regarding not delving further into those specific events if they believe it could potentially be retraumatizing for you.

Regarding the impact of these events on your ability to work and your current struggle to recover, it is understandable that you may be grappling with feelings of frustration, confusion, and a sense of loss. Trauma can have profound effects on many aspects of life, including one's career and daily functioning.

Have you explored any strategies or interventions to help cope with the challenges of not being able to work? It could be helpful to engage in vocational rehabilitation services, career coaching, or explore alternative avenues for fulfilling activities or work that align with your current abilities and limitations.

Additionally, support groups or communities of individuals who have faced similar challenges related to trauma and career can provide valuable insights and encouragement.

Remember to be patient and kind to yourself as you navigate this journey of recovery. Healing can take time, and it's important to make self-care and self-compassion a priority.

Is there anything specific that you would like guidance or support with in relation to your struggle to recover and adapt to these changes in your life?
 
Maintaining relationships/developing new friends I struggle with this also.

Since my let's say journey through hell, twice.
I have basically cut everyone out of my life.
Bar my health professionals, my wife + son & Mum.
I find I almost can not be around safe people, which sounds weird, I know but it's like everyone I knew before this event, that knows anything at all about what I went through I don't want to be around.
I actually don't want to be around anyone, really, but I think I can deal with randoms better than friends cause I know they don't know. So I can be whoever I want to be.
I think being around those that knew me before is hard because I'm a very different person to what I was before.
And being around them reminds me of this.

I have heard this quote somewhere,
Find your people.
I guess that is why alot of us are here to find our people. People that can understand.
 
Maintaining relationships/developing new friends I struggle with this also.

Since my let's say journey through hell, twice.
I have basically cut everyone out of my life.
Bar my health professionals, my wife + son & Mum.
I find I almost can not be around safe people, which sounds weird, I know but it's like everyone I knew before this event, that knows anything at all about what I went through I don't want to be around.
I actually don't want to be around anyone, really, but I think I can deal with randoms better than friends cause I know they don't know. So I can be whoever I want to be.
I think being around those that knew me before is hard because I'm a very different person to what I was before.
And being around them reminds me of this.

I have heard this quote somewhere,
Find your people.
I guess that is why alot of us are here to find our people. People that can understand.
Thank you for sharing your struggle with maintaining relationships and developing new friendships, @_-yeah_nah-_.

It's not uncommon for individuals who have gone through traumatic experiences to find it challenging to be around people who knew them before the event(s) occurred. Trauma can change a person's perspective, beliefs, and even their sense of self. It's natural to feel disconnected or like a different person after such experiences.

Finding your people, as you mentioned, can be incredibly beneficial. Connecting with others who have experienced similar challenges can create a sense of understanding, validation, and support. Forums and support groups, like the one you are currently in, can offer a space to meet others who can relate to your experiences.

In addition to online communities, you may also consider seeking out local support groups or organizations that focus on trauma recovery or specific interests/hobbies you enjoy. Engaging in activities or groups centered around shared interests can provide an opportunity to meet like-minded individuals and potentially form new connections.

It's important to remember that rebuilding relationships and forming new friendships takes time and patience. It's okay to take things at your own pace and prioritize your well-being throughout the process. Self-compassion is key.

Is there anything specific you would like guidance or support with in relation to maintaining relationships or developing new friendships?
 
Maintaining relationships/developing new friends I struggle with this also.

Since my let's say journey through hell, twice.
I have basically cut everyone out of my life.
Bar my health professionals, my wife + son & Mum.
I find I almost can not be around safe people, which sounds weird, I know but it's like everyone I knew before this event, that knows anything at all about what I went through I don't want to be around.
I actually don't want to be around anyone, really, but I think I can deal with randoms better than friends cause I know they don't know. So I can be whoever I want to be.
I think being around those that knew me before is hard because I'm a very different person to what I was before.
And being around them reminds me of this.

I have heard this quote somewhere,
Find your people.
I guess that is why alot of us are here to find our people. People that can understan
Have you explored any strategies or interventions to help cope with the challenges of not being able to work? It could be helpful to engage in vocational rehabilitation services, career coaching, or explore alternative avenues for fulfilling activities or work that align with your current abilities and limitations.
Strategies
High doses of medication
Noise cancelling headphones
Meditation/mindfulness.
Minimising stresses/avoidance

The thought of returning to work freaks me out atm, due to the way my triggering event took place. I feel like I'm just going to repeat this all over again, I feel I have a real block here.
 
Strategies
High doses of medication
Noise cancelling headphones
Meditation/mindfulness.
Minimising stresses/avoidance

The thought of returning to work freaks me out atm, due to the way my triggering event took place. I feel like I'm just going to repeat this all over again, I feel I have a real block here.
It's understandable that the thought of returning to work can be triggering and anxiety-provoking for you based on your past experiences, @_-yeah_nah-_.

Working through these fears and addressing the block you feel is an important step towards healing and regaining a sense of control in your life. Here are some strategies that might help:

1. Gradual exposure: Consider starting with small steps towards reentering the workforce. This could involve engaging in volunteer work or taking on part-time or freelance projects that allow you to ease back into a work routine at your own pace.

2. Therapeutic support: Continuing therapy or seeking out a trauma-informed therapist specifically trained in helping individuals with PTSD and work-related challenges can be immensely beneficial. They can provide guidance, support, and help you develop coping strategies to manage triggers and navigate the fears surrounding work.

3. Building a safe structure: Create a supportive environment that promotes your well-being at work. This could involve setting boundaries, communicating your needs to colleagues or supervisors, and implementing self-care practices during breaks.

4. Self-reflection and self-compassion: Take time to reflect on the skills, strengths, and interests you still possess that may contribute to your success in a work setting. Practice self-compassion by acknowledging the progress you have made so far and being patient with yourself as you navigate this process.

Remember, everyone's recovery journey is unique, and it's essential to prioritize your mental health and well-being. Taking steps towards reentering the workforce can be challenging, but with appropriate support and self-care, it is possible to gradually overcome the block you are experiencing.

If you feel comfortable, it might be helpful to discuss these strategies with your current therapist or seek additional guidance and support from a trauma-informed professional.

Is there anything else you would like to discuss or any specific challenges you would like guidance on regarding your fear of returning to work?
 
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