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Responsabilities

  • Thread starter Deleted member 53709
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Deleted member 53709

How to take responsability for your triggers without taking the responsability of the things and people that have traumatized you?
 
How to take responsability for your triggers without taking the responsability of the things and people that have traumatized you?
Taking responsibility for your triggers while acknowledging that you are not responsible for the trauma you have experienced can be challenging but attainable. It's essential to remember that responsibility lies in how you respond to and manage your triggers, rather than placing blame for the trauma itself.

Here are a few steps that may help:

1. Validate your emotions: Recognize that it's natural to have triggers due to past trauma. Validate your feelings and remind yourself that your reactions are understandable given your experiences.

2. Self-awareness: Develop self-awareness around your triggers. Reflect on what situations, thoughts, or sensations tend to trigger you. Understanding your triggers can help you anticipate and prepare for them.

3. Coping strategies: Learn and practice healthy coping strategies to manage your triggers. This may include deep breathing exercises, grounding techniques, engaging in hobbies, or seeking support from loved ones.

4. Communication and boundaries: Communicate your triggers to those close to you, if you feel comfortable doing so. Establish boundaries with others, informing them about behaviors or topics that may trigger you, allowing for a more supportive environment.

5. Self-care: Prioritize self-care activities that help you regulate your emotions and reduce stress. This might include exercise, practicing mindfulness, getting enough sleep, or engaging in activities that bring you joy.

6. Seek professional support: Consider reaching out to a trauma-informed therapist who can help you navigate and process your triggers. Professional guidance can be beneficial in developing personalized coping strategies and addressing the underlying trauma.

Remember, taking responsibility for your triggers is about owning your healing journey, not blaming yourself for the trauma. It's essential to cultivate self-compassion and remember that healing takes time. Take care of yourself and reach out for support when needed.
 
thank you

How to deal with a friend that sometimes forget and do/say triggering things? How do you place proper boundaries with them? for now i've been very angry and nasty to them everytime that happens, exacerbing my own pain in the process.

How do I practice self-care when i'm quite disabled by violent symptoms?
 
thank you

How to deal with a friend that sometimes forget and do/say triggering things? How do you place proper boundaries with them? for now i've been very angry and nasty to them everytime that happens, exacerbing my own pain in the process.

How do I practice self-care when i'm quite disabled by violent symptoms?
It can be challenging to deal with a friend who unintentionally triggers you. Setting boundaries and practicing self-care are essential steps to maintain your well-being in such situations. Here's some guidance:

1. Reflect on your boundaries: Take some time to consider what boundaries you need to set in your relationship with your friend. Think about specific behaviors, topics, or actions that are triggering for you and come up with clear and assertive ways to communicate your boundaries.

2. Communicate openly and honestly: When it feels right, communicate with your friend about your triggers and the boundaries you'd like to establish. Be honest about how certain actions or words affect you, emphasizing that it's not their fault, but rather a result of your personal experiences. Ensure your communication is non-confrontational and focused on finding a solution that works for both of you.

3. Practice effective communication: Instead of being angry or nasty, try to express your feelings calmly and assertively when your friend inadvertently does or says something triggering. Use "I" statements to express how their actions make you feel and explain the boundaries you would like to have respected.

4. Seek support: Consider reaching out to a therapist, counselor, or support group who can provide guidance specifically on navigating relationships and setting boundaries when dealing with triggers. They can offer personalized strategies and support for managing these complex dynamics.

Regarding practicing self-care when you are disabled by violent symptoms, it's crucial to find self-care activities that work for you and can be adapted to your current limitations. Some suggestions include:

1. Gentle physical activities: Engage in gentle exercises like stretching, walking, or yoga, adapting them to your physical abilities. Consult with a healthcare professional for guidance tailored to your specific needs.

2. Sensory grounding: Explore sensory grounding techniques such as deep breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, or engaging with soothing sensory objects like soft fabrics or aromatherapy.

3. Creativity and expression: Engage in activities like painting, writing, playing an instrument, or listening to calming music. Creative outlets can provide a way to express and process emotions.

4. Relaxation techniques: Practice relaxation techniques such as mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, or listening to calming audio recordings.

Remember that self-care looks different for everyone, so finding what works best for you may require some trial and error. Be patient with yourself and prioritize activities that promote relaxation, grounding, and emotional well-being.

If you feel overwhelmed and unable to manage your symptoms alone, consider reaching out to a mental health professional who can provide additional support and guidance tailored to your specific needs.
 
Often i feel the need to get back at someone triggering me. I guess I want them to suffer the way I do. An eye for an eye kind of thinking? What do I do about these feelings? I dont want to deny them but they are also destructive and I don't like the person i'm becoming with them.
 
Often i feel the need to get back at someone triggering me. I guess I want them to suffer the way I do. An eye for an eye kind of thinking? What do I do about these feelings? I dont want to deny them but they are also destructive and I don't like the person i'm becoming with them.
It's understandable to feel a desire for others to understand and empathize with your pain, especially when you have been triggered by someone. However, acting on those feelings in a retaliatory manner can be ultimately destructive and harmful to yourself and others. It's important to find healthier ways to cope with these emotions. Here are some suggestions:

1. Self-awareness: Acknowledge and accept your feelings without judgment. Recognize that it's normal to feel anger, frustration, or a desire for vindication. Understanding your emotions is the first step towards finding healthier responses.

2. Emotional regulation: Practice techniques to manage and regulate intense emotions. Deep breathing exercises, mindfulness, or grounding techniques can help in bringing your emotions to a more manageable level.

3. Empathy and perspective-taking: Try to understand the perspective of the person who triggered you. Recognize that they may not fully comprehend the impact of their words or actions. This doesn't excuse their behavior, but empathizing with their limitations can help you find a more compassionate and constructive response.

4. Express your feelings constructively: Instead of seeking revenge, find healthy ways to express your emotions. Consider journaling, talking to a trusted friend or therapist, or engaging in creative outlets that allow you to process and release your emotions in a non-harmful manner.

5. Seek support: Reach out to a therapist or support group specializing in trauma to process your feelings and develop healthier coping strategies. They can offer guidance and support as you work through these challenging emotions.

Remember, seeking revenge may offer temporary satisfaction, but it often perpetuates a cycle of pain and hinders your healing process. By focusing on your own growth and finding constructive ways to manage your emotions, you can reclaim your power and move towards a healthier and more fulfilling life.

If you find yourself struggling with these feelings or need further support, don't hesitate to reach out again.
 
thanks Doc
You're welcome! I'm here to support you on your healing journey. Remember, you're not alone in this, and reaching out for help is a sign of strength. Take care of yourself and reach out whenever you need support. You're doing great!
 
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