River Oaks vs. Sheppard Pratt?! What do you know about them? Ahh help!

penguinuser

New Here
Really struggling (okay maybe panicking) about choosing between River Oaks and Sheppard Pratt. River Oaks I know next to nothing about, and Sheppard Pratt, alternatively, has a really good reputation. (Their waiting list is 4 months though!)
  • Any suggestions in deciding?
  • If you've been to one, what was your experience like?
  • Does River Oaks have a good reputation for its trauma program?
  • How would you compare the two if you've been to both or even just know a bit about them?
  • If you've been to either, what were the methods used for processing trauma itself?
BTW, I just joined this forum after a lot of reading but not registering. Glad to be here.
 

FauxLiz

Sponsor
@penguinuser I can't speak for Sheppard Pratt but I did go to River Oaks twice in 2018 early and then later (usually 12 months a part but I had a break in employment and had been released early so it was not the norm) . Granted that was pre-Covid so I can't speak for the changes the pandemic has had made to the program but it is a good program. They use a lot of DBT but they also had EMDR trained therapists when I was there. Now as I said things may have changed but if I had to break it down these are what I would consider the major pros and cons for River Oaks as a program looking back 4 years now (wow hadn't thought like that)

Pros:
Small Census
They are Co-Ed but at the time had a maximum of 10 women and 10 men in but it was unusual to have that many and with Covid I don't know if they would have that many as that would have everyone in double rooms
Two Trauma tracks - Stabilization and Processing, they can be done concurrently but you don't have to start in stabilization if you are fully ready for processing
Good experienced clinical staff and therapist
Solid program
with tools that you can take home with you after discharge to continue working on with your therapist

Cons:
If it hasn't changed the Trauma program shares a building/ward with the eating disorders program at River Oaks, when I was there this was a problem for a couple of reasons. The ED program residents had privileges that the trauma residents did not and as a result there was a lot of tension between residents of the two programs. ED residents were allowed to watch TV during free time Trauma residents not, and this created issues in the common areas, due to restrictions on food and beverages for ED residents bathrooms and the kitchen areas were locked except during meal times which again as a trauma resident yet forced to be in the common area but not allowed to watch TV issues arose.
Non-clinical staff pre-covid was less than stellar and short-staffed I seriously doubt that this has improved 3 years into the pandemic
 

penguinuser

New Here
@penguinuser I can't speak for Sheppard Pratt but I did go to River Oaks twice in 2018 early and then later (usually 12 months a part but I had a break in employment and had been released early so it was not the norm) . Granted that was pre-Covid so I can't speak for the changes the pandemic has had made to the program but it is a good program. They use a lot of DBT but they also had EMDR trained therapists when I was there. Now as I said things may have changed but if I had to break it down these are what I would consider the major pros and cons for River Oaks as a program looking back 4 years now (wow hadn't thought like that)

Pros:
Small Census
They are Co-Ed but at the time had a maximum of 10 women and 10 men in but it was unusual to have that many and with Covid I don't know if they would have that many as that would have everyone in double rooms
Two Trauma tracks - Stabilization and Processing, they can be done concurrently but you don't have to start in stabilization if you are fully ready for processing
Good experienced clinical staff and therapist
Solid program
with tools that you can take home with you after discharge to continue working on with your therapist

Cons:
If it hasn't changed the Trauma program shares a building/ward with the eating disorders program at River Oaks, when I was there this was a problem for a couple of reasons. The ED program residents had privileges that the trauma residents did not and as a result there was a lot of tension between residents of the two programs. ED residents were allowed to watch TV during free time Trauma residents not, and this created issues in the common areas, due to restrictions on food and beverages for ED residents bathrooms and the kitchen areas were locked except during meal times which again as a trauma resident yet forced to be in the common area but not allowed to watch TV issues arose.
Non-clinical staff pre-covid was less than stellar and short-staffed I seriously doubt that this has improved 3 years into the pandemic
This is an invaluable review of the program. I can not thank you enough. For real!!! Thank you for taking the time to write this all out, I mean wow! I don't know how to thank you for your time. Means a lot to me. I acknowledge that things can change rapidly but this is invaluable information, regardless.
 
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