1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Romanian orphan diagnosed and medicated for schizophrenia

Discussion in 'Childhood' started by shimmerz, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. shimmerz

    shimmerz My silence spoke a thousand words you never heard Premium Member

    9,018
    30,772
    12,138
    I have a friend who is a teacher. She chats with at times about children who she feels have some trauma stuff going on. We spoke yesterday and what she told me really disturbed me.

    A fellow teacher adopted a child from Romania at 2 years old. The child is now 7. The doctors have recently diagnosed her with schizophrenia. They are dosing her with Abilify. This really hurts my heart.

    Any thoughts on this anyone? Do you think a child can have schizophrenia at 7 years old? I could really use some help with this one. I think I may be too close to it to see it clearly.
     
  2. Register to participate in live chat, PTSD discussion and more.
  3. EveHarrington

    EveHarrington _______ in progress. Premium Member

    9,717
    22,394
    11,538
    Look up Jani and Bodhi Schofield.

    Both developed schizophrenia at a very young age.

    It may not be the typical presentation of schizophrenia but it does happen.

    I don’t think it’s up to anyone else to judge.
     
    Neverthesame, Rain and shimmerz like this.
  4. She Cat

    She Cat Policy Enforcement Banned Premium Member Sponsor $100+

    10,406
    11,914
    30,463
    I guess it would depend on the treatment this child went through BEFORE it was adopted....
     
  5. Friday

    Friday Raise Hell Moderator

    13,343
    44,176
    21,983
    I’m thinking that on the surface of it, someone who specializes in working with children has sought comprehensive medical care & treatment for their child. That sounds like a good thing.

    Specifically focusing on abilify... this is one of the few psychiatric drugs that is considered safe enough for pediatrics, and of pediatric meds -esp antipsychotics / atypical antipsychotics- it has one of the lowest instances of & some of the mildest sets side effects both short & long term. It’s widely used with both autistic & bipolar children, in addition to the far more rare dx of schizophrenia. So as well as seeking help for their child, it sounds like their doctors are going the very slow / safe route in regards to their treatment. Again, that sounds like a good thing.
     
  6. Zoogal

    Zoogal I'm a VIP

    4,087
    7,848
    3,913
    That's good
     
    Congruency, shimmerz and Rain like this.
  7. shimmerz

    shimmerz My silence spoke a thousand words you never heard Premium Member

    9,018
    30,772
    12,138
    That's good to know. Thank you.
     
    KwanYingirl, Congruency and scout86 like this.
  8. Congruency

    Congruency Tumultuous Uprising Premium Member Sponsor $100+

    1,756
    5,653
    2,853
    Here's another side to the coin....
    I knew a teenager and her family through the church I attended who was treated for schizophrenia from an early age. It wasn't until she was an adult that a new psychiatrist diagnosed her with DID and said she never had schizophrenia as a child, and that it was a misdiagnosis by a child psychiatrist.
     
    Fadeaway, Anarchy, scout86 and 2 others like this.
  9. Neverthesame

    Neverthesame A Mind The Dead Have Ravaged Premium Member Donated

    1,758
    5,876
    1,693
    I know that schizophrenia is possible to develop in young children, however rare.

    I would think that it would be a good idea for the child to be monitored regularly for changes in behaviour and med adjustment, as the child's brain develops further.
    Periodic re-assesment at growth intervals, probably wouldn't be a terrible idea either.

    Though I say this purely from my opinion of "common sense".
    I seriously doubt I'm even qualified to be a layman, when it comes to pediatric psychiatry.
    In other words, what I don't know could fill a warehouse on this subject.
     
  10. pixel

    pixel Well-Known Member

    447
    1,413
    313
    Yes, this is similar to what happened to myself. Diagnosed as schizo-affective as a kid, it was revised to DID as an adult.
    I have always been annoyed at being drugged with anti-psychotics, instead of being treated. Who knows the damage those drugs do to a tender, developing brain & body?

    @shimmerz, yes, you may be too close or emotionally invested, but you also have the unique opportunity to offer to your teacher-friend a new perspective.
     
    Congruency, Anarchy and scout86 like this.
  11. KwanYingirl

    KwanYingirl I'm a VIP

    2,913
    6,167
    4,033
    The thing that worries me is that atypical antipsychotics cause an increase in prolactinnin females. Oh I should’ve said, in some cases. What this will do to her gynecological development is acwait and see I guess.
     
    Congruency and Anarchy like this.
  12. Anarchy

    Anarchy I'm a VIP

    4,476
    12,829
    4,953
    It's not just females that neuroleptics cause an increase in prolactin in.

    There's an inverse relationship between prolactin and dopamine. Anything that reduces dopamine, increases prolactin.

    All neuroleptics do this. It depends on the individual whether they end up producing milk. Some females don't, and some males do produce milk.

    @shimmerz, can you enquire about the process of reaching that diagnosis? How many opinions and what sorts of observations and assessments went into it?

    Diagnosis is far from being an exact science. In the past, the American definition of schizophrenia was found to be about five times broader than it was any where else in the world.

    That was discovered by practitioners from various countries, diagnosing the same sample of people. It illustrates how differently people who are supposed to be singing from the same hymn sheet, can interpret what's infront of them.

    Add to that, some practitioners don't believe that dissociation and dissociative parts exist. Sorry, I know that you are painfully aware of that!

    You and I are both deeply sceptical about the diagnostic priesthood and their ceremonial chemistry. I'm guessing that your friend is as well, for her to have asked for your opinion.

    It may be that the child's adoptive parents are more likely to accept the divinations at face value.

    I wish I could believe in a hell. Ceacescu (the Romanian communist era dictator, with a taste for massive palaces and delusions of a dynasty, half of the couple that was offed by their own communist party leadership ...
    He deserves to burn brightly for all of eternity

    I don't believe in a hell.
     
    pixel and scout86 like this.
Loading...
Similar Threads -
Show Sidebar