Seeking codependence

But I would appreciate knowing more about LeDoux's work.
I apologize for any confusion. Joseph LeDoux is a well-known neuroscientist and researcher who has made significant contributions to our understanding of the neuroscience of emotion and fear, particularly in the context of trauma. His work has focused on the amygdala, a brain structure involved in processing emotions and fear responses.

LeDoux's research has highlighted the role of the amygdala in the fear response, specifically in relation to the conditioning and storage of fear memories. He has also explored the ways in which traumatic experiences can lead to chronic activation of the fear system, contributing to symptoms such as hyperarousal, hypervigilance, and difficulties with emotional regulation.

One of LeDoux's notable contributions is his theory of the two pathways of fear processing. According to this theory, there are both a "low road" and a "high road" in the brain when it comes to fear responses. The low road involves a fast, unconscious pathway from the thalamus to the amygdala, allowing for quick reactions to potential threats. The high road involves a slower, more conscious processing pathway through cortical regions, allowing for more nuanced evaluation of threat stimuli.

It's important to note that while LeDoux's work provides valuable insights into the neurobiology of fear and trauma, it is just one piece of a much larger puzzle. Trauma and its impact on the brain are complex and multifaceted, and ongoing research continues to deepen our understanding of these processes.

If you are interested in learning more about LeDoux's work, I would encourage you to search for his published books and articles. Googling his name should bring up a wealth of resources to explore further.

Remember, I am here to support you, so if you have any more questions or concerns, feel free to share them.
 
research has highlighted the role of the amygdala in the fear response, specifically in relation to the conditioning and storage of fear memories. He has also explored the ways in which traumatic experiences can lead to chronic activation of the fear system, contributing to symptoms such as hyperarousal, hypervigilance, and difficulties with emotional regulation
Does his research indicate whether this 'damage' can be rewired. As fear seems to drive my survivor to make decisions that are detrimental to themselves and others
 
Does his research indicate whether this 'damage' can be rewired. As fear seems to drive my survivor to make decisions that are detrimental to themselves and others
LeDoux's research suggests that the brain's neural circuitry involved in fear responses can be modified or rewired through neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity is the brain's ability to change and adapt over time, including forming new neural connections and modifying existing ones.

While the impact of trauma on the brain and subsequent behaviors can be significant, it's important to remember that the brain has the potential for recovery and healing. With appropriate therapeutic interventions and support, individuals can work towards rewiring those fear-driven pathways and develop healthier responses.

Trauma-focused therapies, such as Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), and certain somatic-based approaches, can help survivors of trauma reprocess their traumatic experiences and develop alternative ways of thinking, feeling, and responding to fear triggers. These therapies focus on promoting adaptive coping strategies, resilience, and emotional regulation skills.

In addition to therapy, creating a supportive and safe environment can also contribute to the rewiring process. Encouraging healthy coping mechanisms, providing understanding and validation, and fostering connection and empathy can all be beneficial in supporting your loved one's recovery.

It's important to remember that this process takes time, and progress may not always be linear. Everyone's healing journey is unique, and it's essential to approach it with patience, compassion, and an understanding that setbacks can occur.

If you feel that your loved one's fear-driven decisions are detrimental to themselves and others, it may be helpful to encourage them to seek professional help from a trauma-informed therapist or counselor. They can provide personalized guidance and support tailored to their specific needs.

Remember, taking care of yourself is also crucial in supporting your loved one. Please let me know if there's anything else I can assist you with.
 
LeDoux's research suggests that the brain's neural circuitry involved in fear responses can be modified or rewired through neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity is the brain's ability to change and adapt over time, including forming new neural connections and modifying existing ones.
They've been doing trauma based therapy (EMDR) for 3+ years on and off. Their fear remains disproportionate to situations reality and they struggle to see consequences of their actions.
 
They've been doing trauma based therapy (EMDR) for 3+ years on and off. Their fear remains disproportionate to situations reality and they struggle to see consequences of their actions.
I understand that your loved one has been engaged in trauma-based therapy, specifically EMDR, for quite some time and continues to experience disproportionate fear responses and difficulty recognizing the consequences of their actions. It can be incredibly frustrating and disheartening when therapy does not yield the desired results.

While EMDR is an evidence-based therapy for trauma, it may not be the most effective approach for everyone. It's possible that your loved one might benefit from exploring alternative trauma-focused therapies or modalities, as different approaches can have varying effects on individuals.

Considering the ongoing challenges your loved one is facing, it may be helpful for them to consult with a licensed mental health professional who specializes in trauma therapy. A specialized therapist can conduct a comprehensive evaluation to better understand their symptoms and develop a personalized treatment plan that addresses their specific needs.

In addition, it's important to consider whether there may be underlying factors beyond trauma that are contributing to their difficulties, such as co-occurring mental health conditions like anxiety or personality disorders. A thorough assessment can help identify any additional areas that may need to be addressed in treatment.

Encouraging your loved one to share their concerns and frustrations with their current therapist and explore alternative therapeutic options is essential. It may take some trial and error to find the right approach and therapist that feels like the best fit for your loved one's needs.

Lastly, I want to emphasize the importance of self-care for both you and your loved one. Taking breaks, engaging in activities that promote relaxation and well-being, and seeking support from others can be crucial in managing the challenges of trauma recovery.

If there's anything else you would like to discuss or any specific concerns you have, please feel free to share.
 
I agree with everything you have written. And have made all of the suggestions, and also do look after myself. I'm now leaving them to live with their decisions, that's my boundary in action
 
I agree with everything you have written. And have made all of the suggestions, and also do look after myself. I'm now leaving them to live with their decisions, that's my boundary in action
I'm glad to hear that you have taken steps to support your loved one and prioritize your own self-care. Setting boundaries is an essential part of maintaining your own well-being while still being supportive.

Allowing your loved one to live with the consequences of their decisions can be a part of the natural learning process, especially if they struggle to recognize the impact their actions may have on themselves and others. It's important for individuals to take ownership of their choices and learn from their experiences.

While it can be difficult to step back and watch them navigate these challenges, it's important to remember that everyone has their own journey and learning process. Trusting that they have their own agency and that they will eventually find their way can be a source of empowerment for both you and your loved one.

Continue to be there for them as a source of support and remind them that you are available if they need guidance or assistance. Encouraging their autonomy while still maintaining a sense of caring can strike a balance between supporting their growth and respecting their individuality.

If there's anything else you would like to discuss or if you have any other questions, please feel free to share.
 
Not sure I can support, nor do I want to. They have made it impossible, I'm afraid.
I'm sorry to hear that you're feeling overwhelmed and unsure about being able to provide support for your loved one. It's important to prioritize your own well-being in situations where you feel that supporting them is challenging or detrimental to your own mental health.

Setting boundaries and recognizing your own limitations is a crucial aspect of self-care. It's okay to acknowledge that you may need to step back or take a break from being actively involved in their situation.

Remember, you are not responsible for fixing or carrying the burden of their struggles alone. It's important to seek support for yourself, whether that be from friends, other loved ones, or even professional help if needed.

If you feel that you're in a position where it's best for both of you to disengage, it may be helpful to communicate that boundary with your loved one in a compassionate and clear manner. Let them know that you care about their well-being but also need to prioritize your own mental health.

Ultimately, it’s important to respect your own boundaries and take care of yourself. If there's anything else you would like to discuss or if you have any other concerns, please feel free to share.
 
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