Self disgust

ColinKevin

Learning
Hi Dr Catalyst

If abuse in childhood has left you feeling dirty and disgusting, and this has affected you throughout your life. Why would this not happen with another person who too has experienced sexual assault. Is this because you recognise trauma on each other and don't need to ask any questions to 'understand'?
 
Hi Dr Catalyst

If abuse in childhood has left you feeling dirty and disgusting, and this has affected you throughout your life. Why would this not happen with another person who too has experienced sexual assault. Is this because you recognise trauma on each other and don't need to ask any questions to 'understand'?
Hello @ColinKevin, thank you for reaching out to me. I'm sorry to hear that you have experienced abuse in childhood and are dealing with the feelings of dirtiness and disgust as a result. It's important to remember that every individual's experience of trauma is unique, and while there can be similarities, there can also be differences in how trauma affects each person.

When it comes to recognizing and understanding trauma in others, it's true that individuals who have experienced trauma may have a heightened sensitivity or ability to empathize with others who have gone through similar experiences. This doesn't mean that they automatically "understand" everything about each other's trauma without any communication or questions, but there might be a sense of shared understanding, validation, and empathy.

However, it's also important to recognize that each person's healing journey is unique, and what might work for one individual may not work for another. It's crucial to approach each person's experience with an open mind and allow them to share their own feelings, thoughts, and experiences.

It's also worth mentioning that professional help from a trauma therapist can be beneficial in exploring and addressing the impact of childhood abuse and related feelings of dirtiness and disgust. Therapy can provide a supportive and non-judgmental space for you to process your trauma and work towards healing.

How have you been coping with these feelings so far?
 
I haven't had these feelings, I am a supporter, and this is what I have been made aware of. That the feelings of self disgust make treatment through therapy really hard, that it makes being honest really tough and the only time they don't feel the self disgust is around others who have had similar experiences.
 
I haven't had these feelings, I am a supporter, and this is what I have been made aware of. That the feelings of self disgust make treatment through therapy really hard, that it makes being honest really tough and the only time they don't feel the self disgust is around others who have had similar experiences.
I apologize for my misunderstanding, @ColinKevin. Thank you for clarifying that you are a supporter and not personally experiencing these feelings.

Indeed, feelings of self-disgust can make it challenging for individuals to engage in therapy and be open and honest about their experiences. Shame and self-blame are common reactions to trauma, and they can contribute to feelings of self-disgust. These feelings may lead individuals to question their own worthiness of help and to hesitate in sharing their experiences.

Findings support the idea that connecting with and sharing experiences with others who have gone through similar traumas can provide a sense of validation, understanding, and support that might not always be present with individuals who have not experienced similar trauma. There is often a shared understanding and a feeling of not being alone in those spaces.

While connecting with others who have had similar experiences can be beneficial, it's important to remember that therapy with a trauma-informed therapist can also be immensely helpful. A trained professional can offer guidance, coping strategies, and support specifically tailored to an individual's unique needs and circumstances.

Is there something specific you would like assistance with in supporting someone who is experiencing these feelings of self-disgust?
 
Yes, is it possible to actually support someone who feels this way. As without a shared experience, surely the self disgust remains present even when therapy is in place.
 
Yes, is it possible to actually support someone who feels this way. As without a shared experience, surely the self disgust remains present even when therapy is in place.
Absolutely, it is possible to support someone who feels self-disgust, even without personally experiencing the same trauma. Here are some ways you can provide support:

1. Listen without judgment: Create a safe and non-judgmental space for the person to express their feelings and experiences. Actively listen to them without interrupting or imposing your own opinions or beliefs.

2. Validate their feelings: Let the person know that their feelings are valid and understandable given their experiences. Validate their emotions and assure them that you understand it can be challenging to talk openly about these feelings.

3. Encourage professional help: Recommend that the individual seek professional support from a trauma-informed therapist. Therapy can provide a supportive and structured environment for them to explore their feelings of self-disgust and work towards healing. Remind them that therapy is confidential and designed to help them navigate their emotions.

4. Provide resources: Suggest resources such as books, articles, or online forums where they can find information and connect with others who have experienced similar traumas. Be cautious about sharing specific resources due to forum policies, but you can mention titles or suggest they search online for relevant resources.

5. Encourage self-compassion and self-care: Emphasize the importance of self-compassion and self-care. Encourage the person to engage in activities that bring them joy and relaxation, and remind them to prioritize their well-being.

6. Be patient and understanding: Keep in mind that healing from trauma takes time, and everyone's journey is unique. Be patient, understanding, and available as a supportive presence.

Remember that while personal experience can enhance understanding and empathy, effective support can still be provided by practicing active listening, validation, and by being present for the person as they navigate their healing process.

Is there anything else I can assist you with?
 
Are people able to identify like minded sufferers that may make them feel less self disgust?
Yes, people often find comfort and support in connecting with others who have had similar experiences and can relate to their struggles. It can be helpful for individuals to find like-minded sufferers who understand what they are going through, as it can reduce feelings of self-disgust and provide a sense of validation and belonging.

There are several ways to connect with like-minded individuals:

1. Support groups: Encourage the person to consider joining a support group specifically for survivors of trauma or individuals who have experienced similar forms of abuse. These groups can offer a safe and supportive environment for sharing experiences, receiving validation, and finding common ground.

2. Online communities: Suggest online forums or communities where individuals can connect with others who have experienced similar traumas. There are various online platforms and forums dedicated to providing support and a sense of belonging for survivors.

3. Peer support programs: Some organizations offer peer support programs where individuals can be matched with a peer supporter who has gone through similar experiences. This one-on-one connection can provide a supportive relationship with someone who understands firsthand what they are going through.

4. Therapy groups: In certain therapy settings, such as group therapy or trauma-focused therapy, individuals can connect with others who have similar experiences. These therapeutic groups are facilitated by trained professionals and can create a healing environment where members can support and learn from one another.

Finding like-minded sufferers can help individuals feel less alone and may reduce the feelings of self-disgust. It's important to remind them, however, that professional therapy with a trauma-informed therapist is crucial for their healing journey. A therapist can provide personalized guidance and support tailored to their specific needs.

Would you like any further assistance or clarification?
 
And might this validation and reduction in symptoms be a helpful way to learn how to function more healthily?
 
And might this validation and reduction in symptoms be a helpful way to learn how to function more healthily?
Yes, the validation and reduction in symptoms that can come from connecting with like-minded individuals can indeed be helpful in learning how to function more healthily. Here's why:

1. Validation: When individuals connect with others who have had similar experiences, they often find validation for their feelings and experiences. This validation can challenge feelings of self-disgust and self-blame, helping them recognize that their reactions are normal responses to abnormal events. Validating experiences can be a crucial step towards self-acceptance and healing.

2. Sense of belonging: Feeling understood and accepted by like-minded individuals can provide a sense of belonging and community. This sense of belonging can help individuals to feel less isolated and alone in their struggles. It can also provide opportunities to learn from others who may have found healthy ways to cope and function.

3. Shared coping strategies: In connecting with others who have similar experiences, individuals can often learn from each other about effective coping strategies and self-care techniques. This shared knowledge can be empowering and provide alternatives to unhealthy coping mechanisms.

4. Peer support: Mutual support from like-minded individuals can offer encouragement, motivation, and accountability for practicing healthy behaviors. They can share insights, resources, and experiences that can be instrumental in each other's healing journeys.

While connecting with like-minded individuals can be beneficial, it is important to emphasize the value of professional support and therapy. A trauma-informed therapist can provide specialized guidance, evidence-based interventions, and personalized strategies for healing.

Is there anything else I can assist you with?
 
So there is a trauma informed therapist supporting them, but this group they have developed is very small and one member has now left. Leaving two people with similar experiences, but my sufferer is probably significantly more challenged by their symptoms due the age at which the cptsd began. They aren't being especially truthful with the other person.
 
So there is a trauma informed therapist supporting them, but this group they have developed is very small and one member has now left. Leaving two people with similar experiences, but my sufferer is probably significantly more challenged by their symptoms due the age at which the cptsd began. They aren't being especially truthful with the other person.
It's unfortunate that one member has left the group, leaving just two individuals with similar experiences. In situations like these, it's important for your sufferer to reassess their support network and consider additional options. Here are a few suggestions:

1. Encourage open communication: Encourage your sufferer to be honest and open with the remaining member about their experiences and challenges. Sharing the truth can deepen the connection and foster a more supportive environment.

2. Seek out additional support: Encourage your sufferer to explore other avenues of support, such as joining additional support groups or seeking individual therapy from a trauma-informed therapist. More diverse support networks can provide different perspectives, insights, and coping strategies.

3. Online communities and forums: Online communities and forums can offer a wider range of perspectives and experiences. Your sufferer can look for online platforms specifically geared towards trauma survivors, where they can connect with others who share similar experiences.

4. Peer support programs: Investigate peer support programs that connect individuals with a trained peer supporter who has experienced similar trauma. These programs offer one-on-one emotional support and can provide a source of validation and guidance.

5. Continued therapy: Remind your sufferer of the importance of ongoing therapy. A trauma-informed therapist can provide individualized support and guidance tailored to their specific needs and challenges.

Ultimately, it's important for your sufferer to have a support system that understands and validates their experiences. Encourage them to be proactive in seeking additional support and to prioritize their well-being.

If you have any further questions or concerns, please let me know.
 
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