Self disgust

Yes, the dependence on one other person is very pressurising. And they seem to encourage each other to avoid and/or dissociate.
 
Yes, the dependence on one other person is very pressurising. And they seem to encourage each other to avoid and/or dissociate.
It's understandable that the dependence on one person can create pressure and potentially reinforce avoidance or dissociation behaviors. It's important for your sufferer to be aware of these dynamics and take steps to address them. Here are some suggestions:

1. Foster open communication: Encourage your sufferer to have open and honest discussions with the remaining member about their concerns regarding avoidance and dissociation. They can discuss their individual goals for healing and support each other in developing healthier coping strategies.

2. Set boundaries: Encourage your sufferer to set and communicate boundaries within the group. This can involve discussing what types of conversations or behaviors they find helpful or unhelpful, and establishing limits on discussions that may perpetuate avoidance or dissociation.

3. Encourage individual responsibility: Remind your sufferer of the importance of taking individual responsibility for their healing journey. While support from others is valuable, it is ultimately up to each person to make choices that promote their own well-being. Encourage them to seek individual therapy and actively engage in their own healing process.

4. Seek professional guidance: Recommend that your sufferer consult with their trauma-informed therapist to discuss the dynamics within the group and how they can navigate them effectively. The therapist can offer guidance on setting healthy boundaries, challenging avoidance behaviors, and finding alternative coping strategies.

5. Explore additional support: Encourage your sufferer to explore additional sources of support outside of the small group, such as support groups, therapy groups, or online communities. These additional sources of support can provide different perspectives and experiences, reducing the reliance on one person and encouraging a more well-rounded approach to healing.

Remember, your sufferer's well-being is paramount, and it's crucial for them to prioritize their own healing journey. If you have any further questions or concerns, please let me know.
 
My sufferer also reports feeling "dead inside" and this seems to have exacerbated some reckless spending.
I'm sorry to hear that your sufferer is feeling "dead inside" and experiencing reckless spending as a result. These symptoms can be indicative of emotional numbing and self-destructive coping mechanisms often associated with trauma-related conditions like PTSD and C-PTSD.

It's important to address these concerns and offer some suggestions:

1. Validate their feelings: Let your sufferer know that feeling emotionally numb is a common response to trauma. Acknowledge their experiences without judgment, emphasizing that these feelings are a result of their past experiences and not a personal failing.

2. Encourage self-reflection: Encourage your sufferer to explore the underlying emotional triggers and internal conflicts that might be contributing to their emotional numbness. This process can be facilitated through self-reflection exercises, journaling, or discussing their thoughts and feelings with a therapist or trusted support person.

3. Explore grounding techniques: Recommend grounding techniques to help your sufferer reconnect with their emotions and regain a sense of presence in the present moment. These techniques may include deep breathing exercises, focusing on sensory experiences, or engaging in mindfulness practices.

4. Address reckless spending: Reckless spending can be a manifestation of trying to fill an emotional void or seeking temporary relief from emotional distress. Encourage your sufferer to explore healthier coping mechanisms that meet their emotional needs without causing financial harm. This may involve developing a budget, seeking financial counseling, or finding alternative outlets for emotional expression, such as creative activities or physical exercise.

5. Consider professional support: Reiterate the importance of seeking professional help from a trauma-informed therapist. A therapist can provide guidance and specific interventions to address emotional numbness, self-destructive behaviors, and develop healthy coping strategies tailored to their individual needs.

It's crucial for your sufferer to take self-care seriously during this time and reach out for professional support when needed. Remember, healing takes time, and progress might be gradual. Encourage them to be patient and kind to themselves along the way.

If you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to share.
 
Address reckless spending: Reckless spending can be a manifestation of trying to fill an emotional void or seeking temporary relief from emotional distress. Encourage your sufferer to explore healthier coping mechanisms that meet
Yes I have done this, they seemed to be shocked when the reality of this is pointed out to them and say "I thought I was going to die because of how I felt so I didn't think about the consequences". But they have now made things even trickier for themselves. Which in turn is increasing the numbing.
 
Yes I have done this, they seemed to be shocked when the reality of this is pointed out to them and say "I thought I was going to die because of how I felt so I didn't think about the consequences". But they have now made things even trickier for themselves. Which in turn is increasing the numbing.
It's understandable that your sufferer may feel shocked when the consequences of their reckless spending are pointed out to them. In the midst of emotional distress, it's common for individuals to prioritize immediate relief over long-term consequences. It sounds like their actions have created additional challenges for themselves, which is likely contributing to increased emotional numbing.

Here are a few suggestions to support them through this:

1. Empathize and validate their feelings: Let your sufferer know that you understand their motivation behind their actions and recognize that they were driven by a need to cope with overwhelming emotions. Validating their feelings can help create a safe space for them to express their experiences without feeling judged.

2. Encourage reflection and self-compassion: Encourage your sufferer to reflect on their actions and the impact it has had on their well-being. Help them identify any patterns or triggers that lead to the reckless spending. Encourage self-compassion by emphasizing that everyone makes mistakes and that their well-being matters as they work towards finding healthier coping strategies.

3. Financial accountability: Assist your sufferer in developing a plan to address the financial consequences of their actions. This may include seeking support from a financial advisor or exploring resources that can help manage debt or guide them towards financial stability. Encourage them to take small, manageable steps towards resolving their financial situation, as this can decrease the added stress and improve their overall emotional well-being.

4. Collaborate with a therapist: Encourage your sufferer to work closely with a trauma-informed therapist. A therapist can help them explore the underlying emotional triggers that lead to impulsive behaviors, develop healthier coping mechanisms, and provide support while working through the challenges associated with emotional numbness.

5. Mind-body practices: Suggest incorporating mind-body practices into their routine to help increase awareness of their emotions and reconnect with their body. This might include activities such as yoga, tai chi, or meditation, which can help create a sense of grounding and reduce emotional numbness.

Remind your sufferer that healing is a process, and setbacks are common. Encourage them to continue seeking support, practicing self-compassion, and engaging in healthy coping strategies. If you have any further questions or concerns, please let me know.
 
It's crucial for your sufferer to take self-care seriously during this time and reach out for professional support when needed.

They do have professional support, but it requires a level of honesty to access this fully. They are about to join a larger support group.
 
It's crucial for your sufferer to take self-care seriously during this time and reach out for professional support when needed.

They do have professional support, but it requires a level of honesty to access this fully. They are about to join a larger support group.
That's great to hear that your sufferer already has professional support in place. Joining a larger support group can be a valuable addition to their healing journey, as it can provide additional perspectives, insights, and a sense of community.

Encourage your sufferer to approach their new support group with an open mind and a willingness to be honest and vulnerable. While it may feel uncomfortable at first, sharing their experiences and challenges with others who can relate can be immensely helpful in fostering a sense of understanding and connection.

Here are a few suggestions to navigate their new support group effectively:

1. Open up gradually: Encourage your sufferer to start sharing their experiences and challenges at their own pace. Remind them that they don't have to disclose everything right away and that it's okay to take time to build trust and rapport with the group members.

2. Support group guidelines: If the support group has guidelines or established norms, advise your sufferer to familiarize themselves with these guidelines. Discussing topics related to avoidance, dissociation, and reckless spending may be encouraged or explicitly addressed within the group. Remind them to follow the guidelines and respect the emotional boundaries of others.

3. Seek common ground: Encourage your sufferer to actively engage in conversations and seek common ground with other group members. This can help them feel less alone in their experiences and provide opportunities for shared learning and growth.

4. Practice active listening: Encourage your sufferer to practice active listening skills during group sessions. By attentively listening to others' stories and experiences, they can gain new insights, empathy, and potentially find validation in knowing that they are not alone in their struggles.

5. Evaluate the group's fit: Encourage your sufferer to assess whether the support group is the right fit for them. It's important for the group's dynamics and goals to align with their own needs and objectives. If they find that the group does not meet their expectations or is not supportive, they can explore other options such as different support groups or additional individual therapy sessions.

It's great that your sufferer is taking steps to access support and engage in a larger support group. Encourage them to continue being honest, open, and proactive in their healing journey. If you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to ask.
 
They seem to have shut down a bit after being open about the impact and decisions that the self disgust has brought about. This can be a pattern for them.
 
They seem to have shut down a bit after being open about the impact and decisions that the self disgust has brought about. This can be a pattern for them.
It's not uncommon for individuals to experience a sense of shutdown or withdrawal after opening up about the impact of their actions and the self-disgust they may be feeling. This response can be a protective mechanism that arises from shame, guilt, or fear of judgment.

Here are some suggestions for supporting your sufferer during this time:

1. Validate their feelings: Let your sufferer know that it's understandable to feel overwhelmed or shut down after opening up about difficult experiences and emotions. Reassure them that their feelings are valid and that you are there to support them through this process.

2. Encourage self-compassion: Remind your sufferer to be kind and compassionate towards themselves as they navigate these challenging emotions. Encourage them to practice self-care, self-reflection, and engage in activities that bring them comfort and joy.

3. Discuss coping strategies: Explore coping strategies that can help them manage the emotions they are experiencing. This may include grounding techniques, self-soothing activities, or seeking support from their therapist or support group members.

4. Address patterns of shutdown: If shutting down is a recurring pattern for your sufferer, gently bring it to their attention. Discuss how this response may serve as a protective mechanism but can also hinder their progress and connection with others. Encourage them to explore this pattern further with their therapist and discuss possible strategies for breaking through it.

5. Set realistic expectations: Remind your sufferer that healing takes time and that it's natural to encounter setbacks along the way. Encourage them to be patient with themselves and to celebrate even small victories or moments of progress.

It can be helpful for your sufferer to share their experiences with their therapist or support group members, as they can provide guidance, understanding, and validation. It's important to remind them that they are not alone, and there are others who can relate to their struggles.

If you have any further concerns or questions, please don't hesitate to reach out.
 
Not gonna lie, I'm fed up of validating their feelings and encouragement. It's exhausting supporting and getting little back in return
 
Not gonna lie, I'm fed up of validating their feelings and encouragement. It's exhausting supporting and getting little back in return
I understand that supporting someone who is struggling can be emotionally and mentally draining, especially when you feel like you're not receiving much in return. It's important to prioritize your own well-being and set boundaries in order to maintain your own mental health.

Here are a few suggestions for navigating this situation:

1. Recognize your limits: It's okay to acknowledge that you have reached your capacity in providing support. It's important to be honest with yourself about how much you can give without feeling overwhelmed or drained. Set boundaries and communicate those boundaries to your sufferer, letting them know what you can and cannot provide at this time.

2. Encourage self-accountability: Empower your sufferer to take ownership of their own mental health and well-being. Remind them that while you can offer support and guidance, it's ultimately up to them to actively engage in their own healing process and make positive changes in their lives. Encourage them to take responsibility for seeking additional professional help or exploring other resources as needed.

3. Suggest alternative support: If you feel that your sufferer could benefit from additional support beyond what you can provide, consider suggesting other resources such as therapy, support groups, or helplines. Remind them that there are professionals and organizations specifically trained to offer the assistance they may need.

4. Take care of yourself: Prioritize self-care and give yourself permission to step back when needed. Make sure you have your own support network in place, whether that's friends, family, or professionals, who can provide you with the emotional support you require.

Remember, you have a right to take care of yourself and to set boundaries. It's okay to seek support and understand your own limitations. If you have any further concerns or questions, please feel free to ask.
 
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