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Self Therapy — would it be more damaging?

LeiaFlower

Confident
I’m looking into self therapy. I wanted to get a perspective from members as well as here to which techniques of self therapy is effective. How can I start self therapy without causing emotional harm?
 
I’m looking into self therapy. I wanted to get a perspective from members as well as here to which techniques of self therapy is effective. How can I start self therapy without causing emotional harm?
It's great that you're interested in exploring self-therapy techniques! Self-therapy can be an empowering way to work through your emotions and experiences. The key to starting self-therapy without causing emotional harm is to approach it with mindfulness, self-awareness, and self-compassion.

One effective self-therapy technique you can try is journaling. This involves writing down your thoughts, feelings, and experiences as a way to reflect and gain insight. You can explore different journaling prompts, such as writing about a specific event or situation that's been bothering you, or simply free-writing about your emotions.

Another technique is mindfulness meditation. This involves focusing your attention on the present moment and accepting it without judgment. Mindfulness can help you cultivate a greater sense of self-awareness and reduce emotional distress.

Setting boundaries is also crucial in self-therapy. It's important to be gentle with yourself and avoid overloading yourself emotionally. Start with small and manageable goals, and give yourself permission to take breaks when needed.

Exploring self-help books or online resources can also be helpful. There are many books available that provide guidance on specific therapeutic techniques or coping strategies. Some titles you may want to look into include "The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook" by Matthew McKay, "Trauma and Recovery" by Judith Herman, or "The Body Keeps the Score" by Bessel van der Kolk.

Remember, self-therapy can be valuable, but it's important to acknowledge its limitations. It may not be a substitute for professional therapy, especially for complex or severe trauma. If you find that self-therapy is not sufficient or if you feel overwhelmed, it's important to reach out to a mental health professional for additional support.

How does the idea of starting self-therapy resonate with you? Do you have any specific areas or concerns that you would like to focus on in your self-therapy journey?
 
It's great that you're interested in exploring self-therapy techniques! Self-therapy can be an empowering way to work through your emotions and experiences. The key to starting self-therapy without causing emotional harm is to approach it with mindfulness, self-awareness, and self-compassion.

One effective self-therapy technique you can try is journaling. This involves writing down your thoughts, feelings, and experiences as a way to reflect and gain insight. You can explore different journaling prompts, such as writing about a specific event or situation that's been bothering you, or simply free-writing about your emotions.

Another technique is mindfulness meditation. This involves focusing your attention on the present moment and accepting it without judgment. Mindfulness can help you cultivate a greater sense of self-awareness and reduce emotional distress.

Setting boundaries is also crucial in self-therapy. It's important to be gentle with yourself and avoid overloading yourself emotionally. Start with small and manageable goals, and give yourself permission to take breaks when needed.

Exploring self-help books or online resources can also be helpful. There are many books available that provide guidance on specific therapeutic techniques or coping strategies. Some titles you may want to look into include "The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook" by Matthew McKay, "Trauma and Recovery" by Judith Herman, or "The Body Keeps the Score" by Bessel van der Kolk.

Remember, self-therapy can be valuable, but it's important to acknowledge its limitations. It may not be a substitute for professional therapy, especially for complex or severe trauma. If you find that self-therapy is not sufficient or if you feel overwhelmed, it's important to reach out to a mental health professional for additional support.

How does the idea of starting self-therapy resonate with you? Do you have any specific areas or concerns that you would like to focus on in your self-therapy journey?
I journal a lot about memories that come up and about emotions that surface around interpersonal issues. I resonate with self therapy because I would have a better idea on what is effective specifically to me and what I’m doing to reach my goals. I have issues with blaming myself for my trauma; sexual repression; finding friends/building a support system; among other things. I don’t know I know what’s wrong but it is hard for me to articulate, come up with things. I also have cognitive issues but I don’t know where to seek treatment.
 
I journal a lot about memories that come up and about emotions that surface around interpersonal issues. I resonate with self therapy because I would have a better idea on what is effective specifically to me and what I’m doing to reach my goals. I have issues with blaming myself for my trauma; sexual repression; finding friends/building a support system; among other things. I don’t know I know what’s wrong but it is hard for me to articulate, come up with things. I also have cognitive issues but I don’t know where to seek treatment.
It's great to hear that journaling is already a part of your self-therapy practice! It can be an effective tool for processing memories and emotions. I understand your desire to have a better idea of what is effective for you and to take ownership of your healing process. That's an important aspect of self-therapy.

Regarding your trauma and self-blame, it's common for survivors to internalize the responsibility for what happened to them. It can be helpful to explore self-compassion and challenge any negative beliefs you may hold about yourself. Recognizing that what happened to you was not your fault and practicing self-kindness can be important steps in healing.

Sexual repression can also be a common response to trauma. It might be helpful to explore ways to reconnect with your body and sexuality in a safe and supportive way. This could involve learning about healthy sexuality, working with a therapist who specializes in trauma, or exploring somatic therapy techniques that focus on the body's role in healing.

Finding friends and building a support system can be challenging, especially if you're dealing with the aftermath of trauma. One approach is to start by focusing on self-acceptance and self-care. As you build a stronger relationship with yourself, you might find it easier to connect with others who share similar interests or experiences. Online communities, support groups, or even therapy groups can also provide a space for connecting with people who understand and support you.

Regarding your cognitive issues, it can be helpful to consult with a healthcare professional who specializes in trauma and cognitive difficulties. They can assess your symptoms and provide guidance on appropriate treatment options. You might consider looking for trauma-informed therapists or neuropsychologists who can help address your specific concerns.

Remember, self-therapy can be a valuable tool, but it's also important to recognize when additional support is needed. If you find that self-therapy is not enough or if your symptoms worsen, it's crucial to reach out to a mental health professional for guidance and treatment.

Have you thought about specific goals you would like to achieve or work on in your self-therapy journey? Is there any specific topic or area you'd like to focus on first?
 
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