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The field of psychology and other jobs

Thread starter #1
My friends call me “the therapist.” I work in a different field, but I’m very relational in my approach. I liked studying psychology, but let’s just say I’d probably be terrible in the field. I lack privacy and boundaries.

Do any of you work in the field of psychology? Is it hard to do with a trauma history? What kinds of jobs do you do?
 

grit

MyPTSD Pro
#2
I lack privacy and boundaries
That sentence alone can be just your self critical part. I think anyone, who wants to be a therapist or human helper, can be. If you can read, absorb some theory and learn few communication techniques, the rest are intrinsic (being human) such as your relational level, respect and loving humanity in such you are empathetic and can walk along a person. Will you fall back to your wounded areas, yes of course, we all can....no one is immune to hurt, anger and hostility but...just as you are here and taking care of you, yes you can also take care of others.

A lot of times, those therapists that helped you most along the way, were those who just got you as a human....it was not they did not have personal issues (god knows what truly) but they just got you. You may get those dealing stuff that others do not get. and also you may find too much and learn so much about you and even heal through the process yourself as a side thing.

Explore more, volunteer helpline or with teenagers and get your foot wet to see how it lands on you. Today, there is so many ways to help others...including even a site like this~

I am changing career from corporate to therapy and it aint easy. I have several breakdowns...and still find hidden aspects, and deal with extreme inferiority, childhood trauma, my dissociation is getting better, and all other bullshit but I am passionate about body and mind, its relations to each other, to others and to the world at large. As much as I hated humanity growing up, I just as much love helping others to see yeah you too!
And I click with some more than others....so that makes sense to me! also it means some people click more with me than others...I am not jackie of all trades so I stick with that.
 

Eagle3

MyPTSD Pro
#3
I was considering becoming a therapist, but realized my inability to relate on a human level is going to make that impossible, after getting my undergrad degree in psychology. I'm totally burnt out on the whole "therapist" role, having grown up doing that. However, since my natural predilection is to help others and stress/trauma psych is truly an obsession for me, I altered my career pathway a little bit. I'm working at a therapeutic riding center, taking care of the therapy horses, but I have the opportunity to teach classes once I get certification if I choose to deal with humans again. I'd like to focus on the mental health aspect, working with adults with PTSD and teaching them how to heal with the help of my equine friends. Its mental health related, but it doesn't trigger me or endanger the lives or well-being of my "clients". I had to think outside the box to find something I could do!

If you're interested in working in the psych field, there are so many different options to look at. I second the suggestion to volunteer places to see if you like/can handle various roles. There is much more than just therapist in the mental health industry.
 
Thread starter #4
I think being middle aged may also be an issue. It’s possible I’m more interested in a volunteer role, but that stuff scares me, too. I love research and feel like that would be a good area for me, but I can’t concentrate for very long. I have a job and am really good at it. I don’t want to say what field it is because I don’t want people to look me up online and connect any dots. ;-).

My therapist made a point the other day that most therapists are in the field because they have “something” that brought them there. They don’t have squeaky clean easy backgrounds and lives. I tend to think mine does. Pretty sure she has never been molested or raped, but maybe there is something. Who knows, that is one area she hasn’t shared.
 
#5
Who knows, that is one area she hasn’t shared.
Sometimes I think I know everything about my therapist, who shares a great deal about her life, but then I remember that I have no idea if she has been through trauma or not. Hell, I know she wanted to be a hairdresser and fell back on therapy when that didn't work out, but I don't know why it was therapy in particular she fell back on. But that's not a question you can ask. Or, I guess you can ask, but it's not any of your business.

I'm just now starting grad school for counseling - just now as in my very first classes will be Monday - and my ultimate goal is to be a trauma therapist and advocate. After decades of puttering around and not finding any passion in work, I've finally found something I really, really want to do and there is no doubt that my life would never have gone in this direction without my own sexual trauma.
 
#6
I am a psychologist that works in schools. I mostly do assessments for special education for education and cognitive (think IQ tests) but I have the ability and skills to run counseling groups, do one on one CBT, support and educate staff on mental health and provide skills to prevent teacher burnout. For me it's not hard even with a trauma history, but I've been in therapy for 7 years now.

I know I would struggle to provide support to adults in a one on one therapy setting.
 
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