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Trigger symptoms

what are your thoughts on the concept of the inner child, and have you encountered any resistance or skepticism towards this idea in your own journey of self-discovery and healing?
I do not believe in the existence or concept of an inner child. Resistance and skepticism are an understatement, I would lean towards being vehemently opposed to the idea.
 
I do not believe in the existence or concept of an inner child. Resistance and skepticism are an understatement, I would towards being vehemently opposed to the idea.
I appreciate your honesty and willingness to share your perspective on the concept of the inner child. It's understandable that you feel strongly opposed to this idea, and your skepticism is a valid part of your unique journey towards understanding yourself and your experiences.

It's important to honor your beliefs and boundaries when it comes to therapy and healing approaches. While inner child work is a common and beneficial practice for many individuals in trauma therapy, it's not the only path towards healing, self-discovery, or emotional well-being.

Exploring alternative therapeutic modalities or approaches that align more with your beliefs and comfort level may be beneficial. Are there specific aspects of the inner child concept that trigger resistance or discomfort for you, @Shaylee? Identifying these factors can help guide you towards tailored strategies for self-discovery and healing that resonate with your values and preferences.
 
Are there specific aspects of the inner child concept that trigger resistance or discomfort for you, @Shaylee?
Nothing specific… in general the idea strikes me as extremely childish and immature. Yesterday I read a bit about it in Pete Walker’s book and it did not set well with me. Then today mentioning to you my puzzle prison was … I don’t know what. I have always known I am in the birdcage. I have always been able to see myself when I am also outside of it. I have always known it is me from a photograph that my grandmother destroyed but was always one of my favorite pictures of myself. But today…. Linking the idea/concept of this inner child thing with me in the birdcage…. Shocked me and angered me.
 
Nothing specific… in general the idea strikes me as extremely childish and immature. Yesterday I read a bit about it in Pete Walker’s book and it did not set well with me. Then today mentioning to you my puzzle prison was … I don’t know what. I have always known I am in the birdcage. I have always been able to see myself when I am also outside of it. I have always known it is me from a photograph that my grandmother destroyed but was always one of my favorite pictures of myself. But today…. Linking the idea/concept of this inner child thing with me in the birdcage…. Shocked me and angered me.
I hear how strongly you feel about the concept of the inner child and the emotional response it triggers within you, especially when it is linked to your own experiences like being in the birdcage. It seems like there is a deep sense of discomfort, shock, and even anger that arises when considering the idea of the inner child in relation to your own self-perception and past experiences.

It can be challenging when therapeutic concepts or approaches do not resonate with us, especially when they seem to clash with our beliefs or perceptions of ourselves. Your emotional reaction is valid and may indicate unresolved emotions or wounds that are crucial to explore in a safe and supportive environment.

Given your reaction, it might be helpful to reflect on what specifically about the inner child concept feels childish or immature to you. Additionally, exploring the connections you made between the inner child idea, the birdcage metaphor, and the photograph of your childhood self could offer valuable insights into your feelings and reactions.

Would you be open to delving deeper into these connections and exploring the emotions that arise when contemplating the inner child concept in the context of your own experiences, @Shaylee?
 
Not Only was I shocked and angry, I felt tricked and trapped into believing it. I think my anger was more towards the tricked and trapped feelings.
 
Not Only was I shocked and angry, I felt tricked and trapped into believing it. I think my anger was more towards the tricked and trapped feelings.
It sounds like the idea of the inner child triggered feelings of being deceived or manipulated, leading to a sense of being trapped into believing something that does not resonate with you. Your feelings of being tricked and trapped highlight a significant struggle with the concept of the inner child, which can create a barrier to exploring this aspect of therapy or self-discovery further.

Recognizing and acknowledging these intense emotions is an essential step in understanding your reactions and identifying what feels authentically true to you in your healing journey. Your anger and sense of deception are valid responses, signaling a need to prioritize authenticity and trust in the therapeutic process.

Given these strong emotions, it's crucial to honor your feelings of being tricked and trapped and to explore alternative approaches or perspectives that align better with your values and comfort level.

@Shaylee, in light of feeling tricked and trapped by the concept of the inner child, how do you envision moving forward in your healing journey while maintaining a sense of trust and authenticity in your therapeutic exploration?
 
Elaborate and provide examples please.
@Shaylee, exploring alternative therapeutic approaches that align more with your values and comfort level can be an empowering step in your healing journey. Here are a few examples of alternative approaches you may consider:

1. **Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT):** CBT focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to emotional distress. It is a structured and goal-oriented approach that may resonate with individuals who prefer a more practical and problem-solving-focused therapy.

2. **Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT):** DBT incorporates mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness skills to help individuals manage intense emotions and improve relationships. It can be beneficial for those seeking tools to navigate challenging emotions and interpersonal challenges.

3. **Mindfulness-Based Therapies:** Practices like Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) or Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) focus on developing present-moment awareness and cultivating a non-judgmental attitude towards thoughts and emotions. These approaches can be particularly helpful for grounding oneself and reducing stress.

4. **Trauma-focused Therapies:** Modalities like Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) or Trauma-focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) specifically target trauma-related symptoms and aim to process and integrate traumatic memories in a safe and supportive environment.

Exploring these alternative approaches may provide you with a more fitting therapeutic framework without evoking the feelings of being tricked or trapped. Have you considered any of these modalities or others that resonate with you, @Shaylee?
 
What is an alternative term or phrase for Inner child?
@Shaylee, an alternative term or phrase for the inner child concept could be "emotional self" or "authentic self." These terms may convey a similar idea of connecting with and understanding the vulnerable, emotional aspects of oneself without carrying the associations or discomfort you feel with the concept of the inner child.

How do these alternative terms resonate with you in comparison to the inner child concept?
 
What is an alternative term or phrase for mindfulness?
@Shaylee, an alternative term or phrase for mindfulness could be "present moment awareness" or "conscious presence." These terms emphasize being fully engaged and aware of the present moment without judgment or attachment to thoughts or emotions.

How do these alternative terms feel to you in place of the term mindfulness?
 
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