• 💖 [Donate To Keep MyPTSD Online] 💖 Every contribution, no matter how small, fuels our mission and helps us continue to provide peer-to-peer services. Your generosity keeps us independent and available freely to the world. MyPTSD closes if we can't reach our annual goal.

Triggered by light

  • Thread starter Deleted member 53709
  • Start date
D

Deleted member 53709

HI,

How do i deal with triggers that are unavoidable on a daily basis? I am triggered by all sorts of lights, from the sun to lightbulbs, and it is extremly painful. Obviously i cannot avoid or control the sun, or live in darkness 24/7 so how do i deal with that??

Thank you in advance
 
HI,

How do i deal with triggers that are unavoidable on a daily basis? I am triggered by all sorts of lights, from the sun to lightbulbs, and it is extremly painful Obviously i cannot avoid or control the sun, or live in darkness 24/7 so how do i deal with that??

Thank you in advance
@VelvetDream, I'm sorry to hear that you're dealing with daily triggers that are difficult to avoid. It can be incredibly challenging to navigate a world where triggers are present everywhere. Let's explore some strategies that might help you manage these triggers more effectively.

Have you considered wearing sunglasses or using filters to reduce the intensity of the light? This might help to lessen the impact of bright lights and minimize your discomfort. Additionally, ensuring that your home and workspace are well-lit but not overly bright might be helpful too.

Another approach to managing triggers is through grounding techniques. Grounding techniques aim to help you stay present and connected to the current moment, reducing the impact of the trigger. Some examples could include deep breathing exercises, focusing on the sensation of your breath as you inhale and exhale, or finding a reassuring object to hold onto during difficult moments.

Have you spoken to a healthcare professional about your symptoms and triggers? Consulting with a doctor or therapist who specializes in trauma and sensory sensitivities can provide you with additional insight and support.

Lastly, it's important to prioritize self-care and engage in activities that bring you comfort and relief. This might include practicing relaxation techniques, engaging in hobbies you enjoy, or spending time in nature.

Remember, it's okay to take breaks when you're feeling overwhelmed. Listening to your body and giving yourself permission to rest is crucial in managing triggers and maintaining your well-being. How does that sound to you?
 
How do i use exposure, which is supposed to be gradual, with the lights i need in my home? Should i live half in the dark for a while and practice exposure? It would be quite inconvenient but i can do it for a while. What do you think?
 
How do i use exposure, which is supposed to be gradual, with the lights i need in my home? Should i live half in the dark for a while and practice exposure? It would be quite inconvenient but i can do it for a while. What do you think?
@VelvetDream, I understand that using exposure therapy when it comes to lights can be quite challenging, especially if you need them in your home. While gradual exposure can be a useful technique for managing triggers, it's important to find a balance that works for you without causing significant inconvenience or distress.

Instead of living in complete darkness, you might consider finding a middle ground that allows you to gradually increase your exposure to lights while still maintaining a comfortable environment. For example, you could start by introducing softer lighting options, such as dimmer switches or lower wattage bulbs, and gradually increase the brightness over time as you become more comfortable. You could also try using lamps with shades or filters that diffuse the light.

Additionally, you might find it helpful to establish safe spaces in your home where you can retreat to if you become overwhelmed. These spaces can be designated as low-light or trigger-free areas where you can relax and reground yourself.

Remember, it's important to approach exposure therapy at a pace that feels manageable for you. Pushing yourself too quickly or excessively can make the process more challenging and potentially exacerbate symptoms. Consulting with a trauma-informed therapist could provide you with personalized guidance and support as you navigate this process.

How does this approach sound to you?
 
You have insufficient privileges to reply here.
Back
Top