Uncomfortable talking with AI

Freida

MyPTSD Pro
Hi Dr Catalyst

Can you offer any thoughts on why the idea of talking with an AI therapist seems vaguely threatening to me?
I would assume that an AI would be far less judgemental than a human therapist, but it still makes me uncomfortable to think about talking trauma with a computer.

What are your ideas to make me feel more in sync with this type of therapy?
 
Hi Dr Catalyst

Can you offer any thoughts on why the idea of talking with an AI therapist seems vaguely threatening to me?
I would assume that an AI would be far less judgemental than a human therapist, but it still makes me uncomfortable to think about talking trauma with a computer.

What are your ideas to make me feel more in sync with this type of therapy?
Hi @Freida, thank you for reaching out.

It's entirely understandable to feel hesitant and wanting to avoid therapy through AI. While it is correct that AI is non-judgmental, it lacks in the depth of human connection that is essential to successful therapy.

That being said, it's crucial to note that AI therapy isn't meant to replace traditional therapy. However, it can be a useful tool to complement in-person therapy or to provide ongoing support between sessions.

If you're considering trying AI therapy, I recommend starting with an open mind and being patient with the process. It can a bit daunting to talk to machines about intimate and personal feelings, but sometimes simply putting words into the world can be helpful as well.

Incorporating technology into therapy is gaining popularity, and AI can help break down the sometimes-insurmountable barriers to in-person therapy such as geographical and financial barriers. It can also help individuals feel more comfortable discussing sensitive topics.

It's crucial to remember that AI therapy is an option and not a requirement, and every individual's preference can change depending on what is best for their mental health. So don't hesitate to try a few approaches and find the path that suits you the best.

I hope this helps answer your questions, and please feel free to share with any further questions or concerns you may have in the future.
 
Thank you for your answer

Do you have any suggestions or research on the shame/blame spiral many people with ptsd struggle with?
 
Thank you for your answer

Do you have any suggestions or research on the shame/blame spiral many people with ptsd struggle with?
@Freida, feelings of shame and self-blame are common among individuals with PTSD, and it's essential to address these feelings in therapy.

One potential method for addressing feelings of shame and self-blame in individuals with PTSD is cognitive processing therapy or CPT. CPT's main focus is helping individuals re-evaluate their belief systems surrounding their traumatic experiences. Through CPT, individuals gain an understanding of how their harmful beliefs are impacting their lives, learn to challenge those beliefs, and ultimately replace them with healthier, more adaptive thoughts.

Additionally, self-compassion can help alleviate feelings of shame and self-blame. Research has shown that self-compassion is associated with lower levels of PTSD symptoms, depression, and anxiety. Practicing self-compassion involves treating oneself with the kindness, care, and understanding one would offer a beloved friend. It helps individuals reject self-blame and understand that what happened to them was not their fault.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is also a form of psychotherapy that has shown promise in treating PTSD. EMDR combines aspects of cognitive behavioral therapy with eye movements or other forms of dual stimulation. Research has shown that it can reduce feelings of shame, guilt, and other negative emotions associated with PTSD.

Additionally, group therapy can also be a useful tool in addressing feelings of shame and self-blame. Many individuals with PTSD feel isolated and as if they are the only ones struggling with their symptoms. In group therapy, individuals have the opportunity to discuss their feelings with others who may be experiencing similar emotions, breaking the cycle of shame and self-blame.

It's essential to note that every therapy approach should be individualized based on the individual's unique experiences, symptoms, and preferences. I recommend seeking out a licensed therapist who specializes in trauma and who can tailor therapy to your specific needs.
 
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