Study Voiding and PTSD

MnM

Confident
Why can't I find a hundred articles on how common voiding is for people with PTSD or CPTSD?

Everything I've read discusses proclivity for UTIs etc.... but nothing that nails down voiding. Anyone know of any studies on this?

 

bellbird

Sponsor
Stress, itself, is correlated with overactive bladder symptoms.
I've also recently found out that prazosin (the medication often prescribed for nightmares associated with PTSD, if you're not familiar with it) has a possible side effect of increased urinary frequency.

As for urinary frequency and PTSD, I did a quick search and found some papers that may be of interest, or at least a jumping off point.
I haven't looked to much into them, so hopefully they're helpful.
 

MnM

Confident
Yeah that's my point.... individual voiding symptoms are correlated, but not voiding as whole. People with PTSD/CPTSD have been shown to have general voiding symptoms - all inclusive puking, pissing, shitting, nausea, coughing, spitting, puking, sweating....

I was hoping there might be some research on the inclusive voiding symptomology.
 

joeylittle

Administrator
AFAIK, voiding dysfunction in clinical terms relates to the whole process of urination, specifically. It's not inappropriate to refer to 'voiding the bowels', but I think 'evacuate' or 'defecate' is the more common clinical language.

So, I'm curious - When you're referring to voiding, you're including all these:
all inclusive puking, pissing, shitting, nausea, coughing, spitting, puking, sweating....
...basically equating any substance coming out of any orifice with 'voiding'. Am I reading you right?
 

MnM

Confident
Hm. I thought I recalled reading in one of my PTSD manuals the authors referring to voiding across the board... I did know voiding referred clinically to urination, but I seem to recall it being used inclusively... is there no inclusive word for the sudden and unconscious excretion of any or all bodily wastes?

I mean check out this TMI google search:
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😂

I mean it's well known that if someone is literally scared to death, anything and everything is going to excrete. And shock or threat can do the same thing. Animals also do this when terrified of death or close to. **Racking my brain for the term, if there is one to rack....*
 

coraxxx

Sponsor
Perhaps we can find the term in a more general sense through food poisoning since that would in principle trigger a full-evacuating-by-all means response?
 

MnM

Confident
Perhaps we can find the term in a more general sense through food poisoning since that would in principle trigger a full-evacuating-by-all means response?
I don't know if this is for me, and if it is, I don't know what it means.... 😬
 

Rosebud

Not Active
Voiding, yes, at least here is the medical term for urination. But in terms of all the other possibilities also mentioned (the 'food poisoning' analogy) I think it's common sense, perhaps more a consequence physiologically of stress, anxiety and the like. For example panic attacks, chest pressure and/or pain, irregular heartbeat, tense muscles (even dislocations), elevated (or decreased) blood pressure, impaired immune function, nausea, ulcers and bleeding ulcers, fainting, hives, shakes, autoimmune disorders, etc. Whether they be situational or prolonged, or in response to elevated stress or a consequence of prolonged levels of it (kindey damage, for example), or a consequence of poor or absent self care or damaging coping mechanisms (eg substance abuse to try to cope) I think it's inevitable. The mind and body are intimately contected, even if we don't recognize it or acknowledge it. (Much as a stressor and stress response can go underground, and appear later, or blow up at the time, or not be recognized at all until we look back, or our body gives out). JMHO though. For example, I think I've got a bleeding ulcer (again). Thats going to throw a lot of things off, in terms of systems and processes, how I feel and also what I choose. It is perhaps a combo of nature and nurture, propensities and situations and choices, then it shows up in different (varied) ways.

ETA, there is also much documentation on how there seems to be a link between people who, for example, often subjectively feel broken hearted to having heart problems, or people saying everything is a pain in the as*, to getting for example prostate cancel. But it is critical not to twist that in to blaming, and forget genetics and environment, or what medicine does not know. What is well documented however, is if for example someone says ~'I feel a stabbing pain in my stomach', and no equatable source can be found, but they are asked what else feels like a 'stabbing pain' (and they say for eg their relationship with their child), then talking about that problem can reduce or stop the pain in their stomach in many cases. Quite the connection, if you think about it.
 
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Sideways

Moderator
I mean it's well known that if someone is literally scared to death, anything and everything is going to excrete. And shock or threat can do the same thing.
The research you're looking for may be in the research linked to the sympathetic nervous system. The various bodily reactions you're describing are part of the SNS response, yeah?
 
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