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Wanting to disappear

What are the differences and similarities of BPD an DID
Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) are two distinct mental health conditions with some similarities as well as differences.

BPD is characterized by intense emotions, unstable self-identity, impulsive behavior, and disturbed relationships. Individuals with this disorder often struggle with regulating their emotions, may experience a fear of abandonment, and engage in behaviors that pose a threat to their safety, such as self-harm or substance abuse.

DID, on the other hand, is a condition in which an individual experiences two or more distinct personalities or identities, each with its own pattern of perceiving, thinking, and interacting with the world. The identities may have unique names, ages, genders, and behaviors, and they may take turns in controlling an individual's behavior and thoughts. DID is often caused by severe, ongoing, and overwhelming trauma experienced in childhood.

One commonality between BPD and DID is that both conditions can be linked to a history of childhood trauma. However, BPD is not necessarily characterized by dissociation, and DID is not necessarily characterized by impulsive behavior, unstable self-identity, or disturbed relationships.

It's essential to speak with a mental health professional if you believe you are experiencing symptoms of either BPD or DID. A professional can help provide a proper diagnosis and recommend appropriate treatment options, which may include medication, therapy, or a combination of both.

Remember, seeking help for mental health concerns is a positive step towards improving your overall well-being.
 
I've been in a cognitive behavioral therapy, may I change into a EMDR therapy? I've got a good attachment with my psicologist but I have some traumas which I never approach because of the fear . May I go too to another therapy? Should I talk about it in my current therapy?
 
I've been in a cognitive behavioral therapy, may I change into a EMDR therapy? I've got a good attachment with my psicologist but I have some traumas which I never approach because of the fear . May I go too to another therapy? Should I talk about it in my current therapy?
Yes, you may choose to change to a different type of therapy if you feel that a different approach will better suit your needs. EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) therapy is a specialized form of therapy designed to help individuals process traumatic experiences and overcome their effects on their mental health and well-being.

It's essential to discuss your interest in pursuing EMDR therapy with your current therapist before seeking it out elsewhere. Your therapist can provide you with a referral or recommendation for an EMDR therapist who has expertise in treating individuals with similar symptoms as yours. Your current therapist can also discuss with you the benefits and limitations of EMDR therapy and help you decide if it's a suitable option for your treatment.

It's essential to have open communication with your therapist about your needs and concerns. If you're hesitant or afraid to discuss traumatic experiences with your current therapist, you may want to discuss this with them and explore other treatment options together. It's important to find a therapist who you feel comfortable working with and who can support you in your healing journey.

Remember, therapy is a collaborative process, and you have the right to participate actively in your care. Discuss your therapy goals openly and honestly with your therapist, and work together to develop a personalized and effective treatment plan.
 
I've heard that EMDR don't have consistent scientific evidence.
Actually, EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) therapy is an evidence-based treatment that has been shown to be effective in treating PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) and other trauma-related disorders.

Although the mechanism of action of EMDR is not yet fully understood, the therapy has been extensively researched and shown to be effective in reducing symptoms related to traumatic experiences such as flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety, depression, and other emotional difficulties.

Studies have consistently found that EMDR therapy produces therapeutic outcomes equivalent to those produced by other evidence-based treatments for PTSD, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure therapy. Some studies have even found EMDR therapy to be more effective than other forms of therapy in certain cases.

The American Psychiatric Association (APA), the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS), and the Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense (VA/DoD) all recognize EMDR as an effective treatment for PTSD.

It's important to note that like any other form of therapy or treatment, EMDR therapy may not work for everyone. It's essential to speak with a mental health professional experienced in treating trauma-related issues to discuss whether EMDR therapy is a suitable treatment option for you.

Remember, seeking help for trauma-related symptoms is an important step towards healing and recovery, and there are various treatment options available to support you in your journey.
 
I've have heard about post incest syndrome and I've got almost all the symtomps but I don't know If that symdrome exist
 
I've have heard about post incest syndrome and I've got almost all the symtomps but I don't know If that symdrome exist
"Post-Incest Syndrome" is a term that was coined to describe the symptoms experienced by survivors of incest. However, it's important to note that this term is not recognized as an official diagnosis in the DSM-5 or the ICD-11. Instead, incest or sexual abuse is classified as a childhood or adult traumatic event, which may cause Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) or other mental health conditions.

It's quite common for survivors of incest or sexual abuse to experience symptoms such as anxiety, depression, flashbacks, avoidance behaviors, nightmares, and other PTSD-related symptoms. These symptoms can have a significant impact on an individual's mental, physical, and emotional well-being, often leading to difficulties in daily functioning, relationships, and self-esteem.

If you've experienced incest or sexual abuse, it's important to speak with a qualified mental health professional who has experience in working with survivors of trauma. A mental health professional can help you identify and manage the symptoms you're experiencing, develop coping strategies, provide emotional support, and guide you towards healing and recovery.

Remember, healing from the effects of incest or sexual abuse takes time, and seeking help is an important step towards recovery. If you're struggling with the after-effects of incest or sexual abuse, there are resources available to you, including support groups, online forums, and treatment options.
 
My therapy told me I had sex wuth my own brother but I didn't know what was really hapoening until i was 10 or 11. He is 3 years older. Is that CoCSA? He wanted to do it even when adults so I'm sure that when we were younger he knew too about what he was doing. Is he a nynphomanyac? Is like a sociopath?
 
My therapy told me I had sex wuth my own brother but I didn't know what was really hapoening until i was 10 or 11. He is 3 years older. Is that CoCSA? He wanted to do it even when adults so I'm sure that when we were younger he knew too about what he was doing. Is he a nynphomanyac? Is like a sociopath?
I am sorry to hear about your experience. What you are describing is a clear example of Child Sexual Abuse, which is a type of trauma that can have a significant impact on one's mental, emotional, and physical well-being. It's important to note that the term "CoCSA" or "Continuous Child Sexual Abuse" is often used to describe situations where sexual abuse occurs repeatedly over an extended period, regardless of whether the abuser is a family member or not.

Regarding your question about your brother, it's impossible to diagnose someone as a nymphomaniac or a sociopath based on the information provided. However, it's important to understand that engaging in sexual activity with a sibling at a young age is not normal or healthy behavior. It is essential to seek professional help to address the psychological needs of both the survivor of abuse and the alleged perpetrator.

Child Sexual Abuse is a challenging issue, and it's understandable that you may be experiencing a wide range of emotions related to your experience. It's important to seek help from a qualified mental health professional who has experience in working with survivors of trauma. A therapist can help you to understand your feelings, develop coping mechanisms, and guide you towards healing and recovery.

Remember, healing is possible, and there is support available to you.
 
But I remember I didn't say no to him. I just did what he wanted. Because it feld "good". He didn't use any force on me. But I didn't knew what was happening. I knew we shouldn't do it because it was a secret but I notice what really was with 10 or 11 years old. That still being CoCSA? I feel like I'm over reacting because it seems more like experimentation or something
 
But I remember I didn't say no to him. I just did what he wanted. Because it feld "good". He didn't use any force on me. But I didn't knew what was happening. I knew we shouldn't do it because it was a secret but I notice what really was with 10 or 11 years old. That still being CoCSA? I feel like I'm over reacting because it seems more like experimentation or something
It's not unusual for survivors of child sexual abuse to feel confused or unsure about what happened to them, especially if the relationship involved a family member. What is clear is that you did not have the ability to give consent as you were too young to understand the nature of what was happening to you. Even though you did not explicitly say "no" to your brother, this does not mean that what happened was consensual or was acceptable. It's important to understand that engaging in sexual activity with a sibling or family member can have a long-lasting impact on a person's mental, emotional, and physical well-being, regardless of the level of force or power dynamics.

It's okay to feel unsure about what happened, and it's important to work through these feelings with a qualified mental health professional who has experience in working with survivors of child sexual abuse. A therapist can help you to understand and work through these complex emotions, develop coping mechanisms, and guide you towards healing and recovery.

It's understandable that you may feel like you're overreacting or that what happened was simply experimentation, but it's important to remember that what happened to you was not normal or healthy behavior.

Remember that healing from the effects of child sexual abuse takes time, and seeking help is an important step towards recovery. If you're struggling with feelings related to your experience, there are resources available to you, including support groups, online forums, and treatment options.
 
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