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Wanting to disappear

But when he started I was only 6yesrs old but he was only 9 years old. He didn't know either.
While your brother's age at the time might suggest that he may not have understood the severity or consequences of his actions, it does not change the fact that what happened to you was not consensual and has impacted you. It's essential to remember that regardless of intentions, engaging in sexual activity with a sibling or family member at a young age can have a long-lasting impact on a person's mental, emotional, and physical well-being.

It's common for survivors of child sexual abuse to feel like they should have or could have done something different or to feel invalidated about their experience. Remember that child sexual abuse involves a power imbalance, and children are not expected to have the same understanding or ability to determine whether or not something is appropriate for their age.

It's important to seek support from a qualified mental health professional who has experience in working with survivors of child sexual abuse as they can help you understand your feelings, develop coping mechanisms, and guide you towards healing and recovery. It's understandable that you may feel confused or overwhelmed, but know that healing is possible, and there are resources available to you.
 
But I wasn't sexuly abused... It wasn't abuse.... I don't know what was that... Jeez, I need therapy
It's understandable that you might feel confused about what happened to you. It's important to remember that any unwanted sexual activity is not healthy, regardless of the age of the people involved. Even if there was no force involved, it's important to acknowledge that you may have experienced emotional, physical or psychological harm as a result of this experience. It's important to work through these feelings with a qualified mental health professional who has experience in working with trauma and can help you process your emotions in a safe and supportive environment.

At this point, therapy might be the best way for you to address these feelings and to better understand what happened to you as a child. A qualified mental health professional can help you process any unresolved thoughts or feelings, develop healthy coping strategies, and work towards healing and recovery.

Remember, seeking help is a sign of strength, and it can help you find the healing and support that you deserve.
 
So it wasn't CoCSA, isn't it?
Without knowing more about the specifics of your experience, it is not possible for me to provide a definitive answer to this question. However, regardless of the nature of the experience, if you feel like you were negatively impacted, then it's essential to seek support from a qualified mental health professional who has experience in working with survivors of trauma.

It's common for survivors of any form of trauma to experience emotions such as confusion, guilt, shame, and anxiety. While the details and experiences of each individual's trauma may vary, the impact on mental, emotional, and physical well-being can be severe.

No matter what happened, the most important thing is to focus on getting support and taking steps towards healing and recovery. A qualified mental health professional can work with you to navigate and work through the emotions brought up by your trauma, develop healthy coping strategies, and guide you towards healing.
 
I had sex relations with my 3 years older brother but we started when I was 6 or 7 years old. Then I noticed what was happening and I realised It wasn't normal so I stopped with 10 or 11 years old. He was too young at the beggining for notice that because he was 9 or 10 years old. But when he was 21 he asked me for sex again so he still wanting. What was that? That was CoCSA? Was just kids stuff? What the hell was that? I'm getting mad. I'm lost I'm feeling bad...
 
I had sex relations with my 3 years older brother but we started when I was 6 or 7 years old. Then I noticed what was happening and I realised It wasn't normal so I stopped with 10 or 11 years old. He was too young at the beggining for notice that because he was 9 or 10 years old. But when he was 21 he asked me for sex again so he still wanting. What was that? That was CoCSA? Was just kids stuff? What the hell was that? I'm getting mad. I'm lost I'm feeling bad...
Thank you for opening up and sharing your story. You have been through a traumatic and confusing experience, and it is understandable that you feel lost, confused, and upset. It's vital to remember that children cannot consent to sexual activities, and it is the responsibility of the older person to ensure that the child is not exposed to any sexual activities.

What happened to you is classified as Childhood Sexual Abuse (CoCSA). It is a serious issue that can have long-lasting effects on mental, emotional, and physical health. CoCSA is a form of trauma, and the effects can range from depression, anxiety, difficulty with relationships, or PTSD, among other problems.

It's essential to seek out a professional to work through the emotions brought up by trauma, develop healthy coping strategies, and guide you towards healing and recovery. A qualified mental health professional can help you process any unresolved thoughts or feelings in a safe and supportive environment. Remember, seeking help is a sign of strength, and it can help you find the healing and support that you deserve.

If you need immediate assistance, please seek help from a crisis hotline or the emergency department of your nearest hospital.
 
Can i be a kleptomaniac without stealing?
I usted to steal things as a child but now I can control the urge.
Kleptomania is characterized by a recurrent inability to resist the impulse to steal objects that are not needed for personal use or monetary value. The act of stealing is typically accompanied by a sense of tension before committing the theft and a sense of pleasure, relief, or gratification during or after the theft. It's important to note that I cannot provide a formal diagnosis, but I can provide some general information.

Based on what you've shared, if you used to steal things as a child but no longer have the urge or struggle to control the impulse, it's unlikely that you currently meet the criteria for kleptomania. It's possible that your behavior as a child was influenced by various factors, such as curiosity, thrill-seeking, or a lack of understanding of the consequences of stealing.

However, if you continue to have concerns about your behaviors or impulses, I encourage you to consult with a mental health professional who can assess your situation and provide an accurate diagnosis. They can help you explore any underlying issues or patterns in your behavior and provide appropriate guidance and support.

Remember, it's never a sign of weakness to seek help when needed. If you need immediate assistance, I recommend reaching out to a crisis hotline or a mental health professional in your area.
 
I have a big urge but I can barely control it. But I can
It sounds like you are experiencing strong urges to steal, even though you are able to exercise some level of control over them. These urges may be causing you distress or discomfort. It's important to address these concerns and seek support.

While I cannot provide a diagnosis or determine the exact cause of your urges, it may be helpful to consider the possibility that your previous stealing behaviors have had a lasting impact on your impulse control. It's also possible that there may be underlying emotional or psychological factors contributing to these urges.

I strongly recommend reaching out to a mental health professional who can provide a comprehensive assessment and guidance tailored to your specific situation. They can help you explore the factors contributing to these urges and develop strategies to manage and control them effectively.

In the meantime, it may be helpful to develop coping mechanisms that can assist with managing the urges, such as distracting yourself with other activities, engaging in relaxation techniques, or finding healthy outlets for your emotions. It can also be beneficial to confide in a trusted person, such as a friend or family member, who can provide support during this time.

Remember, it takes courage to reach out and seek help. You deserve support and guidance in dealing with these urges. If you need immediate assistance, I recommend searching online for crisis hotline services in your area, as they can provide immediate support and direction.
 
It sounds like you are experiencing strong urges to steal, even though you are able to exercise some level of control over them. These urges may be causing you distress or discomfort. It's important to address these concerns and seek support.

While I cannot provide a diagnosis or determine the exact cause of your urges, it may be helpful to consider the possibility that your previous stealing behaviors have had a lasting impact on your impulse control. It's also possible that there may be underlying emotional or psychological factors contributing to these urges.

I strongly recommend reaching out to a mental health professional who can provide a comprehensive assessment and guidance tailored to your specific situation. They can help you explore the factors contributing to these urges and develop strategies to manage and control them effectively.

In the meantime, it may be helpful to develop coping mechanisms that can assist with managing the urges, such as distracting yourself with other activities, engaging in relaxation techniques, or finding healthy outlets for your emotions. It can also be beneficial to confide in a trusted person, such as a friend or family member, who can provide support during this time.

Remember, it takes courage to reach out and seek help. You deserve support and guidance in dealing with these urges. If you need immediate assistance, I recommend searching online for crisis hotline services in your area, as they can provide immediate support and direction.
Is it normal that my father gives me pats in the ass?
 
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