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Research What makes a good trauma service?

Thread starter #1
Hi all,
I am a trauma therapist and currently looking to develop a holistic and collaborative service which would be free to everyone who has experienced some form of trauma (Ranging from military to childhood abuse to illness and bereavement etc).

As well as providing therapy, I would like the service to offer opportunities for training and personal development and the chance for people to shape the future of services and understanding of trauma through participation in research.

It is really important to me that any service I set up is fit for purpose. I am also interested to find out directly from people who have experienced trauma what would make a good service.

I would be grateful if any of you guys could fill in my survey. The link to the survey is here: Helix Trauma Therapies .

Thanks in advance!

Roxanne
 
#3
Thank you for asking!

Breathing techniques were a life changer for me - I always thought I knew all I needed to know about breath since I was still doing it, ya' know - but diaphragmatic and alternate nostril breathing did wonders for my anxious self. However, after having been nearly suffocated multiple times, I had to ease into some of it and deal with the emotions that went along with it.

I agree with the meditation recommendation, too. Teach folks it isn't just about trying to sit still and be quiet. Moving meditation is just as useful and often much more effective for folks who simply can't sit still. I felt like I was failing at it for years until I learned differently via drumming and chanting and exploring nature.

Nutritional awareness far beyond the end of our fork - especially learning about how we don't only digest the product, but also the process of what it takes to get that product to the table. As a sexual and domestic abuse survivor, that one hit home the deepest after viewing firsthand what animals are made to endure behind the scenes. Highly processed food-like substances, gluten, and caffeine were the next eye openers that I didn't realize were harming me so badly.

Smells, candles, air fresheners, hygiene and cleaning products, and what we absorb into our bodies that we've been mistakenly taught are simply "good hygiene" or "fresh and clean" - I painfully learned fragrances aren't regulated at all for safety and contain many neurotoxins, endocrine disruptors, respiratory irritants, etc. that was creating hellish conditions in my body that were being labeled and treated as many things they weren't, much like with the foods and such. Please create a fragrance free safe space for us canaries in the coal mine of life. They are way too few and far between and we are rarely taken seriously. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity is now recognized by the ADA and will hopefully be recognized by more care providers sooner rather than later.

Massage therapy helped me greatly with being comfortable in my own skin again. It also helps ease many of the aches and pains, keeps my fascia flowing rather than choking me from the inside out, and helps with compassionate human connection. It took a few tries to find one that is a perfect fit for me, but was worth the efforts. Myofascial and craniosacral release are damn near magical, too.

Acupuncture and acupressure - again, damn near magical.

Finding a way to incorporate purposeful movement in each and every day. Something that's fun so it doesn't feel like a chore. I can't call it exercise or I'll avoid it. Hula hoops, that I make myself so they're the right size and easier to use, and a mini trampoline with a safety bar are my two favorites. Can be used indoors or out and feel more like play time than exercise. I made them part of my decor to keep them in sight and easily accessible. Music makes both much more enjoyable. Keeps the lymph flowing and shifts the energies and attention.

That's all that comes to mind at the moment. Hope it's helpful and in the vein you're looking for.
 
#4
The single most useful thing for me in trauma therapy, full stop, are 2 hour & 4 hour sessions.

Because I can actually talk about things, and take a break whenever I need to... to smoke a cigarette, and splash water on my face, shake myself out... and come back with my thoughts reorganised, emotions in range, and ready to work. A 50 minute session is nearly a complete waste of time, for me. As there’s simply not enough time to get into anything, much less put it away, again. And it’s ridiculous to lose 1/3 of that time in taking a break to ground and center myself back to being able to be an active participant. I’ve gotten more done, in a single 2 hour session, than I got done in over a year of 1 hour sessions. In 2-4 hour sessions I lose 15 minutes once or twice (breaks) and the rest of the rest of the time I’m working. In 1 hour sessions I get maybe 5 or 6 minutes of work done, and the rest of the time is spent either trying to crack the bear trap open just enough to be able to do somehing, but not so much that I can’t fake sanity to leave on time. 1 hour sessions really are a waste of both of our time.
 
Thread starter #5
Thanks guys. I really appreciate taking the time to reply to me and lots of useful comments there. That's an interesting one @Friday Moderator as it is something I have considered in the past and there is a type of therapy called Schema Therapy which often is 90 minutes- 2 hour sessions. I think a lot of hesitation with therapists is they will think that they are overloading the client but if you do it safely then I think it can be done.

I currently work in private practice (which I never said I would but need to pay the bills somehow) but just feel really strongly that mental health services should be free and more so that they should be developed in partnership with the clients who are going to use the service as at the end of the day you guys are the only ones who knows what it feels like for you as an individual. @Friday moderator, I know my survey has been removed which is fair enough but I was wondering whether I could post some of the questions as text on this post?
 
#8
Thanks guys. I really appreciate taking the time to reply to me and lots of useful comments there. That's an interesting one @Friday Moderator as it is something I have considered in the past and there is a type of therapy called Schema Therapy which often is 90 minutes- 2 hour sessions. I think a lot of hesitation with therapists is they will think that they are overloading the client but if you do it safely then I think it can be done.

I currently work in private practice (which I never said I would but need to pay the bills somehow) but just feel really strongly that mental health services should be free and more so that they should be developed in partnership with the clients who are going to use the service as at the end of the day you guys are the only ones who knows what it feels like for you as an individual. @Friday moderator, I know my survey has been removed which is fair enough but I was wondering whether I could post some of the questions as text on this post?
2 hour sessions are definitely better...I almost find myself unable to talk much for the first 30 minutes and have to just warm up a little bit. It is really helpful when I don't feel like all I have is 50 minutes to spew it all out or get half way through and have to stop. That is hard when you are in the midst of telling the worst things in your life....
 

joeylittle

Administrator
#9
I was wondering whether I could post some of the questions as text on this post?
I've put the survey link back into your original post.

As always, two things apply:
  1. We encourage members to use caution when sharing information with people on the internet
  2. Self-promotion is strictly prohibited
@RK176 - so long as you're here to have a discussion, not to recruit clients or supporters, you're welcome as a member. Thanks.
 
Thread starter #10
I've put the survey link back into your original post.

As always, two things apply:
  1. We encourage members to use caution when sharing information with people on the internet
  2. Self-promotion is strictly prohibited
@RK176 - so long as you're here to have a discussion, not to recruit clients or supporters, you're welcome as a member. Thanks.
Thank you and appreciated. Probably worthwhile for anyone reading this to write a bit about my background. Worked long terms with survivors of childhood sexual abuse and currently work in private practice but strongly believe that mental health care should be readily available and free for all. I personally don’t think many of the services out there address the needs of trauma survivors (For various reasons although acknowledge that there are some good ones) and it frustrates me so much that people aren’t getting the adequate help they need. Happy to answer any questions about my personal motivation or how I plan to fund it etc 😊.
 
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Thread starter #11
2 hour sessions are definitely better...I almost find myself unable to talk much for the first 30 minutes and have to just warm up a little bit. It is really helpful when I don't feel like all I have is 50 minutes to spew it all out or get half way through and have to stop. That is hard when you are in the midst of telling the worst things in your life....
Have you had much experience of therapists who do 2 hour sessions? I have personally never done one
 
#12
I do 90 minute emdr sessions with my VA T and my regular t and I have added 90 minutes sessions recently. I agree with the others - 50 minutes simply aren't enough. It takes me so long to calm down that by the time I'm able to talk the session is over.

I would love to be able to do 2 hour session - -though it would be exhausting.
 
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