Work From Home Stuff

RussellSue

Not Active
I created this post in response to a discussion I started having with @Mach123, but it's about work-from-home resources if anyone is interested or wants to discuss further. I thought I would put this here since I am always mucking up threads with long, off-topic posts.

I finished a long stint of college 3 years ago. The whole time I had expected to end up working from home, so I did a lot of research on the topic and fell for some work-from-home scams, too. After I finished school, my first job did not involve working from home, but I am working on that again, right now.

Rat Race Rebellion has turned into my favorite resource on the topic. Here is their welcome page: New? Start Here!. Their BIG LIST of jobs and side gigs is here: The Ultimate Big List of Work from Home Jobs & Gigs and there are a lot of different options to consider. The founders of the site have long histories in work-from-home employment, and the jobs and side gigs they list on the site are said to be fully screened. I have researched a lot of the options on my own, and it looks like they really are screened.

They also offer a $50 class on finding your first work-from-home job/side gig. I went ahead and took the class because while I had been getting local interviews, the moment I switched to looking for only work-from-home jobs, I stopped getting calls, but later I discovered that they have a whole lot of what is in the class, available for free, here: Speed Up Your Job Search with Our FREE RRR Learning Units .

No, they aren't paying me. I legitimately decided I liked this resource based on a whole lot of research I have done on work-from-home resources, though I do tend to be loyal.

I also learned to use Google’s search tools to look for jobs. It never occurred to me that companies often do post job openings on their own websites before posting to big job boards. In theory, if they find a qualified applicant through their own website, the job posting won’t ever make it to Indeed. By searching with Google, you can find jobs listed on company websites that are not out there in the convenient masses provided by the big job boards.

I didn’t know how it worked. Here’s an example of what to put into a Google search box:

“Administrative assistant” + part-time + remote

The quotes will go around two words you want to keep together in a search. The plus signs add more to the search. You can also include minus signs if there is something you don’t want to see like this:

“Administrative assistant” + part-time + remote - “front desk”

Of course, there are a lot of words that can be swapped, too. Here, you might have “clerical worker” or secretary in the place of the job title. You might swap part-time for “part time.” And remote can be virtual, work from home, etc.

What you will get from Google is a box that reads “Jobs” at the top. This box will contain job listings from job boards. Beneath that, there will be search results from across the web, some from job boards, some from who-knows-where and some directly from the websites of the companies that posted them.

If you click on “Tools” beneath the search box, you can also decide how far back in history you want to look. It ranges from searching for results that were posted in the last hour to any time. Obviously, applying for jobs that were posted two years ago could waste a lot of time.

My situation is that right now since I have a solid education in English and writing and have a TEFL certificate, I am looking at online tutoring as my next thing. I have tutoring experience but not online tutoring experience, so I am signed up to start as a volunteer with a couple of companies starting in January. I toyed with the idea of freelance writing for a long time, but since I don’t enjoy marketing myself and don’t have any social networking accounts, I am happy to be paid less, have regular work, and have someone else take of the advertising. I really can’t see myself as a regular “gig worker” because I can’t stand the stress of always being on the lookout for the next thing. Luckily, my husband has benefits and I don’t need to have them. Those are just a few of the things that I, personally, had to consider before making any solid decisions about my next endeavor.

It has been quite a process for me after ending up in a village after our fateful relocation from Portland. I did NOT want to work from home, because I like people, but right now, it seems like the best option and tutoring means that I will be working with people, so that helps my outlook.

There are, of course, a lot of other work-from-home resources out there and LOTS of places are looking for remote workers during the pandemic and many of those places will probably keep them on as remote workers even if/when this thing ends. There is Virtual Vocations, FlexJobs, and WAHM.com. Indeed also lets you search for “remote” positions. Amazon and many other large companies hire remote workers and the Arise platform might be interesting if customer service is your thing. If all you need is a part-time gig, however, that BIG LIST has a lot of different options.

Well, I hope that some of that is somewhat helpful to someone. Feel free to ask for clarification -- I burned through this post pretty quickly, so it won't surprise me if it isn't all worded in a readable way.

Best of luck!
 

Mach123

MyPTSD Pro
This is great thanks so much ! I have been thinking about it a lot since you posted it. My online story is now being risk averse mostly meaning I don’t want to get all involved in the next thing and make no money. I did what I call the junk business eBay and I made no money. My opinion on that experience and platform is you can make money on eBay if you have a source for something. Everyone combs the junk stores now though and it wasn’t consistent and my wife and I argued about how we were doing it. I have an amazon sellers account also.

There’s more lol. I am going to read this over again today or tomorrow and it’s really interesting and thanks again so much.
 

intothelight

Moderator
Other options are being a remote site employee for a variety of companies. I started working from home and remoting in, in the early 2000's. Post Covid, I have a feeling a lot of companies will have "at home" or "remote site" employees since it works for them and they don't have to keep the overhead of large offices. Industries trending are healthcare, insurance, service companies (intake and dispatch), inside sales, and some community colleges (English as a second language is a good one for starters.)
 

RussellSue

Not Active
Everyone combs the junk stores now though and it wasn’t consistent and my wife and I argued about how we were doing it.
The last place I worked was an eCommerce site for Goodwill. Most areas have a Goodwill eCommerce site. ECommerce sites send lists of good shit to the stores that they are not supposed to sell on the floor, but send to eCommerce, instead, because those things will make better money at auction. So, in addition to everyone and their mom being out there looking for good deals to resell, Goodwill employees are also picking that stuff and sending it to their own local eCommerce sites to sell on eBay, ShopGoodwill, etc.

That said, yeah, reselling is not as easy as it once was. Now, maybe in a large area, one could make a go by frequenting yard sales in summer, but thrift stores just aren't as exciting as they used to be.

Anyhow, Happy New Year! 🥳
 

Mach123

MyPTSD Pro
I created this post in response to a discussion I started having with @Mach123, but it's about work-from-home resources if anyone is interested or wants to discuss further. I thought I would put this here since I am always mucking up threads with long, off-topic posts.

I finished a long stint of college 3 years ago. The whole time I had expected to end up working from home, so I did a lot of research on the topic and fell for some work-from-home scams, too. After I finished school, my first job did not involve working from home, but I am working on that again, right now.

Rat Race Rebellion has turned into my favorite resource on the topic. Here is their welcome page: New? Start Here!. Their BIG LIST of jobs and side gigs is here: The Ultimate Big List of Work from Home Jobs & Gigs and there are a lot of different options to consider. The founders of the site have long histories in work-from-home employment, and the jobs and side gigs they list on the site are said to be fully screened. I have researched a lot of the options on my own, and it looks like they really are screened.

They also offer a $50 class on finding your first work-from-home job/side gig. I went ahead and took the class because while I had been getting local interviews, the moment I switched to looking for only work-from-home jobs, I stopped getting calls, but later I discovered that they have a whole lot of what is in the class, available for free, here: Speed Up Your Job Search with Our FREE RRR Learning Units .

No, they aren't paying me. I legitimately decided I liked this resource based on a whole lot of research I have done on work-from-home resources, though I do tend to be loyal.

I also learned to use Google’s search tools to look for jobs. It never occurred to me that companies often do post job openings on their own websites before posting to big job boards. In theory, if they find a qualified applicant through their own website, the job posting won’t ever make it to Indeed. By searching with Google, you can find jobs listed on company websites that are not out there in the convenient masses provided by the big job boards.

I didn’t know how it worked. Here’s an example of what to put into a Google search box:

“Administrative assistant” + part-time + remote

The quotes will go around two words you want to keep together in a search. The plus signs add more to the search. You can also include minus signs if there is something you don’t want to see like this:

“Administrative assistant” + part-time + remote - “front desk”

Of course, there are a lot of words that can be swapped, too. Here, you might have “clerical worker” or secretary in the place of the job title. You might swap part-time for “part time.” And remote can be virtual, work from home, etc.

What you will get from Google is a box that reads “Jobs” at the top. This box will contain job listings from job boards. Beneath that, there will be search results from across the web, some from job boards, some from who-knows-where and some directly from the websites of the companies that posted them.

If you click on “Tools” beneath the search box, you can also decide how far back in history you want to look. It ranges from searching for results that were posted in the last hour to any time. Obviously, applying for jobs that were posted two years ago could waste a lot of time.

My situation is that right now since I have a solid education in English and writing and have a TEFL certificate, I am looking at online tutoring as my next thing. I have tutoring experience but not online tutoring experience, so I am signed up to start as a volunteer with a couple of companies starting in January. I toyed with the idea of freelance writing for a long time, but since I don’t enjoy marketing myself and don’t have any social networking accounts, I am happy to be paid less, have regular work, and have someone else take of the advertising. I really can’t see myself as a regular “gig worker” because I can’t stand the stress of always being on the lookout for the next thing. Luckily, my husband has benefits and I don’t need to have them. Those are just a few of the things that I, personally, had to consider before making any solid decisions about my next endeavor.

It has been quite a process for me after ending up in a village after our fateful relocation from Portland. I did NOT want to work from home, because I like people, but right now, it seems like the best option and tutoring means that I will be working with people, so that helps my outlook.

There are, of course, a lot of other work-from-home resources out there and LOTS of places are looking for remote workers during the pandemic and many of those places will probably keep them on as remote workers even if/when this thing ends. There is Virtual Vocations, FlexJobs, and WAHM.com. Indeed also lets you search for “remote” positions. Amazon and many other large companies hire remote workers and the Arise platform might be interesting if customer service is your thing. If all you need is a part-time gig, however, that BIG LIST has a lot of different options.

Well, I hope that some of that is somewhat helpful to someone. Feel free to ask for clarification -- I burned through this post pretty quickly, so it won't surprise me if it isn't all worded in a readable way.

Best of luck!
Thanks I am still putting this off and doing a home project, insulation on the walls in the downstairs bathroom. I can always find tons of stuff I have to do for no money.

Thanks again so much for this, we got another lead we have to follow up about tracking covid on the phone. A friend has a son who is “in recovery” making $25 hourly on the phone in his pjs, no selling.
I want to work for cash but there is always the option of having the checks go to someone else and so on. I’m going to follow up this week (I’m supposed to).
 

Mach123

MyPTSD Pro
I created this post in response to a discussion I started having with @Mach123, but it's about work-from-home resources if anyone is interested or wants to discuss further. I thought I would put this here since I am always mucking up threads with long, off-topic posts.

I finished a long stint of college 3 years ago. The whole time I had expected to end up working from home, so I did a lot of research on the topic and fell for some work-from-home scams, too. After I finished school, my first job did not involve working from home, but I am working on that again, right now.

Rat Race Rebellion has turned into my favorite resource on the topic. Here is their welcome page: New? Start Here!. Their BIG LIST of jobs and side gigs is here: The Ultimate Big List of Work from Home Jobs & Gigs and there are a lot of different options to consider. The founders of the site have long histories in work-from-home employment, and the jobs and side gigs they list on the site are said to be fully screened. I have researched a lot of the options on my own, and it looks like they really are screened.

They also offer a $50 class on finding your first work-from-home job/side gig. I went ahead and took the class because while I had been getting local interviews, the moment I switched to looking for only work-from-home jobs, I stopped getting calls, but later I discovered that they have a whole lot of what is in the class, available for free, here: Speed Up Your Job Search with Our FREE RRR Learning Units .

No, they aren't paying me. I legitimately decided I liked this resource based on a whole lot of research I have done on work-from-home resources, though I do tend to be loyal.

I also learned to use Google’s search tools to look for jobs. It never occurred to me that companies often do post job openings on their own websites before posting to big job boards. In theory, if they find a qualified applicant through their own website, the job posting won’t ever make it to Indeed. By searching with Google, you can find jobs listed on company websites that are not out there in the convenient masses provided by the big job boards.

I didn’t know how it worked. Here’s an example of what to put into a Google search box:

“Administrative assistant” + part-time + remote

The quotes will go around two words you want to keep together in a search. The plus signs add more to the search. You can also include minus signs if there is something you don’t want to see like this:

“Administrative assistant” + part-time + remote - “front desk”

Of course, there are a lot of words that can be swapped, too. Here, you might have “clerical worker” or secretary in the place of the job title. You might swap part-time for “part time.” And remote can be virtual, work from home, etc.

What you will get from Google is a box that reads “Jobs” at the top. This box will contain job listings from job boards. Beneath that, there will be search results from across the web, some from job boards, some from who-knows-where and some directly from the websites of the companies that posted them.

If you click on “Tools” beneath the search box, you can also decide how far back in history you want to look. It ranges from searching for results that were posted in the last hour to any time. Obviously, applying for jobs that were posted two years ago could waste a lot of time.

My situation is that right now since I have a solid education in English and writing and have a TEFL certificate, I am looking at online tutoring as my next thing. I have tutoring experience but not online tutoring experience, so I am signed up to start as a volunteer with a couple of companies starting in January. I toyed with the idea of freelance writing for a long time, but since I don’t enjoy marketing myself and don’t have any social networking accounts, I am happy to be paid less, have regular work, and have someone else take of the advertising. I really can’t see myself as a regular “gig worker” because I can’t stand the stress of always being on the lookout for the next thing. Luckily, my husband has benefits and I don’t need to have them. Those are just a few of the things that I, personally, had to consider before making any solid decisions about my next endeavor.

It has been quite a process for me after ending up in a village after our fateful relocation from Portland. I did NOT want to work from home, because I like people, but right now, it seems like the best option and tutoring means that I will be working with people, so that helps my outlook.

There are, of course, a lot of other work-from-home resources out there and LOTS of places are looking for remote workers during the pandemic and many of those places will probably keep them on as remote workers even if/when this thing ends. There is Virtual Vocations, FlexJobs, and WAHM.com. Indeed also lets you search for “remote” positions. Amazon and many other large companies hire remote workers and the Arise platform might be interesting if customer service is your thing. If all you need is a part-time gig, however, that BIG LIST has a lot of different options.

Well, I hope that some of that is somewhat helpful to someone. Feel free to ask for clarification -- I burned through this post pretty quickly, so it won't surprise me if it isn't all worded in a readable way.

Best of luck!
Thanks this is wonderful. I’m just getting around to it now . So much to look at instead of just Craigslist, which gets depressing in a few days. My wife always says post her junk on eBay, she says I gave up but honestly, shipping was a nightmare and at the end of the day? I really don’t think we made any money. Not enough, that’s for sure. I did a lot of work on the store and I was shipping up to 4 items a day at times, mostly ceramics we were getting at savers and on Craigslist. I can’t even go in the junk stores anymore and yard sales ? Forget it. Yes there are big scores but, you have to dig through a pile of junk.

Tnanks again for putting together such a great list.
 
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