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A thread for scientific nerdiness

got plenty where i am too, but they are very protective of their secret food sources and will outright body slam interlopers. I think we have selectively developed a small herd of the toughest of the tough and thats all we get till someone gets old and bettered. I see pictures of the feeders with 5 or 6 on a feeder at a time seemingly getting along and i think “we can take ‘em”. Great entertainment for us at the sunrise coffee sit spot.
 
I just found out about shadow libraries. If you are someone who goes down research rabbit holes and thinks that research payed for largely by public funds should be available to the public then you might be interested in checking out SciHub, Library Genesis, Anna’s Archives, and Z Library. They are also a good source for full versions of philosophical and historical texts that would otherwise be chopped up into anthologies, as well as books not yet digitized. I think some of these sites are blocked in some European countries unfortunately.
 
Went fishing in Alaska years ago (my dads old collage buddy was living there, had a boat and a commercial fishing licence)

Weirdest thing was when we caught "uglies", deep water fish that would not survive the trip to the surface. So, do them in quickly and throw them off the back of the boat. Most of the fishing was well within sight of shore and several eagles would start out after "free lunch". At some point all but one would - without visual or audible cues, turn back to shore.
The remaining eagle would invariably time their pickup so the fish was at the top of a swell and use one or two feet to grab the fish depending on size.
 
Today I found out that while light behaves like a wave and a particle, in reality, it is neither. It is a quantum object and behaves, like all quantum objects, according to the Schrödinger equation, which has something called a wave function in it. This function does not show quantum objects as waves in the traditional sense of waves, but that their quantum states, such as position, momentum, spin, etc., are in flux, similar to the way the the amplitude of a classical wave is in flux. A quantum object is more like a wave of probability—the probability of finding it somewhere if we look there. This is different from a classical wave or particle, which exists in a binary state (regardless of the amplitude), rather than a probabilistic state.
 
I just found out about shadow libraries. If you are someone who goes down research rabbit holes and thinks that research payed for largely by public funds should be available to the public then you might be interested in checking out SciHub, Library Genesis, Anna’s Archives, and Z Library. They are also a good source for full versions of philosophical and historical texts that would otherwise be chopped up into anthologies, as well as books not yet digitized. I think some of these sites are blocked in some European countries unfortunately.
I use Gutenberg.org fairly extensively. Almost, but not quite, everything from 70+ years ago (I.e. Copyright). I've even contributed a tiny amount, from photographs of original sources, some hapless volunteer transcribed.
 
The remaining eagle would invariably time their pickup so the fish was at the top of a swell and use one or two feet to grab the fish depending on size.
As a former rescue swimmer? I've MISSED the crest of a swell, and slid nearly 40' into a ditch. (30-50 foot swell is arguable/debatable. It was a duck load of lightning to slide down). Without my flight suit? My arm would've been ripped off. As it is/was? I had to have maaaajor surgery to reattach.(Bankaert repair, etc.).

That CREST?!? Is vital. To life.

Unless you're an orthopedists' kid. Going to Dartmouth. On a mistimed NOW!
 
Honey bees can sense storms long before they happen. My dad used to keep bees as a hobby and one day in particular I remember we were near the end of the day and there was still some grass to mow. So pushed the mower in front of one of the biggest hives and boom......got stung a dozen times in the next 30 seconds, while i was picking all the stingers out of me and my socks, my dad decided - like I had, it was a good time to be done for the day as the bee's mood flipped from happy to nasty.

Ends up there was a huge thunderstorm approaching from about 100 miles away and even though it was beautiful and sunny.......they knew what was coming.

If a bee/wasp whatever tries to sting you - roll it off instead of "crushing" it. They have to curl their abdomen around to stick their singer in and by rolling them you flatten them so they can't push their stinger in. Slapping or crushing them just jabs the stinger in and makes sure you get a full dose of venom.

...and when stung by a honeybee it is important to get the stinger out. It is barbed and they usually rip themselves apart getting away after they sting and the parts they leave behind continue to pump and work the stinger deeper. Use a fingernail to scrape the stinger out without pressing or grabbing on the back of it where the venom sack is.
 
Honey bees can sense storms long before they happen. My dad used to keep bees as a hobby and one day in particular I remember we were near the end of the day and there was still some grass to mow. So pushed the mower in front of one of the biggest hives and boom......got stung a dozen times in the next 30 seconds, while i was picking all the stingers out of me and my socks, my dad decided - like I had, it was a good time to be done for the day as the bee's mood flipped from happy to nasty.

Ends up there was a huge thunderstorm approaching from about 100 miles away and even though it was beautiful and sunny.......they knew what was coming.

If a bee/wasp whatever tries to sting you - roll it off instead of "crushing" it. They have to curl their abdomen around to stick their singer in and by rolling them you flatten them so they can't push their stinger in. Slapping or crushing them just jabs the stinger in and makes sure you get a full dose of venom.

...and when stung by a honeybee it is important to get the stinger out. It is barbed and they usually rip themselves apart getting away after they sting and the parts they leave behind continue to pump and work the stinger deeper. Use a fingernail to scrape the stinger out without pressing or grabbing on the back of it where the venom sack is.
I seemingly "always" end up with gentle/black bees carving their nests near me. @TXbandit (apiarist extradonaire) might know.

Bees don't scare me, so my pheromones don't freak them out, is part of it. Hey, you? Whatcha doing? Means I walk though fields of thyme -with thousands of honey bees- untouched.
 
Bees don't scare me, so my pheromones don't freak them out, is part of it. Hey, you? Whatcha doing? Means I walk though fields of thyme -with thousands of honey bees- untouched.
I have this too, but with ants. Where I live we have these giant harvester ants which can both sting and bite with venom! One of the most painful stings in the world. I have done rituals to ask for protection from ants, and make offerings to them. One night I went outside to light a candle and when I did saw that I was standing in a swarm of them with bare feet. I felt very strongly that the ant queen was my mother. I lit three candles and when I went out later they had made this looping infinity trail around all three—incredible!
 
Bees don't scare me, so my pheromones don't freak them out, is part of it. Hey, you? Whatcha doing? Means I walk though fields of thyme -with thousands of honey bees- untouched.
Yup. there's that and people who are scared of them do all the wrong things most of the time. Running, yelling, screaming, I have pictures of myself holding swarms (when the hive tries to divide after raising new queens) of 4-5 pounds of bees with no mask or anything on. When the bees are busy gathering nectar in the summer - almost nothing bothers them.

The single best thing about working on bee hives in the summer? They gather resins from flower buds and turn it into propolis, a sticky green substance that they glue everything together with. You get it all over your hands and its hard to get off BUT any cuts or scrapes on your hands you get it on - heal super fast.
 
Every molecule in your body, from a free-floating glucose to the complex proteins making up your DNA, is suspended in solution. Molecules in solution move randomly. All of life’s chemical reactions rely on random collisions, and that’s why each cell is packed with an average of 42 million proteins to enhance the probability of such collisions—as all it takes is one bond change to trigger a cascade of effects.

A video on “how we see light” is what inspired this post.
 
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