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The pros and cons of using cannabis for ptsd

#26
I take my dosing very seriously. I do it to heal - not to get high.
Same here. I only microdose, which is unofficially defined as taking just enough to not get high. For me that was 1-2 mg (a nail sliver amount) for a few months and now I can go up to 2-3 mg. Since any kind of smoke irritates my throat, I only take edibles, which are well-measured here in my completely legal state (they cut up the chocolates, etc. into 5-10mg squares).

Here's my very-recent history of cannabis usage from a former anti-drug skeptic who is still very careful:

I was Ms. DARE growing up (I was literally selected to read be the model D.A.R.E. student) but my daily anxiety and waking up crying earlier this year was driving me nuts. A Canadian friend suggested CBD oil and after some research I chose a reputable company and my life changed.

A month later I was hospitalized with an autoimmune disease. Since we're not allowed to use CBD in the hospital setting, they gave me Xanax whenever I needed it. I knew I would end up with a dependency on it when I left hospital, and lo and behold I was discharged with full-blown PTSD flare and having panic attacks sometimes 3x a day. I hated using Xanax because I'm always terrified of becoming addicted to anything, as well as the side effects (dry mouth, headache, sometimes diarrhea).

I had to go through 2 rounds of chemo recently and that, plus all the meds for my disease, have changed my body chemistry so that I have to be careful with cannabis, whether as CBD oil (gives me diarrhea if I take my old brand - I had to switch to a less potent brand) or THC (sativa or hybrids give me greater anxiety, I have to stick with indica). My neurologist said to always take it on a full stomach, and that helps mitigate the GI disturbances.

I'm so grateful I live in a legal state because cannabis has given me fewer side effects than my heavy prescription drugs. Bear in mind, I take it for pain more than anxiety, but I will also take it if I have a day off and am just too anxious to relax. I'm a terrible napper with that lovely PTSD trait of waking in a panic at the slightest noise, and both Xanax or THC allows me to actually get a nap in without waking up gasping like I'm about to die.

I don't take it regularly, but anything that will replace Xanax, as well as curb pain is a welcome alternative to me.
 
#27
It is not legal in my state but I have tried smoking a few times with friends. Mind you, we are like 60 yr old women without much history in our younger day. It helped with anxiety for sure, but it did make me high. I was at a restaurant and a lady I know had a vape and offered it to me (stating its more medical). I got real confused, went back to my table and attempted to tell my friend what I did, then ended up blacking out when I attempted to stand and ended up under the table on my knees. My husband had to come and get us. I would definitely need the lower dose of thc for it to help. The article stated that vaping was strongest I think....it was for me. For now, until I can obtain it legally, I think I will just wait.
 
#28
I've been using it for the last while since I started dealing with my abuse. (Legally in California). Strange thing is that I quickly realized that vaping lets down my guard enough to handle flashbacks. So, even though I sort of use it to escape, my main reason I vape it is to remember... It's definitely helped me with that...
 
#29
Dr. Sue Sisely's 10-year research study on the ability of cannabis to treat PTSD has been concluded and the results are to be published this summer. I am not sure where the results will be published, but if anyone knows which medical journal it is to be released to, please let me know. I think a lot of people are going to be interested in the results of her team's research.
 
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