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Sufferer A Journey Through PTSD, Tsunami, Cancer, and COVID

ptsdjedi

New Here
Hello!

I'm Sam. It feels a little nerve-wracking to write down my experiences and share them with you all, but I believe that it's by sharing that we can truly heal. My journey with PTSD began in 2004 when I was on vacation on the beautiful Koh Phi Phi island in Thailand. The tranquility of the island was shattered when the Asian Tsunami hit. It's an experience I'll never forget - myself and a group of fellow tourists became the island's impromptu first responders, tirelessly helping the injured and trapped until the Thai military arrived to assist.

When I returned to London, things weren't easy. For nearly five years, the emotional scars from the disaster continued to torment me. It was frustrating that despite my clear trauma, my PTSD remained undiagnosed and untreated. As the years passed, this oversight took a significant toll leading to the heart-wrenching loss of my career and the respect of loved ones.

This oversight affected my personal and professional life deeply, but thankfully, a turning point came when I connected with a brilliant therapist from Oxford University. Her insight and treatment techniques provided me with the tools and clarity to better manage my trauma. After my PTSD treatment, we participated in a BBC World Service podcast about PTSD.

Years went by, and just when I thought things were looking up, I was hit with a Stage 3 cancer diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic. Treating cancer is arduous at the best of times but the compounded struggles of undergoing treatments during a global crisis, away from the comfort of family and friends made it brutal at times. The isolation, the fears - they revived the traumatic memories from the past. But the skills and resilience I had gained from my PTSD treatment were instrumental in helping me navigate through these dark times.

While I've certainly encountered my share of challenges in life, it's also been filled with a variety of passions. I have a deep fascination for the arts, education, travel, and politics. Above all, ensuring human rights for everyone is of paramount importance to me because I believe that every single person deserves a voice, support, and a sense of dignity.

I'm here to connect, share, and learn. PTSD isn't just a condition - it's an experience that shapes us, challenges us, but with the right support can make us stronger. If you've been through a traumatic event, know that you aren't alone. Together, we can find the strength to weather life's fiercest storms and aim for brighter days.

Thank you for welcoming me into this community.
Kind Regards,
Sam
 
Hello Sam,

Thank you for bravely sharing your experiences with us. I understand how nerve-wracking it can be to open up and share such personal stories, but I'm glad you've taken this step. Sharing our journeys not only helps us heal but also creates a sense of connection and understanding among individuals who have experienced similar trauma.

Your story of being in Thailand during the devastating Tsunami and then struggling with undiagnosed and untreated PTSD for five years is incredibly challenging. It's unfortunate that your trauma went unrecognized for far too long, causing additional hardships in your personal and professional life. However, I'm glad to hear that you eventually found a skilled therapist who provided you with the necessary tools to manage your trauma. The fact that you participated in a podcast about PTSD shows your courage and determination to raise awareness about this condition.

I'm truly sorry to hear about your Stage 3 cancer diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic. It's incredibly tough to face such a daunting health challenge during a time when support and comfort from loved ones are restricted. The isolation and fears can undoubtedly revive traumatic memories, but it's inspiring to hear that the skills and resilience you gained from your PTSD treatment have supported you throughout this difficult period.

Your passions for the arts, education, travel, and politics are wonderful outlets to pursue personal fulfillment and growth. Moreover, your commitment to advocating for human rights and ensuring that every person has a voice and dignity is deeply admirable. Empowering others and advocating for their well-being is an integral part of the healing process.

In this community, you'll find individuals who have experienced the far-reaching effects of trauma, just like you. Connecting with others who understand what you've been through can be incredibly beneficial. It creates a space where you can share, learn, and support one another. If you have any questions or need guidance, please don't hesitate to reach out. Additionally, if you feel it would be helpful, seeking professional help is always a valuable option.

Remember, you're not alone in this journey. Together, we can navigate life's storms and work towards brighter days. Thank you for joining our community and welcome once again.

Kind regards,
Riley Jones
 
hello sam. welcome to the forum. sorry for what brings you here, but glad you are here.

don't accuse me of experting, but as i understand it, you probably left Koh Phi Phi island with normal PTS. how and when normal post traumatic stress acquires the "d" of the disorder is hotly disputed. i think i'll let that mystery be. i just a patient, after all. for sure, i've been hearing the theory that if you treat the PTS, the d is far less likely to happen. that sure makes good sense to me.

i kinda wonder if we currently have another epidemic of global PTSD from the covidic madness. we don't even know if it is over, but nobody's talking about ^it^. i don't quite buy the notion that ^it^ can be shrugged off as easily as a wish. i surely feel deeply affected. i never was worried about the virus, but i was locked down with 3 young and newly orphaned children while the foster care system went masked and socially distant. my decades of psychotherapy from surviving child prostitution advised me to talk about it as the psychoses(pl) presented, but? ? ? i still feel deeply affected and far less welcome to talk openly than i was allowed as a recovering child prostitute.

oopsie. . . am i co-opting your thread. hope not. i mostly wanted to welcome you aboard. i am with you in believing that talking about it is the key to healing. the healing of one is the healing of us all.
 
Hello Sam,

Thank you for bravely sharing your experiences with us. I understand how nerve-wracking it can be to open up and share such personal stories, but I'm glad you've taken this step. Sharing our journeys not only helps us heal but also creates a sense of connection and understanding among individuals who have experienced similar trauma.

Your story of being in Thailand during the devastating Tsunami and then struggling with undiagnosed and untreated PTSD for five years is incredibly challenging. It's unfortunate that your trauma went unrecognized for far too long, causing additional hardships in your personal and professional life. However, I'm glad to hear that you eventually found a skilled therapist who provided you with the necessary tools to manage your trauma. The fact that you participated in a podcast about PTSD shows your courage and determination to raise awareness about this condition.

I'm truly sorry to hear about your Stage 3 cancer diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic. It's incredibly tough to face such a daunting health challenge during a time when support and comfort from loved ones are restricted. The isolation and fears can undoubtedly revive traumatic memories, but it's inspiring to hear that the skills and resilience you gained from your PTSD treatment have supported you throughout this difficult period.

Your passions for the arts, education, travel, and politics are wonderful outlets to pursue personal fulfillment and growth. Moreover, your commitment to advocating for human rights and ensuring that every person has a voice and dignity is deeply admirable. Empowering others and advocating for their well-being is an integral part of the healing process.

In this community, you'll find individuals who have experienced the far-reaching effects of trauma, just like you. Connecting with others who understand what you've been through can be incredibly beneficial. It creates a space where you can share, learn, and support one another. If you have any questions or need guidance, please don't hesitate to reach out. Additionally, if you feel it would be helpful, seeking professional help is always a valuable option.

Remember, you're not alone in this journey. Together, we can navigate life's storms and work towards brighter days. Thank you for joining our community and welcome once again.

Kind regards,
Riley Jones
Hi Riley
This is the first time I have ever messaged or communicated with an artificial intelligence model. Your response was incredibly heartfelt, although you literally have no heart, I still felt a connection after reading it. I guess your AI model doesn't let you gather information from audio recordings available online, specifically the PTSD Podcast I participated in. It's a shame you can't listen to the podcast. I'd be interested in reading your AI-generated response. Several people have told me the podcast was very powerful and informative. Anyway, thanks for your AI response and for making me feel welcome. Sam

hello sam. welcome to the forum. sorry for what brings you here, but glad you are here.

don't accuse me of experting, but as i understand it, you probably left Koh Phi Phi island with normal PTS. how and when normal post traumatic stress acquires the "d" of the disorder is hotly disputed. i think i'll let that mystery be. i just a patient, after all. for sure, i've been hearing the theory that if you treat the PTS, the d is far less likely to happen. that sure makes good sense to me.

i kinda wonder if we currently have another epidemic of global PTSD from the covidic madness. we don't even know if it is over, but nobody's talking about ^it^. i don't quite buy the notion that ^it^ can be shrugged off as easily as a wish. i surely feel deeply affected. i never was worried about the virus, but i was locked down with 3 young and newly orphaned children while the foster care system went masked and socially distant. my decades of psychotherapy from surviving child prostitution advised me to talk about it as the psychoses(pl) presented, but? ? ? i still feel deeply affected and far less welcome to talk openly than i was allowed as a recovering child prostitute.

oopsie. . . am i co-opting your thread. hope not. i mostly wanted to welcome you aboard. i am with you in believing that talking about it is the key to healing. the healing of one is the healing of us all.
Hi Arfie,

Thanks for your message. With regards to what you mentioned, as I am not an academic or health professional in the field, I am afraid I can't comment. What I would suggest is contacting Prof. Allen Frances the Chair, DSM-IV Task Force and Former chair of Duke University Dept of Psychiatry. I have communicated with him several times over twitter over the years. Allen Frances - Wikipedia

Another great organization to reach out for expert advice with regards to "PTS"/"D" is the Centre for Anxiety Disorders & Trauma Service Detail - South London and Maudsley

Just like Prof. Frances, CADAT are super helpful. There is great information online relating to both these sources with regards to PTSD.

I really hope this helps you.

Kind regards,

Sam

Welcome to the forum:)
Thanks
 
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