Clumsiness, bumping into things or people, dropping stuff ... can you relate?

jaccat

MyPTSD Pro
@sunshinedaydream I’ve just pulled this off one site.

https://dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk/about-dyspraxia/dyspraxia-glance/

It varies a lot between people, and is easiest spotted in children. In my case I struggled with handwriting, spatial awareness, and certain types of memory recall. As well as clumsiness, I was chronically absent-minded, couldn’t tell the difference between left and right until I was in my teens, had no sense of direction, needed extra lessons in primary school to learn to write, my motor skills weren’t great and certain basic activities like folding away clothes ( and, weirdly, knitting) were beyond me, which, with the spatial awareness issues meant I was often a walking disaster.


Much of it I’ve developed adaptations for, but it’s all still there. It’s hard to explain because my intelligence isn’t affected, but there are times when I can’t perform the simplest task. For instance, I can’t tell the time unless the clock or watch I’m reading has numbers (as opposed to lines or dots). I frequently lose things and it’s impossible for me to ‘retrace my steps’ as my memory is just a complete blank, and I’m constantly turning on the hot tap instead of the cold, and vice versa.

Like I said, it’s different between different people. This is just me.

It means I’ve acquired some fun stories over the years.
 

shatter eyes

MyPTSD Pro
But do you know if that came from the traumatic brain injury

Its from both. Early on in my recovery i would walk with a waddle wobble and shuffle my feet because it just felt unsafe because the floor or sidewalk feels curved or tilted while they look flat. I went through neuro physio rehab and the YMCA also had a program for TBI/Stroke folks. We practiced sitting in chairs and standing, walking heel toe heel and even advanced levels like balancing a bird on tennis racket while walking looking straight. This was done in a safe environment and i improved so i know the proprioception issues are not all TBI.

When I dissociate it feels like my progress has regressed or even worse. Tired plus stressors = drink water with hands from tap because getting a cup, holding, raising, drinking, SLIP OOPS, then i have a mess to clean up. The talk of dissociating only began this year because Pdoc witnessed it and after the session I stayed in wsiting room. When i went to leave the building i walked into parking lot light and head was bleed little bit. After that i mixed up streetlight and walked on a red....because i was checking for cars and saw green for the other street registering wrong info to brain. Now after each session we ground and chill before i leave pdoc office. Neurobiology is very interesting and hopeful that from this thread we can learn together how to be less clumsy.

I have this problem in "spells" if you will. I get bruises on my legs and arms as I bump into things.

Woah...same here with bruises but i dont and neuro doc calls them "spells" too.
 

hope4us

Policy Enforcement
Hello, hello!

I was wondering if anyone else on here is experiencing exceptional clumsiness ? (=tripping over your feet, bumping into things or people, dropping stuff, ect). I am not talking about stumbling occasionally, but about a clumsiness that not only you noticed, but maybe your friends/family as well - just because it happens that often.
This kind of clumsiness would point towards an impaired proprioception, which can of course have many causes, but considering what I have read about the neurobiology of dissociation, it would (in our cases) most likely stem from the disturbed sensory integration that accompanies dissociative symptoms.

So I was asking myself:

1. Are you very clumsy?

not that much endless i am dissociated at the time

2. And do you only experience clumsiness when you dissociate, or does it happen all the time?

not so much endless i am dissociatted, than i start getting very aggravated with myself becuase the clumbsiness is so bad. sometimes i even drop things without realizing it til later, and keep forgetting where i put things
 
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bird_on_a_wire

MyPTSD Pro
I'm not sure if dyspraxia is the term- it likely is the one I'm thinking of having heard- an executive function related issue for some. As @jaccat said , presents differently, like for some people their mind has their shoulder 'hit' the door frame (subconsciously) to give their mind info from their body of the spatial location/ specifics of their body. A GPS of sorts.

Otherwise exhaustion factors in. I learned somewhere when we drop things repeatedly that day, we are actually falling asleep for a millisecond, repeatedly.
 
I am usually super clumsy. Sometimes when I dissociate I’m exceptionally more clumsy! Other times when I dissociate I am way less clumsy and able to do things I normally couldn’t.
 

Qispiumina

New Here
@siniang Hey there!

Yeah, thats what I thought too at first, but even after trying to do everything carefully and slowly I still bumped into things. Which was really weird honestly. It's as if my brain just doesn't know where my body is?
I mean, the proprioception-dissociation link is just a guess based the neurology of both phenomena and the disorders that they concurrently appear in (for example autism). I found it interesting, but I could be totally wrong! I am currently searching for a topic that I could investigate with a small study (which I need to carry out for my master thesis), thats why I came up with this idea?
Hey there - are you doing the study on this? I have been super clumsy for most of my life, tripping over things and skinning my knees well into my late 30s. I have also historically had trouble with directions and finding my way - before GPS I was constantly getting lost. Interestingly, as I have improved with the PTSD symptoms, the clumsiness and lack of orientation have also improved. I was thinking of doing a similar study, so would love to compare notes!
 

Juso

MyPTSD Pro
I was thinking of doing a similar study, so would love to compare notes!
Hey @Qispiumina ! Thanks for you reply;blank;i've focused on autism for my masther thesis now unfortunately. But I still want to carry out a study about this topic - maybe while writing my phd? I'll let you know if I will be able to do some research next year!❤
 
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